Feb 03, 2023  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 100L - Chemical Science Laboratory

    (1 cr) The laboratory emphasizes learning by discovery and by student-designed (or modified) experiments. Current or prior enrollment in CHEM 100 is required.
  
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    CHEM 101 - Chemistry in Society I

    (3 cr) With CHEM 101L , CHEM 102 , and CHEM 102L , satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Designed for the non-science major, Chemistry in Society is a study of the fundamental facts, laws and principles of inorganic and organic chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the role of chemistry in our culture and everyday life as well as the benefits and costs of chemical technology. Topics to be covered include the scientific method, atomic theory, redox chemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Other topics covered include waste management, food production, population and agribusiness.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

       LS

  
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    CHEM 101L - Chemistry in Society I Laboratory

    (1 cr each) With CHEM 101 , CHEM 102 , and CHEM 102L , satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Chemistry in Society I lab is designed for non-science majors, and includes experiments that demonstrate theories presented in the lecture, CHEM 101. A portion of the course will involve looking outside the lab, in media (print, television, cinema) and discussion of the role of chemistry in our culture and everyday affairs, especially the benefits and costs of chemical technology. Some of the topics to be covered will include the scientific method, and consumer products and advertising. Laboratory topics and sequence integrated with lecture.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 102 - Chemistry in Society II

    (3 cr) With CHEM 101 , CHEM 101L , and CHEM 102L , satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement.  The course involves the study of the fundamental principles of chemistry with particular emphasis on the role of chemistry in our culture and everyday affairs, and the benefits and costs of chemical technology.  Toipcs to be covered include energy production, consumption and resources, natural resources, water and air, biochemistry and  molecular biology, food production, population and agribusiness, consumer products and advertising, chemical, medicines and pharmaceutics, and toxicology and waste management.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 102L - Chemistry in Society II Laboratory

    (1 cr each) With CHEM 101, CHEM 101L, and CHEM 102L, satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement.  Integrated approach to the chemistry of plants, animals, and microorganisms. Half of the course is centered around environmental principles, and the other half is centered around organismic homeostatic (regulatory) principles. Laboratory topics and sequence integrated with lecture.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

     

    CORE CODES:   LS

     

  
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    CHEM 105 - Introduction to Chemistry

    (3cr) CHEM 105 is designed for students majoring in the physical, biological, or health sciences and who have not taken a chemistry course in high school. It is also appropriate for students who need additional time to complete math courses before taking CHEM 125  or CHEM 207 . Topics will include measurements, unit conversion, atoms and subatomic particles, periodicity, ionic and covalent compounds, inorganic nomenclature, the mole, molar mass calculations, balancing reactions, predicting the chemical product, concentration units, solubility, and acids and  bases. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 101  or higher math.
  
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    CHEM 120 - College Chemistry I

    (3 cr each) CHEM 120 and its companion course CHEM 120L are the first part of a two-semester sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. Topics include measurements and units, nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, solutions, chemical reactivity, acids and bases, thermochemistry, properties of gases, and an introduction to organic chemistry.  This course, along with CHEM 120L , CHEM 122 , and CHEM 122L , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 120L  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 120L - College Chemistry I Laboratory

    (1 cr each) CHEM 120L is a laboratory course designed to be taken with CHEM 120.  CHEM 120 and  CHEM 120L are the first part of a two-semester sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. Topics include measurements and units, nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, solutions, chemical reactivity, acids and bases, thermochemistry, and properties of gases.  This course, along with CHEM 120 CHEM 122 , and CHEM 122L , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 120  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS
  
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    CHEM 122 - College Chemistry II

    (3 cr each) CHEM 122 and its companion course CHEM 122L are the second part of a two-semester sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. The course places special emphasis on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. The course begins with an introduction to organic chemistry that will serve as a basis for the study of the biochemically important compounds such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. This course, along with CHEM 120 , CHEM 120L , and CHEM 122L , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 120 .   Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 122L  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 122L - College Chemistry II Laboratory

    (1 cr each) CHEM 122L is a laboratory course designed to be taken with CHEM 122.  CHEM 122 and 122L are the second part of a two-term sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. Topics covered include organic functional groups, reactions of organic and biological compounds, and measurement of biologically important molecules.  This course, along with CHEM 120 CHEM 120L , and CHEM 122 , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 122  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 125 - Chemistry for the Health Sciences

    (3cr) CHEM 125 and its companion course CHEM 125L  provide an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing or other health related program. Special emphasis is placed on the chemistry related to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. Topics include measurements and units, nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding and interactions, stoichiometry, solutions and gases, chemical reactions, acids and bases, structure and nomenclature or organic compounds, organic reactions, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, and metabolism. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 105 . Corequisite: CHEM 125L .
  
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    CHEM 125L - Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab

    (1cr) CHEM 125L is the companion laboratory course to CHEM 125  which presents an overview of fundamental laboratory principles and practices for students preparing for a nursing or other health related program. Special emphasis is placed on laboratory safety, chemical hazards, waste disposal, glassware, chemical modeling, specific heat, gas laws, molarity, titration, synthesis, chromatography, and spectroscopy. Corequisite: CHEM 125 .
  
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    CHEM 207 - General Chemistry I

    (3 cr) CHEM 207 and its companion lab, CHEM 207L, are the first part of a two-semester sequence that serves as an introduction to modern chemistry for students majoring in the sciences.  The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology.   Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course.  The topics covered include measurements and units, atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical reactivity, thermochemistry, and the structure and properties of gases, liquids and solids.  This course, along with CHEM 207L CHEM 209 , and CHEM 209L , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or CHEM 105  or permission of instructor. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 105  or appropriate placement score.   Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 207L  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 207L - General Chemistry I Laboratory

    (1 cr) CHEM 207L is a laboratory course that is designed to accompany CHEM 207. The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course. The topics covered include measurements and units, basic laboratory techniques, quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, gravimetric analysis, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and chromatography. This course, along with CHEM 207 , CHEM 209 , and CHEM 209L , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or CHEM 105  or permission of  instructor. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 105  or appropriate placement score.   Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 207  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 209 - General Chemistry II

    (3 cr) CHEM 209 and its associated lab, CHEM 209L, are the second part of a two-semester sequence that serves as an introduction to modern chemistry for students majoring in the sciences. The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course. The topics covered include equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, solutions and solubility, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, nuclear chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry. This course, along with CHEM 207 , CHEM 207L , and CHEM 209L , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 207 . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 209L  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 209L - General Chemistry II Laboratory

    (1 cr) CHEM 209L is a laboratory course that is designed to accompany CHEM 209.  The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course. The topics covered include volumetric analysis, chromatography, spectroscopy, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, colligative properties and organic and inorganic synthesis. This course, along with CHEM 207 , CHEM 207L , and CHEM 209 , fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 207  and CHEM 207L . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 209  be taken concurrently.

     :   LS

  
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    CHEM 250 - Introduction to Forensic Science

    (3cr) CHEM 250 is a one-semester survey lecture course for students interested in the hard sciences underlying forensic investigations. This course is suited for a broad spectrum of majors, not just science majors. Topics include studies of drugs of abuse, fingerprinting, crime scene search techniques, and many others. A special aspect of the course is case scenarios and discussions based on the outcome of real-life investigations. Prerequisites: One year of college-level science.
  
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    CHEM 301 - Inorganic Chemistry

    (3 cr) Expands on the inorganic chemistry covered in CHEM 207 and 209. The course includes more advanced concepts of molecular bonding and structure, acid-base chemistry, and the structure of solids. The structure and properties of coordination compounds is studied in great detail. Group theory is introduced and used to illustrate how symmetry helps to understand molecular structure. Prerequisites: CHEM 209 
  
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    CHEM 311 - Chemical Pharmacology

    (3 cr) This course is an introduction to the structure, mechanisms of action, and clinical application of drugs currently in use. The emphasis is on general pharmacological principles and on a survey of a wide spectrum of agents; chemical aspects of pharmacology are stressed where they contribute significantly to the understanding of drug action. Prerequisites: One semester of anatomy/physiology and one semester of chemistry; or, permission of the instructor.
  
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    CHEM 315 - Organic Chemistry I

    (3cr) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structure and reactivity of organic compounds. Topics covered include the chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, and other functional groups. Reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy of organic compounds are emphasized.  Previously titled Organic Chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 207 . Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 315L  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 315L - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    (1cr) This course introduces organic synthesis, mechanistic studies, molecular modeling, and modern techniques for the separation and characterization of organic compounds. TLC, GC-MS, IR, NMR, distillation, and polarimetry are emphasized. Prerequisites: CHEM 207L  and CHEM 209L . Prerequisite/corequisite: Current or prior enrollment in CHEM 315  is required.
  
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    CHEM 316 - Organic Chemistry II

    (3 cr each) This course is a continuation of the topics introduced in CHEM 315, with a focus on alkynes, aromatic compounds, and compounds with oxygen-based functional groups. This course focuses on and emphasizes understanding the reaction mechanisms these molecules undergo during synthetic reactions. Previously titled Organic Chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 209  and CHEM 315 . Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required that CHEM 316L  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 316L - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    (1 cr) This course continues exploring routes of organic synthesis, mechanistic studies, molecular modeling, and modern techniques for the separation and characterization of organic compounds. Distillation, GC-MS, IR, and NMR studies are expanded. Prerequisites: CHEM 315  and CHEM 315L . Prerequisite/corequisite: Current or prior enrollment in CHEM 316  is required.
  
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    CHEM 321 - Analytical Chemistry

    (3 cr) CHEM 321 covers the theoretical background and practical problem solving skills needed for quantitative chemical analyses. Volumetric, gravimetric, and potentiometric techniques are covered in detail. Chromatography and spectroscopy are covered at an introductory level. Also covered are chemical equilibrium, acid-base theory, and the statistical methods needed for the critical evaluation of data. Prerequisites: CHEM 209 . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 321L  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 321L - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    (1 cr) CHEM 321L covers the techniques for volumetric, gravimetric, potentiometric, chromatographic, and spectroscopic analyses. Particular attention is given to data analysis and critical evaluation of data. Students are introduced to, and are expected to use, advanced data handling and error treatment methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 209  and CHEM 209L . Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 321  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 322 - Instrumental Analysis

    (3 cr) CHEM 322 covers both the theoretical and the practical aspects of modern chemical instrumental techniques. Most important types of analytical methods are covered,  including atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, chromatography, electrophoresis, electrochemistry, and surface analysis. Special emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of spectroscopy, chromatography and electrochemistry. Instrument design, sample preparation methods, precision, detection limits, selectivity, and sensitivity are examined for each technique. Specific applications are discussed for chemical, biochemical, and environmental analyses. Prerequisites: CHEM 321 . Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 322L  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 322L - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    (1 cr) CHEM 322L is laboratory course that provides hands-on experience with modern analytical instrumentation and techniques. Students will learn how to prepare samples and how to optimize instrument parameters for several types of instrumentation. Techniques covered include atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, electrochemistry, mass spectroscopy, and chromatography. Students are expected to use advanced data handling and error treatment methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 321 . Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 322  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 325 - Computers in Science

    (3 cr) In CHEM 325 common computer programs are used for data analysis, problem solving, and data presentation. Spreadsheets for the analysis of many different types of scientific data are developed. Spreadsheet functions are used to apply several statistical methods including confidence intervals, t-tests, F-tests, single factor ANOVA, histograms, and linear regression. Other topics covered include calibrations curves, determination of quantities from slopes and intercepts, testing models, solving single and multivariable equations, and user defined functions. The preparation of effective scientific plots and scientific presentations is covered in detail. Prerequisites: CHEM 207 
  
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    CHEM 329 - Biochemistry I

    (3 cr) Biochemical structure and function with initial emphasis placed on the properties of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins and the relationship between structure and function. This is followed by an introduction to enzymes and the mechanisms of enzyme action. A discussion of the structure and function of biological membranes is then presented. Attention is then given to the nucleic acids and includes the genetic role, structure, and replication of DNA and the role of RNA in protein synthesis. Prerequisites: CHEM 315  and BIOL 305 .
  
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    CHEM 329L - Biochemistry I Laboratory

    (1 cr) A three-hour per week laboratory course to be taken with CHEM 329 - Biochemistry I . The course will comprise an overview and application of techniques associated with biochemical research, data gathering, and analysis. The students will be introduced to various computer-based methodologies of data analysis, molecular modelling and presentation. In addition, the course will involve development of experimental design, reproducible lab techniques, and record keeping. Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 329 .
  
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    CHEM 330 - Biochemistry II

    (3 cr) Basic concepts of intermediary metabolism with initial emphasis placed on the broad aspects of metabolism and includes a discussion of the energy requirements for reactions in living systems. The degradation of carbohydrates and the biochemical role of glycolysis, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and related pathways are then presented. This is followed by an examination of fatty acid metabolism, nucleotide biochemistry, and selected topics in biosynthesis. Attention is then given to mechanisms of hormone action, transport across biological membranes, and related membrane activity. The synthesis of proteins, control of translation, and post-translational processing is discussed in depth. Prerequisites: CHEM 329 .
  
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    CHEM 330L - Biochemistry II Laboratory

    (1 cr) A second three-hours per week laboratory to be taken with CHEM 330  Biochemistry II. The course involves the application of techniques developed in CHEM 329L  to problems associated with characterization of carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. Included in the experiments performed is the development of purification techniques, protein production by plasmid transfection in bacterial transformation, enzyme kinetics, and spectroscopic analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 329  and CHEM 329L . Corequisite: CHEM 330 .
  
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    CHEM 331 - Seminar

    (1 cr each) This course may be taken more than once for credit. The selection, organization, and presentation of topics within one’s area of interest in chemistry. Topics are selected from among the current literature, review articles, and reports in scientific journals. Prerequisites: CHEM 207 , CHEM 209 .
  
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    CHEM 333 - Environmental Chemistry

    (3 cr) CHEM 333 is a course for students interested in the chemical aspects of the environment. This course is intended for chemistry, environmental science and biology majors. Environmental Chemistry is a one-semester survey course that includes many topics. These include studies of the chemistry of the upper and lower atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, the chemistry of ground and surface water, energy use and its consequences, important organic and inorganic environmental toxins, and waste management. Prerequisites: CHEM 209 . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 333L  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 333L - Environmental Chemistry Lab

    (1 cr) CHEM 333L is a one-credit laboratory course covering analytical techniques important to environmental testing. Particular emphasis is placed on methods for water and soil analysis. Volumetric, electrochemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques are covered. Students learn how to prepare samples and how to make accurate and precise measurements. Particular attention is given to data analysis and evaluation of data. Prerequisites: CHEM 209L . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 333  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 340 - Physical Chemistry I

    (3cr) CHEM 340 examines chemical phenomena from fundamental physical principles. It provides the foundation and essentials of thermodynamics and kinetics. Topics include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, solution properties, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 209  or PHYS 202  or PHYS 222 . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 340L  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 340L - Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

    (1cr) CHEM 340L is a laboratory course designed to accompany CHEM 340. Topics include thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 340  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 350 - Forensic Chemistry

    (3cr) Forensic chemistry is a course for students interested in the hard-sciences underlying forensic investigations. This course is suited for chemistry or biology majors. Forensic chemistry is a one-semester survey course that includes many topics. These topics include studies of drugs of abuse, forensic instrumentation, forensic laboratory analysis, and many others. A special aspect of the course is case scenarios and discussions based on the outcome of real-life investigations. Prerequisites: CHEM 315 .
  
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    CHEM 392 - Cooperative Education in Chemistry

    (1-9 cr) Cooperative education is a form of education which integrates classroom study with paid, planned, and supervised work experiences in the public and privates sectors. Cooperative education allows students to acquire essential, practical skills by being exposed to the reality of the work world beyond the boundaries of campus, enhancing their self-confidence and career direction. An agreement is signed by the employer supervisor, the faculty supervisor, and the student. The co-op may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; minimum 2.3 GPA, 2.5 major GPA; approval of the Department of Chemistry; placement by the Career Center.
  
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    CHEM 427 - Spectroscopy

    (3 cr) A study of the classical and quantum theories of the interaction of radiation with matter, including an introduction to the Schrodinger wave equation. The absorption and emission of radiation by atoms and molecules are treated, with particular emphasis being placed on ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectroscopy and resonance phenomena. Prerequisites: CHEM 207 , CHEM 209 , PHYS 201 , PHYS 202  and math through calculus.
  
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    CHEM 428 - Thermodynamics

    (2 cr) A study of the principles underlying the content and transfer of energy in physical and chemical reactions. The classical laws of thermodynamics are introduced, and the concepts of free energy, entropy, work, and enthalpy are defined and subjected to a careful quantitative treatment. Prerequisites: CHEM 207 , CHEM 209 , PHYS 201 , PHYS 202  and math through calculus.
  
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    CHEM 436 - Advanced Protein Chemistry

    (3 cr) The course is designed as a combination lecture, recitation and computer modeling components.The material to be covered will be an in-depth review of the structure and function relationships of proteins. Computer modeling, structure analysis and review of the current primary research literature will be used. The course is divided into four major topics of discussion: Part 1, a review of proteomics as it relates to the interrelationship of the different levels of protein structure; Part 2, folding patterns, analysis and prediction of structure; Part 3, specific topics in enzymology and protein chemistry; and Part 4, analysis of protein function by protein engineering and biophysical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 329 .
  
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    CHEM 440 - Physical Chemistry II

    (3cr) CHEM 440 examines chemical phenomena from fundamental physical principles. It is devoted to the structure of matter with emphasis on quantum chemistry. Topics include quantum mechanical principles, applications in translational, vibrational and rotational motions, atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: MATH 208  or CHEM 209  or PHYS 202  or PHYS 222 . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 440L  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 440L - Physical Chemistry II Laboratory

    (1cr) CHEM 440L is a laboratory course that covers more advanced physical chemistry laboratory methods. Topics include advanced calorimetry, spectroscopy, surface chemistry and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 209L . Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 440  be taken concurrently.
  
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    CHEM 450 - Research in Chemistry

    (1-3 cr) CHEM 450, Research in Chemistry, is the capstone and writing intensive course for chemistry majors. The student, with the guidance of a faculty advisor or internship mentor, will plan and execute a research project. The student will have the opportunity to work on a long-term project that could lead to a presentation at a scientific meeting or a publication in a scientific journal. All chemistry majors need to take at least four credits of CHEM 450.  These four credits should be spread over at least three semesters, and may enroll in only one credit in the first semester that it is taken.  The requirements for this course may be partially met with an approved external internship.  Approval of the Chemistry Department is required for enrollment in this course. Prerequisites: CHEM 315  and CHEM 315L .

     

     :   WM   CP 


College Student Development and Administration (Graduate)

  
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    CSDA 501 - Introduction to College Student Personnel

    (3 cr) The historical and philosophical development of the profession will be explored. Students will examine key documents of the profession and reflect on their own personal philosophies. The course includes an exploration of departments typically in Enrollment Management and Student Affairs, and review of the APA publication style.
  
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    CSDA 503 - Fundamentals of Enrollment Management

    (3 cr) This course will provide an in-depth introduction to enrollment management including the functions and roles of admissions, financial aid, and the registrar’s office.
  
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    CSDA 510 - History of Higher Education

    (3 cr) This course will provide an overview of the history of higher education, specifically focusing on American higher education and the development of student affairs work.
  
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    CSDA 511 - Governance and Administration in Higher Education

    (3 cr) This course will critically analyze and understand colleges and universities as formal organizations. Drawing upon various metaphors, models, and frameworks in the organizational theory, academic governance, and organizational change literatures, the course will focus broadly on how different approaches to organizing and governing inform and animate administrative practice and organizational change in colleges and universities.
  
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    CSDA 515 - Higher Education Administration and Legal Accountability

    (3cr) This course critically analyzes colleges and universities as formal organizations and introduces different approaches to administrative practice and organizational change. This course exposes students to a variety of current legal and ethical issues in higher education. Strategies to address major issues are discussed. Ties between administrative practice and legal implications are addressed.
  
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    CSDA 525 - Evaluation and Assessment Techniques

    (3 cr) This course is an overview of the fundamental principals of tests, assessment, and evaluations as they pertain to student affairs and enrollment management. Statistical measurement concepts, methodological principles in survey research, instrumentation, and broad assessment and evaluation issues will be explored
  
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    CSDA 531 - Student Leadership Development in College

    (3 cr) This course explores the conceptual and theoretical foundations of undergraduate student leadership development. Focus is given to historical foundations, developmental models, established and emerging research, and empirically-supported approaches that influence effective practices. A distinction is made between leadership skills, development, and education.
  
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    CSDA 550 - Student Development Theory

    (3 cr) This course will provide an introduction to student development in four major areas: psychosocial and identity development theories, cognitive-structural theories, typological theories, and environmental theories. Application of these theories to work in higher education settings will be emphasized.
  
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    CSDA 551 - Social Justice in Higher Education

    (3cr) This course will provide an introduction to multiculturalism and provide knowledge and skills to improve students’ multicultural competency. It will provide an opportunity for students to explore their own attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors as they relate to multiculturalism. Identity development models will be included. A special emphasis is placed on the higher education setting.  Previously titled Multicultural Issues. Prerequisites: CSDA 550  or permission of program coordinator.
  
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    CSDA 570 - Helping and Advising

    (3cr) This course provides an introduction to individual and group helping and advising in higher education environments. This course focuses on the application of micro-counseling skills to various populations in a variety of college settings.
  
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    CSDA 598 - Practicum

    (3 cr) The practicum is designed to provide practical experience in a setting in Enrollment Management or Student Affairs at a two- or four-year institution. Within this context, supervision is provided by the site supervisor (host), and individual/group processing of the experience is provided by the faculty instructor.
  
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    CSDA 599 - Special Topics: CSDA

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in college student development or higher education administration. This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 9 credits, with different topics.
  
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    CSDA 611 - Women in Higher Education

    (3 cr) This course will explore the role of women in higher education, their historical contributions, legacies, and influence in higher education. The course will examine Title IX, single gender institutions, “chilly climate,” and leadership in the student affairs profession. Issues of sexism and racism and other forms of discrimination are woven throughout the course.
  
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    CSDA 612 - Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Higher Education

    (3cr) This course will examine issues of sexual orientation at institutions. Student development and environmental theories will serve as a lens for this examination. The course will review the role sexual orientation and issues of discrimination have played in the experiences of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students, faculty and staff. Previously titled Sexual Orientation Issues in Higher Education.
  
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    CSDA 613 - The Higher Education Student

    (3 cr) An examination is made of the culture of undergraduate students in American higher education to prepare professionals for the clients they will serve. Focus is given to the changing student clientele and its subgroups and cultures. Undergraduate characteristics, attitudes and values, and broad issues regarding their participation in the educational experience will be explored.
  
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    CSDA 650 - Advanced Student Development Theory

    (3 cr) This course will further explore psychosocial, cognitive, and typological models and theories. An introduction to environmental theories will be explored. Application to work in student affairs and enrollment management is emphasized.
  
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    CSDA 660 - Legal and Ethical Accountability in Higher Education

    (3 cr) This course is designed to expose students to a variety of current legal and ethical issues in higher education that have a dramatic impact for the profession and on work as educators. Strategies to address major issues are discussed. Prerequisites: CSDA 501 .
  
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    CSDA 678 - CSDA Capstone

    (3cr) This course provides a culminating experience for individuals in the College Student Development and Administration program. The course applies knowledge from other courses and contemporary higher education issues in the program to a semester-long project. Previously titled Interventions Capstone. Prerequisites: CSDA 525 .
  
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    CSDA 699 - Special Topics: CSDA

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in college student development or higher education administration. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits, with different topics.

Communication

  
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    COMM 202 - Fundamentals of Speech

    (3 cr) A required course for all students with focus upon the skills of sending and receiving clear messages. Audience analysis, the organization of the message, listening awareness, and the management of communication apprehension are foremost among the course objectives. Students participate in communication exercises and deliver a variety of speeches of different formats.

     :   HM   MD   GL

  
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    COMM 203 - Communication and New Media

    (3 cr) New media are changing the ways we live and work. Communication professionals must be fluent across media platforms and ready to embrace perpetual change. Communication and New Media is a course that examines media technologies and their cultural implications. The course is designed to provide students with a survey of the field and an introduction to digital media production and media literacy.

    CORE CODES :   HM   CK

  
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    COMM 204 - Debate/Competitive Speaking

    (3cr) A course which insists that competition accelerates rhetorical competencies in debate and individual events. In the former, students compete against teams from other colleges by debating topics which have been chosen at the national level. In the latter, students display their understanding of literary texts as well as current events by competing against other students in faculty-judged circumstances. In both debate and individual events, overnight travel is likely.  Previously COMM 331-Intercollegiate Forensics. This course is repeatable. Prerequisite/corequisite: COMM 202 .
  
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    COMM 222 - Voice and Diction

    (3 cr) This course is designed to improve speaking through the understanding and application of principles for proper breathing techniques, projection, articulation, inflection, and pronunciation. Through readings in dramatic literature, poetic and prose, as well as the application of theories in vocal production, the course improves voice quality as it develops the student’s reading and speaking abilities. Prerequisites: COMM 202 , 203 .
  
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    COMM 302 - Narrative Screenwriting

    (3 cr) This course is designed to educate students in the technical and aesthetic practices of narrative screenwriting, including story structure analysis and development, pitching, treatments, and professional screenplay formatting. (Formerly titled Writing for Mass Media 1999-2009; Narrative Scriptwriting 2009-2011).

     

    CORE CODES :   WM

  
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    COMM 304 - History of Film

    (3 cr) Historical and critical survey of the development of motion pictures as an industry, art form, and a distinctive medium of mass communication.

     

    CORE CODES:   WM

  
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    COMM 305 - History of TV

    (3 cr) Historical and critical survey of U.S. television as an industry, mass medium, and cultural form.

     

    CORE CODES:   WM

  
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    COMM 306 - History of Advertising

    (3cr) Historical and critical survey of advertising as an industry, mass medium, and cultural form.
  
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    COMM 308 - Interpersonal Communications

    (3 cr) This course is a survey of the basic concepts of interpersonal communication including self-awareness, perceptions, emotions, and conflict resolution. The focus of the course is upon the analysis of communication skills and human behavior in relation to others. Through the observation of oral and nonverbal behaviors, the student will learn to improve message transmissions, thereby leading to personal improvement.
  
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    COMM 310 - Conducting Business Meetings and Group Discussions

    (3 cr) This course is a study of communication behavior in business meetings and in group situations. Appropriate procedures for conducting meetings and discussions will be emphasized. Problem-solving techniques, styles of leadership, and personality barriers that inhibit effective communication will be discussed. The student will have the opportunity to fully participate in the meeting or discussion as leader and member.
  
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    COMM 312 - Presentations in Business and Professional Contexts

    (3 cr) The clear dissemination of information will be the focus of this course. Emphasis will be given to the organization and presentation for business and professional speaking situations. Methods of persuasive strategies and appropriate visuals will be studied.
  
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    COMM 315 - Organizational Communications

    (3 cr) This course offers the study of communication as it applies to formal organizations. Topics for lecture, discussion, and written analysis include organizational climate and structure, employer-employee communication, and management styles. Emphasis will be given to time management, written and oral communications within organizations, and the development of social communications as it relates to organizational contexts.
  
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    COMM 320 - Presentations for Media

    (3 cr) This course emphasizes improving the individual’s nonverbal communication and vocal skills for the broadcast media. Students combine broadcast theory with practical skills to enhance understanding of and performance of all types of broadcast material. Prerequisites: COMM 202  and COMM 203 .
  
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    COMM 321 - Public Relations Principles

    (3cr) An introduction to the principles, concepts, theoretical underpinnings, and emerging trends in public relations. Students learn the responsibilities and functions of the public relations practitioner, examine various career paths, and are introduced to the strategic communication concentration in the Department of Communication.  The course explores public relations impacts on organizations and society, the history and development of public relations, and key ethical considerations the industry faces. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of the strategic process of public relations.
  
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    COMM 322 - Social Media

    (3cr) The course examines the pervasive impact social media is having on our society, with specific interest in the implications and applications of social media for strategic media professionals. Focus is given to investigating the theoretical and cultural aspects of social media with an aim toward understanding how this communication form has changed our relationship between individuals, organizations, and society. Prerequisites: COMM 321 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 325 - Critical Thinking for Conflict Resolution

    (3 cr) This course emphasizes the necessity for reasoned thinking and stresses the need for understanding conflict and its resolution. Methods of negotiation and mediation will be studied as well as advocacy theory. The analysis of issues, argument development, and critical listening will be key components of the course.
  
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    COMM 326 - Radio Practicum

    (3cr) This course introduces students to practical skills in policies, strategies, and broadcasting techniques of radio station operations. Prepares students for participation in the university’s on-air radio station, WSHC. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    COMM 329 - Sound Design

    (3 cr) A course in the creation and critique of audio productions for radio and video. The course explores both the theory and practice of acoustic communication and sound design. It considers both the aesthetics of electroacoustic communication and the social, cultural, and institutional contexts of radio broadcasting.
  
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    COMM 333 - Music Video

    (3 cr) Music Video outlines the history, significance, and impact of music video as a commercial commodity and aesthetic style. The cultural impact of music video on popular culture will be studied and students will engage in music video production as a form of writing and inscribing experience.
  
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    COMM 335 - Writing Across Platforms

    (3cr) Students learn to write effectively across various platforms in today’s computer-mediated world. Emphasis is given to clear and effective communication and professional standards as well as the need to tailor the message to the audience and the platform through which it is communicated.

     

    CORE CODES :  WM

  
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    COMM 339 - Public Relations Writing and Design

    (3 cr) Collaboration with the graphic design program provides insight into the function of public relations. Effective communication strategies will include newsletters, pamphlets, brochures, and Web pages as well as writing technique and style for print and broadcast. Prerequisites:  COMM 202 , COMM 203 , COMM 302 .
  
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    COMM 343 - Graphic Novel

    (3 cr) Once the domain of sticky-fingered kids clutching nickels and dimes, comics have grown up and are establishing themselves as a fast-growing and respected literary genre. Students enrolled in Graphic Novel will explore this cultural phenomenon by analyzing works such as Art Spiegelman’s Maus and Craig Thompson’s Blankets. Students also will write and design their own graphic novels. Drawing skills are not mandatory for success in this class, as even non-artists can produce compelling stories using the imaging and layout software provided.
  
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    COMM 344 - Game Design

    (3 cr) This course focuses on the structure/theory of game design and the analysis of games’ role in modern society. Using readings, playing of games, and in-class exercises, students will explore what makes meaningful play. Rule systems, game culture, and history will be covered. Students will learn game design by creating their own games. No programming knowledge is need for this class.
  
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    COMM 345 - Animation and Communication

    (3 cr) Computer-generated (CGI) animation has become standard fare in TV, film advertising, forensics/courtroom reenactment, education/training, gaming, Web design, and online media. This course explores the history and craft of computer animation via animation production with an emphasis on animation as a means of expressing perception (i.e., communication) and the discourses of animation as art and entertainment. Topics include key-framing, storytelling, storyboarding, lighting, compositing, and moviemaking as well as working with motion capture, particle effects, dynamic simulation, sound design, automation, and other facets of digital animation as they emerge.
  
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    COMM 346 - Motion Graphics

    (3 cr) In today’s digital environment, savvy communicators exploit the synergy of the written word in combination with sound and the moving image. This course will focus on the study and creation of motion graphics in fine art, film, and advertising. How do motion graphics differ from other modes of communication? How does the introduction of text affect audience experience? While seeking answers to questions like these, students will explore groundbreaking work by visionaries such as Saul Bass while learning software that allows them to express their own messages in a professional manner.
  
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    COMM 347 - Special Effects

    (3cr) In this course students will become familiar with various techniques used to create special effects in film and video. The curriculum will include a survey of historical examples from prominent special effects artists, as well as hands-on creation of student projects.
  
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    COMM 348 - News Practicum

    (3 cr) News Practicum is a course in which students study the practice and politics of news reporting and journalism using traditional and new media.
  
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    COMM 349 - New Media Practicum

    (3 cr) New Media Practicum is a course in which students practice new media production. Topics will be announced.
  
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    COMM 350 - Digital Filmmaking

    (3 cr) A course in video production that investigates the theory and practice of filmmaking, including writing, directing, lighting, cinematography, editing, and sound design. Previously titled Single Camera Production.
  
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    COMM 352 - Computer-Mediated Communication

    (3 cr) This course focuses on the study, practice, and criticism of computer-mediated communication. Students will develop projects using a variety of digital technologies, focusing primarily on the Web. The course is designed to teach students to effectively use these technologies, to study the impact on society, and to think critically about that impact.
  
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    COMM 354 - Experimental Video

    (3 cr) Experimental Video is an introduction to the ideological and aesthetic issues surrounding alternative modes of digital cinematography production.
  
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    COMM 360 - TV Production

    (3 cr) A course in video production that investigates the theory and practice of studio productions, such as news and talk shows. Attention will be given to directing and producing audio and camera for multi-camera production.  Previously titled Studio Production. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    COMM 392 - Cooperative Education in Communications

    (1-6 cr) A capstone course involving all that the student has learned during enrollment in the program. Working through the Office of Cooperative Education and coordinating plans with the communications faculty, the student engages in an intensive co-op with an appropriate agency. Prerequisites: COMM 202  and COMM 203  and written approval from the Department of Communications.
  
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    COMM 400 - Media Law and Ethics

    (3cr) An exploration of communication law intended to add to the student’s appreciation of the legal process and its historical underpinnings. This course provides information designed to help communications specialists make informed judgments in situations with ethical and legal consequences.
  
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    COMM 402 - Seminar in Communications

    (3cr) This seminar entails an examination of a specific topic from the field of communication, exploring various theories and methods. Topics for the seminar are announced during early registration. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    COMM 403 - Media Studies

    (3 cr) A course that investigates the significance of contemporary media, cultural ideals, beliefs, and values. The course considers the significance and impact of media on our experience of self, community, culture, society, and world. The course will engage students in the critical practices of reading, decoding, and interpreting cultural texts and practices.
 

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