Jun 15, 2024  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Communication

  
  • COMM 404 - Gender and Film

    (3cr) This class applies a critical lens to gendered film representations in order to come to terms with the genealogy and structure of heteronormativity and whiteness and to seek out images that radically challenge these conventions. Gender and Film will investigate a variety of exploratory paradigms and sex/gender identities in classic and contemporary work, surveying literature that interprets and theorizes on the confluence of identity, body, sexuality, gender, class and race.
  
  • COMM 405 - Advertising, Writing, and Design

    (3 cr) Professional advertising copywriting and advertising design philosophy combine to give the student background in the creation of print and broadcast advertising. Collaboration with the graphic design program allows original advertising campaigns to be developed. Prerequisites:  COMM 202 , COMM 203 , COMM 302 .
  
  • COMM 406 - Advertising and Imagery

    (3 cr) This course explores the significance and influence of advertising, public relations, and public opinion on contemporary culture. The history, institutional practice, and aesthetics of advertising, public relations, and public opinion will be studied. The course will consider the social, political, cultural, and personal dimensions of interpreting advertising, public relations, and public opinion.
  
  • COMM 408 - Communications for the Consultant

    (3 cr) This course is designed to allow the student to explore the career path of consulting. The emphasis will be on communications in business as related to organizations and the client. The focus will include the analysis of specific communication problems an organization might have as well as designing communication exercises and workshops to address those problem areas.
  
  • COMM 410 - Intercultural Communications

    (3 cr) This is a course which focuses on building a broad-based understanding of communications similarities and differences between and among cultures. Students will explore areas of intercultural communication arising from life situations such as business, politics, family, travel, customs, and social traditions. Students will also engage in a comparative analysis of cultures through the communications of speech, music, literature, film, dance, and language.
  
  • COMM 420 - Advanced Production

    (3 cr) A course in which students develop and produce supervised original projects in electronic media. Projects may involve broadcasting, sound design, video, and multimedia. Prerequisites: COMM 329  or COMM 350 .
  
  • COMM 435 - Media and Audience Analytics

    (3cr) This course examines the role of research as a critical component of public relations and strategic communications. Students learn skills necessary to plan, conduct, and interpret basic research. Both qualitative and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis are explored. An emphasis is placed on both understanding audiences as well as analyzing media content. Students learn to conduct research across communication modalities including through interpersonal and computer-mediated means. Previously titled Media Research (1999-2012), and Communications Research (2013 - 2019). Prerequisites: COMM 321 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • COMM 447 - Advanced Internet Media

    (3 cr) This course expands on the study, practice, and criticism of computer-mediated communication. Students will build upon skills developed in COMM 352 , advancing their knowledge of Internet-based technologies. Prerequisites: COMM 352 .
  
  • COMM 450 - Internship in Communication

    (3cr) A capstone course in experiential learning. The student engages in an intensive internship with a field appropriate agency. May be repeated once. Prerequisites: Written approval from the Department of Communications.
  
  • COMM 451 - Senior Capstone Preparation

    (1cr) This course prepares Communication students to undertake the work of the Senior Capstone Project, the final requirement for graduation from the Program in Communication. The course will engage students in the initial research process, the identification, development, and planning of appropriate capstone projects, selection of a faculty director, and information the expectations of the Capstone Project. This course will culminate in the production of a capstone proposal and plan that will be submitted for approval to enroll in COMM 461 : Senior Capstone Project. Students are expected to complete a two-course sequence COMM 451 and 461, which must be taken in successive semesters in the last year of study. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
  • COMM 461 - Senior Capstone Project

    (2cr) A required course for all communication seniors that brings together communication theory and practical experience into a final project and presentation. Original projects may include, but are not limited to, digital films, podcasts, papers, Web sites, and social media campaigns. Projects will be presented before the department faculty, students, and the campus community. A faculty member, selected by the student, and the course instructor will serve as advisors for the project. The course will serve as a final assessment of communication skills. Students are expected to complete a 2-course sequence, COMM 451  and COMM 461, which must be taken in successive semesters in the last year of study.  Previously Senior Capstone, 3cr. Prerequisites: COMM 451  or Permission of Instructor.

     

    CORE CODES :   CP

  
  • COMM 470 - Strategic Campaigns

    (3cr) This course expands upon the study of public relations by examining and critiquing public relations campaigns. Students build upon skills developed in Public Relations Principles and Communication Research to advance their knowledge of the process of planning, executing, and evaluating strategic campaigns. Prerequisites: COMM 321 , and one of the following:  COMM 322 , COMM 335 , or COMM 435 ; or permission of instructor.

Computer and Information Sciences

  
  • CIS 100 - Freshman Seminar

    (1 cr) This course provides beginning freshman students with information and tools to prepare them for a successful life as a student. This course is aimed at developing the cognitive skills required in computer, mathematics, and engineering courses. The activities in this course are designed to introduce the student to an academic support system through which freshman students can explore various concentrations in computer science, mathematics, and engineering and learn academic success strategies including developing a support network. This course also helps students develop good wellness habits that have lifelong benefits.

    CORE CODE: FY

  
  • CIS 102 - Microcomputer Applications

    (3 cr) A survey of computer hardware, software, and Internet/Web social and ethical implications of the use and misuse of the computer. Hands-on experiences with software applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, and databases.
  
  • CIS 104 - Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences

    (3 cr) Surveys issues related to hardware and software, operating systems and applications, networks and security, databases and analytics, web programming and graphics, and programming languages, as well as ethical, global and social issues related to computing. Provides practical programming experience using variables and conditional logic in a modern programming language such as Java. Prerequisites: Satisfactory math placement score  , or MATH 105  or MATH 108  or MATH 155  or higher.
  
  • CIS 211 - Computer Language Concepts

    (3 cr) Write programs using loops, arrays, strings, and 2D graphics. Understand data types and their binary representations. Apply techniques of object-oriented design. Learn to solve complex problems through the composition of modular units of code. Use Java, an interactive debugger, and an integrated development environment. Prerequisites:  CIS 104 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 240 - Introduction to Cyber Security

    (3cr) This is the first course dedicated to computer and information security in the Internet era. It covers essential digital security related topics such as hacking and attacks and counter measures, VPNs, firewalls, intrusion detection, Web security, and vulnerability assessment. Students will learn basic knowledge of security and understand the core security terminology, and gain  basic skills to prevent basic digital security problems and risks. Prerequisites: CIS 104  or permission from instructor.
  
  • CIS 287 - System Analysis and Design

    (3 cr) The system life cycle, starting with the requirements statement and ending with system extinction/replacement. Primary emphasis on the logical design phase of an information system. Includes explanations of both the traditional design approach and prototyping. Advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are examined. Prerequisites: CIS 104  or DATA 118 .
  
  • CIS 292 - Cooperative Work Experience in Computer Science and Engineering

    (1 cr) A supervised work experience in which the student is employed in an approved professional position with an industry, firm, or government agency. A final written report and a presentation are required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA in the major; 2.3 GPA overall; and the recommendation of the student’s advisor.
  
  • CIS 301 - Networking

    (3cr) Students will learn the fundamental concepts of networking. Case studies and hands-on projects will consider networking topics including hardware, protocols, architecture, media, design, implementation, and troubleshooting, maintaining, and upgrading computer networks. Cyber security in networking, OSI and TCP/IP model and routing concepts. Previously offered as CIS 234 Introduction to Networking. Prerequisites: CIS 104 .
  
  • CIS 302 - Windows Programming

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of creating the Windows graphical user interface (GUI). Students create powerful, full-featured applications which utilize the key features of Microsoft Windows, including ActiveXdata objects (ADO.NET), Multiple Document Interface (MDI), Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLs), and graphics. Prerequisites: CIS 211  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 310 - Information Security

    (3 cr) Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts of information security including the establishment and implementation of an organization-wide security policy which is designed to protect the information assets of an organization. This course provides the student with the skills necessary to enforce an organization security policy and lays the foundation for continued study in the areas of information security. Prerequisites: CIS 301  or CIT 234  or CPE 234 .
  
  • CIS 314 - Advanced Computer Language Concepts

    (3 cr) Explores language concepts such as compilers, interpreters, parameter passing, variable scope, and multi-threaded programming. Compares Java with other languages. Applies object-oriented theory, software frameworks, design patterns, UML, refactoring, unit testing, and version control. Students write programs to parse data files and load data structores. Prerequisites: CIS 211 .
  
  • CIS 321 - Data and File Structures

    (4 cr) The topics in this course include definitions and implementations of basic data structures including linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs and their applications; recursion as a algorithm design tool; and file organization and access techniques. Prerequisites: CIS 314  and MATH 254 .
  
  • CIS 324 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

    (3 cr) An overview of artificial intelligence, its tools and techniques. Includes such subjects as fuzzy logic, nonprocedural programming, basic search techniques, automated reasoning, and expert systems. Programming in Prolog or LISP and the creation of knowledge-based systems using expert system software shells. Emphasis on the application of artificial intelligence techniques to business and industrial problems. Prerequisites: CIS 321 .
  
  • CIS 331 - Programming Languages

    (3 cr) The syntax and semantics of programming languages. Topics include formal specification of syntax, declarations, binding, allocation, data structures and data types, control structures, control and data flow, the implementation and execution of programs, functional programming and imperative programming. Other possible topics include nonprocedural and logic programming, object-oriented programming, and program verification. Programming projects will provide experience in a number of languages. Prerequisites: CIS 321 .
  
  • CIS 332 - Web Programming I

    (3 cr) Students learn new skills, languages, and concepts required to create applications that use the World Wide Web as the basis for the user’s interaction with the application. This is the first of the two-course sequence on this topic and focuses on client-side application programming (JavaScript, HTML/XML, CSS, DHTML, DOM, and Java). Prerequisites: CIS 104 .
  
  • CIS 334 - Web Programming II

    (3 cr) This is the second semester of the two-course sequence on Web programming. It focuses on the server-side application programming in general and database in particular. It covers ASP.NET and VBScript as well as advanced topics such as XML Web service, SOAP, cookies, and security. Three-tier architecture of Web-based applications will be discussed. Other server-side programming languages such as PHP may also be covered. Prerequisites: CIS 332  and CIS 302  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CIS 361 - E-Commerce

    (3 cr) This course covers concepts, IT skills and tools, and social and ethical issues encountered performing e-commerce in a contemporary fashion, with focus on technical issues rather than business practices.  Also included are topics such as EDI, VAN, ExtraNet, shopping cart, database, and security. Prerequisites: CIS 301  and CIS 332 .
  
  • CIS 372 - Introduction to Biometrics

    (3 cr) An introduction to the basics of biometrics and investigation of the mainstream biometric technologies being used. This course explains the underlying image processing concepts required to understand biometric techniques. Also included are ethics, privacy concerns, and the future of biometric technologies. Prerequisites: CIS 104 .
  
  • CIS 386 - Computer Organization

    (4 cr) Students will learn the principles of computer organization. Topics include the functional components of a computer, memory organization, auxiliary storage, system interconnection, digital logic, assembly language programming, and evolution and future trends of computer organization. Weekly laboratories will illustrate computer organization concepts and techniques. Prerequisites: CIS 211  and CIS 301 .
  
  • CIS 388 - Database Management Systems

    (4 cr) The design and maintenance of a computerized database management system. Includes all operations such as design, creation, searching, sorting, and editing that must be performed on both sequential and direct access files and sets of files. Examines advantages and disadvantages of tree, network, and relational data structures. Coverage of query languages, data dictionaries, and security and privacy considerations. Prerequisites: CIS 211 .
  
  • CIS 390 - Operating Systems

    (3 cr) An introduction to the fundamentals of operating systems across computing platforms. Topics include process and storage management, protection and security, and distributed systems. Format principles are complemented with surveys of contemporary operating systems (including UNIX). Prerequisites: CIS 386  or CIT 385  or CPE 386 .
  
  • CIS 392 - Cooperative Work Experience in Programming

    (1-2) A supervised work experience in which the student is employed in an approved professional position with an industry, firm, or government agency. A final written report and a presentation are required. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credits. Prerequisites: CIS 292 /CPE 292  with a pass grade and positive comments from both the faculty and on-site advisors; 3.0 GPA in the major; 2.3 GPA overall; and the recommendation of the student’s advisor.
  
  • CIS 395 - Introduction to Cryptography and Computer Security

    (3 cr) This course covers basic concepts of cryptology and coding theory, historical ciphers, modern symmetric ciphers such as DES and 3DES, public cryptography such as RSA and elliptic curve cryptosystems and their applications in computer and information security, including data integrity and authentication, digital signature, key exchange, and key management. Also covered are physical security, smart cards and biometrics, and security policy and documentation. Prerequisites: MATH 254 ; and CIS 301  or CIT 234  or CPE 234 ; or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 396 - Internship in CIS

    (1-6cr) This course awards academic credit(s) for department-approved internship experiences in a discipline-related work environment. Students will be able to apply their knowledge and skills acquired in classroom settings to real world research and application scenarios. A student wishing to enroll in this course must submit a written research proposal for approval to the advisor and to the chair of the department of computer science, mathematics, and engineering. CIS 396 is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of department chair.
  
  • CIS 405 - Computer Graphics

    (3 cr) Basic concepts such as graphics systems, modeling, and pipelines are introduced. Students also will learn to program in a popular graphics library, such as OpenGL or DirectX. Topics include basic 2-D and 3-D graphics programming, basic animation and controls, texture mapping, lights, and materials. Prerequisites: CIS 302 .
  
  • CIS 418 - Management Information Systems

    (3 cr) An integration of the material covered in previous programming and systems courses. An examination of modern management information systems in a business setting. Topics include structured decision systems, decision support systems, information systems acquisition and management, database management systems, and the role of information processing systems in business decisions. Prerequisites: CIS 287 .
  
  • CIS 419 - Data Communication and Computer Networks

    (3 cr) This course introduces the role of data communications and computer networks in a computer science environment. Special topics include concepts in fundamental communications; data communication hardware; serial, parallel, Ethernet, and network configurations; protocols and software; microcomputer communications; and computer networks. Prerequisites: CIS 301  or CIT 234  or CPE 234 .
  
  • CIS 421 - Computer Architecture

    (3 cr) Topics include information representation, tags, check bits, floating-point arithmetic, instruction sets, RISC vs CISC, ALU design, bit slicing, microprogrammed control, microinstruction types, microprogram optimization, cache memories, interleaved memories, communication methods, bus control and timing, input-output, programmed I/O, interrupts and DMA, parallel and vector processors, pipelines, shared vs distributed memory, interconnection networks, and hypercube computers. Prerequisites: CIS 386  and CPE /ENGR 305 ; or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 423 - Server Operation Systems and System Programming

    (3 cr) Students will learn the principles of current server operating systems and system level programming skills. The role of servers in enterprise networks and the design of modern server computer systems will be covered. Students also will learn how to use system level programming languages, such as C, Shell, Perl, etc., to automate repetitive system administration tasks. Prerequisites: CIS 395  or CIS 386  or CIT 385  or CPE 386  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 431 - Algorithms

    (3 cr) The topics of this course include basic tools for algorithm analysis including asymptotic notations, lower and upper bounds, and recursive relations; advanced data structures; analysis of recursive algorithms; analysis of algorithms for searching and sorting; analysis of graph and geometric algorithms; analysis of numerical algorithms; study of NP-complete problems; and study of parallel algorithms. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in CIS 321 Data and File Structures , or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 433 - Microprocessor System Design and Lab

    (4 cr) This course is a basic introduction to microprocessor/microcontroller programming using the INTEL 80xxx series of microprocessor/microcontrollers. The course has a strong lab component where students will be exposed to programming the INTEL 80xxx series microprocessors in addition to learning their basic architecture. Topics include Assembly language programming, instruction time cycles, memory interfacing, input-output interfacing, data converters A/D and D/A, interrupts, general purpose programmable peripherals, etc. If time permits, students will be asked to do a lab project in which the microprocessor/microcontroller is used in a real-life application, e.g., a digital thermometer. Prerequisites: ENGR 305  and CIS 386 .
  
  • CIS 434 - Cloud Networking

    (3cr) This course is to provide a fundamental coverage of communication networks with a focus on networking technologies enabling cloud computing and service oriented architecture. Students will learn how to design, build, and troubleshoot inter/intra networks that enable virtual networks on a shared infrastructure. It also covers physical transmission options, efficient and effective transmission of big data, low latency communication in wired and wireless networking, cloud network security, and other subjects related to cloud networking. Previously titled Inter/Intra Networking. Prerequisites: CIS 419  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 441 - Automata Theory

    (3 cr) Topics include regular grammars, finite automata, context-free grammars, pushdown automata, and Turing machines; introductory treatment of computable and non-computable functions; and halting problems. Prerequisites: CIS 331 .
  
  • CIS 450 - Web Design Studio

    (3 cr) This course is designed for students to learn through hands-on experience and production. Students will form teams to learn advanced techniques for Web site creation and design, programming, and integration. Languages, tools, and technology for creating advanced Web applications will be covered. Prerequisites: CIS 332  or CIS 334  or CIS 361 .
  
  • CIS 455 - Game Design and Programming

    (3 cr) This course introduces computer game design principles and techniques such as prototyping, interface design, implementation of functionalities in C++, and play-testing. Game graphics will also be introduced. Topics include an overview of Photoshop for game scene design, basic techniques for game texture creation, and case studies. Prerequisites: CIS 302  and CIS 321 .
  
  • CIS 481 - Topics in Computer and Information Sciences

    (3 cr) Examines various topics in different aspects of computer and information sciences. Such topics may include microprocessor systems, performance analysis of computer systems, computer graphics, compiler design, parallel and distributed processing, computer security, expert systems, natural language processing, neural networks, or intelligent tutoring systems. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
  
  • CIS 482 - Real Time and Embedded System Design

    (3 cr) A general introduction to real-time operating systems and embedded system design. Prerequisites: CIS 421 .
  
  • CIS 485 - Directed Research in Computer and Information Sciences

    (3 cr) Design and development of a project in some area of computer and information sciences. Each student enrolling in this course must select a computer and information sciences faculty advisor who will be responsible for approving, guiding, and evaluating the project. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

     :   WM   CP

  
  • CIS 486 - Network Security

    (4 cr) Students will learn how to protect computer networks from internal and external digital threats by studying security concepts and techniques. Topics include fundamental concepts of cryptography, cryptographic key distribution and management, authentication protocols, digital signatures, security policy, virtual private networks (VPNs) and their implications to security, and protection of Internet and Web-based systems and services. Weekly hands-on laboratories will investigate computer network security techniques. Prerequisites: CIS 423  or CIS 419  or CIT 419  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIS 487 - Software Engineering

    (3 cr) Introduces the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for object-oriented analysis and design, object-oriented life cycle models, testing, maintenance, and performance measurement of object-oriented software projects. Students will work in teams to develop object-oriented software projects. Prerequisites: CIS 321 .
  
  • CIS 492 - Cooperative Work Experience in Computer Science and Engineering

    (1-3 cr) A supervised work experience in which the student is employed in an approved professional position with an industry, firm, or government agency. A final written report and a presentation are required. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisites: CIS 392 /CPE 392  with a pass grade and positive comments from both the faculty and on-site advisors; 3.0 GPA in the major; 2.3 GPA overall; and the recommendation of the student’s advisor.

Computer and Information Technology

  
  • CIT 234 - Introduction to Networking

    (3 cr) Students will learn the fundamental concepts of networking. Case studies and hands-on projects will consider networking topics including hardware, protocols, architecture, media, design, implementation, and troubleshooting, maintaining, and upgrading computer networks. Prerequisites: CIS 104 .
  
  • CIT 310 - Information Security

    (3 cr) Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts of information security including the establishment and implementation of an organization-wide security policy which is designed to protect the information assets of an organization. This course provides the student with the skills necessary to enforce an organization security policy and lays the foundation for continued study in the areas of information security. Prerequisites: CIT 234  or CIS 301  or CPE 234  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIT 332 - Web Programming

    (3 cr) Students will learn new skills, languages, and concepts required to create applications that use the World Wide Web as the basis for the user’s interaction with the application. This is the first of the two-course sequence on this topic and focuses on client-side application programming (JavaScript, HTML/XML, CSS, DHTML, DOM, and Java). Prerequisites: CIS 211  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIT 334 - Web Programming II

    (3 cr) This is the second semester of the two-course sequence on Web programming. It focuses on the server-side application programming in general and database in particular. It covers ASP.NET and VBScript as well as advanced topics such as XML Web service, SOAP, cookies, and security. Three-tier architecture of Web-based applications will be discussed. Other server-side programming languages such as PHP may also be covered. Prerequisites: CIT 332  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIT 361 - E-Commerce

    (3 cr) This course covers concepts, IT skills and tools, and social and ethical issues encountered performing e-commerce in a contemporary fashion, with focus on technical issues rather than business practices.  Also included are topics such as EDI, VAN, ExtraNet, shopping cart, database, and security. Prerequisites: CIT 234  and CIT 332 
  
  • CIT 372 - Introduction to Biometrics

    (3 cr) An introduction to the basics of biometrics and investigation of the mainstream biometric technologies being used. This course explains the underlying image processing concepts required to understand biometric techniques. Also included are ethics, privacy concerns, and the future of biometric technologies. Prerequisites: CIS 104 .
  
  • CIT 385 - Computer System Design

    (4 cr) This course provides a broad and in-depth coverage of a variety of computer hardware and software concepts, with focus on designing contemporary computing systems. Topics covered include binary system, Boolean algebra and digital logic design, instruction set architecture and processor design, memory, input/output and storage systems, distributed system, and advanced topics. Prerequisites: CIS 104  and MATH 155 .
  
  • CIT 388 - Database Management Systems

    (4 cr) The design and maintenance of a computerized database management system will be examined, including all operations such as design, creation, searching, sorting, and editing that must be performed on both sequential and direct access files and sets of files. Also examined will be the advantages of tree, network, and relational data structures as well as query languages, data dictionaries, and security and privacy considerations. Prerequisites: CIS 104  or DATA 118 .
  
  • CIT 418 - Management Information Systems

    (3 cr) An integration of the material covered in previous programming and systems courses and an examination of modern management information systems in a business setting. Topics covered will include structured decision systems, decision support systems, information systems acquisition and management, database management systems, and the role of information processing systems in business decisions. Prerequisites: CIS 287 .
  
  • CIT 419 - Data Communication and Computer Networks

    (3 cr) This course introduces the role of data communications and computer networks in a computer science environment. Special topics include concepts in fundamental communications; data communication hardware; serial, parallel, Ethernet, and network configurations; protocols and software; microcomputer communications; and computer networks. Prerequisites: CIT 234  or CIS 301  or CPE 234  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CIT 450 - Web Design Studio

    (3 cr) This course is designed for students to learn through hands-on experience and production. Students will form teams to learn advanced techniques for Web site creation and design, programming, and integration. Languages, tools, and technology for creating advanced Web applications will be covered. Prerequisites: CIT 334 .
  
  • CIT 486 - Network Security

    (4 cr) Students will learn how to protect computer networks from internal and external digital threats by studying security concepts and techniques. Topics include fundamental concepts of cryptography, cryptographic key distribution and management, authentication protocols, digital signatures, security policy, virtual private networks (VPNs) and their implications to security, and protection of Internet and Web-based systems and services. Weekly hands-on laboratories will investigate computer network security techniques. Prerequisites: CIS 423  or CIS 419  or CIT 419  or permission of instructor.

Computer Engineering

  
  • CPE 221 - Introduction to Electrical Engineering

    (3 cr) Topics include electrical engineering units, circuit elements, circuit laws, measurement principles, mesh and node equations, network theorems, energy storage elements, RC and RL circuits, unit step response, and second order circuits. Prerequisites: ENGR 102  and MATH 207 .
  
  • CPE 222 - Electrical Engineering Laboratory

    (1 cr) A laboratory course in electrical engineering, 3 hours per week, to be taken simultaneously with CPE 221 .
  
  • CPE 224 - Electrical Circuits

    (3 cr) Introduction to network analysis including sinusoidal (AC) steady state, average and RMS values, phasors, polyphase systems, complex frequency, network frequency response, two port networks and transformers, Fourier methods, and Laplace Transforms. Prerequisites: CPE 221  and MATH 208 .
  
  • CPE 225 - Electrical Circuits Laboratory

    (1 cr) A laboratory course in electrical circuits, 3 hours per week, to be taken simultaneously with CPE 224 .
  
  • CPE 234 - Introduction to Networking

    (3 cr) Students will learn the fundamental concepts of networking. Case studies and hands-on projects will consider networking topics including hardware, protocols, architecture, media, design, implementation, and troubleshooting, maintaining, and upgrading computer networks. Prerequisites: CIS 104 .
  
  • CPE 287 - System Analysis and Design

    (3 cr) The system life cycle, starting with the requirements statement and ending with system extinction/replacement. Primary emphasis on the logical design phase of an information system. Includes explanations of both the traditional design approach and prototyping. Advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are examined. Prerequisites: CIS 211 .
  
  • CPE 292 - Cooperative Work Experience in Computer Science and Engineering

    (1 cr) A supervised work experience in which the student is employed in an approved professional position with an industry, firm, or government agency. A final written report and a presentation are required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA in the major; 2.3 GPA overall; and the recommendation of the student’s advisor.
  
  • CPE 305 - Digital Logic Design and Lab

    (4 cr) Boolean algebra; combinational and sequential circuits, minimization techniques; design-and-build logic subsystems, such as decoders, multiplexers, adders, multipliers, and counters; use of CAD tools. Prerequisites: ENGR 102  or MATH 254  or permission of instructor.
  
  • CPE 386 - Computer Organization

    (4 cr) Students will learn the principles of computer organization. Topics include the functional components of a computer, memory organization, auxiliary storage, system interconnection, digital logic, assembly language programming, and evolution and future trends of computer organization. Weekly laboratories will illustrate computer organization concepts and techniques. Prerequisites: CIS 211  and CPE 234 .
  
  • CPE 392 - Cooperative Work Experience in Computer Science and Engineering

    (1-2) A supervised work experience in which the student is employed in an approved professional position with an industry, firm, or government agency. A final written report and a presentation are required. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credits. Prerequisites: CIS 292 /CPE 292  with a pass grade and positive comments from both the faculty and on-site advisors; 3.0 GPA in the major; 2.3 GPA overall; and the recommendation of the student’s advisor.
  
  • CPE 421 - Computer Architecture

    (3 cr) Topics include information representation, tags, check bits, floating-point arithmetic, instruction sets, RISC vs CISC, ALU design, bit slicing, microprogrammed control, microinstruction types, microprogram optimization, cache memories, interleaved memories, communication methods, bus control and timing, input-output, programmed I/O, interrupts and DMA, parallel and vector processors, pipelines, shared vs distributed memory, interconnection networks, and hypercube computers. Prerequisites: CPE 386  and CPE /ENGR 305 ; or permission of instructor.
  
  • CPE 433 - Microprocessor System Design and Lab

    (4 cr) This course is a basic introduction to microprocessor/microcontroller programming using the INTEL 80xxx series of microprocessor/microcontrollers. The course has a strong lab component where students will be exposed to programming the INTEL 80xxx series microprocessors in addition to learning their basic architecture. Topics include Assembly language programming, instruction time cycles, memory interfacing, input-output interfacing, data converters A/D and D/A, interrupts, general purpose programmable peripherals, etc. If time permits, students will be asked to do a lab project in which the microprocessor/microcontroller is used in a real-life application, e.g., a digital thermometer. Prerequisites: ENGR 305  and CPE 386 .
  
  • CPE 482 - Real Time and Embedded System Design

    (3 cr) A general introduction to real-time operating systems and embedded system design. Prerequisites: CPE 421 .
  
  • CPE 489 - Engineering Capstone Project I

    (1 cr) Students learn methods and skills for the engineering design process, demonstrate the ability to explore principles of engineering experimentation and design, identity real world projects in multidisciplinary engineering areas, and develop a practical plan to complete the projects (individual and/or group). Approved written project proposals and oral presentations are required at the end of the semester. The written proposal should include problem descriptions, objectives, selected approach, design alternatives, equipment requirements, time line as well as ethical, legal, and environmental issues. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

     

    CORE CODES :   WM     CP

  
  • CPE 490 - Engineering Capstone Project II

    (2 cr) Students develop and complete the proposed projects by utilizing the knowledge and experience gained from previous courses and by demonstrating the analyses and experiments. Students are required to present work in a professional manner which consists of three parts: comprehensive written reports including research and analysis, oral presentation, and operating working models.   Previously offered as 2 cr. Prerequisites: CPE 489 .

     :   WM   CP

  
  • CPE 492 - Cooperative Work Experience in Computer Science and Engineering

    (1-3 cr) A supervised work experience in which the student is employed in an approved professional position with an industry, firm, or government agency. A final written report and a presentation are required. May be repeated to a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisites: CIS 392 /CPE 392  with a pass grade and positive comments from both the faculty and on-site advisors; 3.0 GPA in the major; 2.3 GPA overall; and the recommendation of the student’s advisor.

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRIM 200 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    (3 cr) This course will provide an overview of the criminal justice system, its history, its philosophical development, and its contemporary configurations. Issues of law enforcement, adjudication, and corrections will be covered. Students will examine career opportunities and requirements in the criminal justice field and will become familiar with local, state, and national criminal justice systems.
  
  • CRIM 310 - Principles of Criminal Law

    (3 cr) This course explores the nature, origins, and general principles of criminal law. It examines pertinent aspects of federal and state criminal law, and concentrates on specific issues of interest to law enforcement including an examination of procedural law. Recent court decisions will be discussed and selected criminal offenses will be analyzed.
  
  • CRIM 311 - Criminal Justice Procedures

    (3 cr) Constitutional analysis of criminal procedure that focuses primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments; the right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure, the privilege against self-incrimination, and the right to counsel. The course examines the need to protect the public and enhance law enforcement efficiency and the need to protect individual defendants from abuse at the hands of the state.
  
  • CRIM 312 - Juvenile Delinquency

    (3cr) The course provides an understanding of the historical development of the concepts of delinquency and juvenile justice system; the volume and extent of delinquency; and the nature and processes of the juvenile system and corrections. The course will also explore various factors (biological, psychological, and sociological) associated with delinquency. These theories and an understanding of the aspects of delinquency and juvenile justice are imperative to the development of effective means of preventing young persons from starting the life of crime or graduating to adult criminal life. Previously offered as SOCI 312.
  
  • CRIM 315 - Criminal Investigation

    (3 cr) This course examines the fundamental principles of criminal investigation with concentration on the following areas—report writing; sources of information including witnesses, complainants, victims, observation, physical description, identification, interviews, interrogation, modus operandi, informants, surveillance, and undercover techniques; crime scene search, collection, preservation, and processing of physical evidence; and raids, arrests, search, seizure, and case preparation.
  
  • CRIM 320 - Criminal Court System

    (3 cr) This course will focus on the jurisdiction policies and procedures of criminal courts in the administration of justice. The role of the courts is pursued in determining social policy as it relates to criminology. Also, a complete survey of the criminal court system from local to state to federal jurisdiction will be taken.
  
  • CRIM 325 - Corrections

    (3 cr) This course provides a general overview of the American corrections system and a survey of today’s most pressing correctional problems.  The philosophy of punishment will be extensively discussed, and major emphases will be on the nature of the prison experience, alternatives to incarceration, judicial intervention into correctional affairs, and the controversy concerning the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs. Previously titled Penology.
  
  • CRIM 330 - The Juvenile Justice System

    (3cr) This course provides an in-depth examination of the philosophic, economic, political, and social factors leading to the establishment of the juvenile justice system in the United States.  Crime patterns of youth, police-juvenile relations, and correctional practices for juveniles are sample topics.  Previously titled Juvenile Justice Procedures.
  
  • CRIM 340 - Treatment and Rehabilitation

    (3cr) This course provides an in-depth examination of legal and social agencies aiding in the treatment of the offender, including the rise of specialty courts in the United States. A survey of treatment theories that influence and alter the attitudes, values, and behaviors of inmates and those recently released from correctional institutions are other topics. Previously titled Correction Procedure.
  
  • CRIM 350 - Transnational Organized Crime

    (3cr) This course examines current transnational crime issues and their effect on society. Transnational crime transcends all traditional geographic borders and operates as an international growth industry. The course focuses on some of the main pillars of transnational crime: human trafficking, drug smuggling and the tie to terrorism, money laundering, wildlife trafficking and weapons trafficking. The connection between these illegal activities and state corruption and terrorism will be examined, as well as the growing influence these illicit organizations are having on legitimate businesses and national economies. Finally, the course will explore what is being done globally to combat these issues. Prerequisites: SOCI 203 .
  
  • CRIM 360 - Ethical Practices

    (3cr) This course provides a broad understanding of ethical operations in the criminal justice system from a professional responsibility lens. The various philosophies of accountability, supervision, and organizational culture and their role in reducing unethical behavior will be discussed. The central objective of the course is to familiarize the student with the basics of ethical conduct within law enforcement as well as morality and the law. Prerequisites: SOCI 203 .
  
  • CRIM 402 - Advanced Criminological Theory

    (3 cr) Crime is a major social problem that increasingly continues not only to undermine and stifle individual liberties, but also is having a tremendous draining effect on the already burdened valuable resources of the American society. This course provides an understanding of the historical development and definition of the concepts of crime and the criminal justice system; the volume and extent of crime; and the nature and processes of the criminal justice system and correction. The course will also explore various factors (biological, psychological, and sociological) associated with crime. Previously offered as SOCI 402 Criminology.
  
  • CRIM 410 - Prosecution and Defense

    (3 cr) Behavioral and legal analysis of the stages and procedures of a criminal case including initial appearance, bail, preliminary hearing, grand jury, arraignment, suppression hearings, trial, and sentencing. Emphasis is on bail reform, plea bargaining, screening, diversion, speedy trial, insanity defense, discovery, and the role of the defense attorney, prosecutor, and judge. Included is an examination of the court system as a social institution of human actors who exercise extensive discretion within the boundaries of the law.
  
  • CRIM 415 - Gender and Crime

    (3cr) Gender and Crime explores the intersection between gender/women and crime. Such experiences are explored in an examination of gender constructionism, women’s historically disadvantaged status in a patriarchal society, and the multiple ways through which law, and the criminal justice system in particular, help maintain modern systems of patriarchy. We will discuss violence toward women alongside possible interventions and solutions to crime issues. The course provides an understanding of the nature and extent of women as offenders, as victims and as workers in the criminal justics system. The course will examine theories related to crime and victimization among adolescent females and women. We will review the historical and present-day experiences of women as professionals in policing, courts, law, and corrections.
  
  • CRIM 425 - Policing

    (3cr) This course provides an overview of the history of policing in the United States, the functions of the police in modern society, and how those functions have evolved and continue to evolve in light of political, economic, and technological developments.  An emphasis is placed on analysis of contemporary research as well as classical analyses of police behavior.  Previously titled Police and Community Relations.
  
  • CRIM 430 - Police Organization and Management

    (3 cr) This course provides a broad understanding of the various aspects of police organizations and management. The various philosophies of policing, police organizations and management, and the role of police officers are discussed from political, cultural, and historical perspectives. The central objective of the course is to familiarize the student with the various criminal investigations techniques and crime control strategies within the framework of the American legal system.
  
  • CRIM 440 - Probation and Parole

    (3 cr) This course examines the history, objectives, performance, and future of the full range of probation, parole, intermediate sanctions, and community corrections services viewed as integral parts of the formal criminal justice process. Research and policy developments, training and personnel issues, what works with different classes of offenders (including juveniles), the pre-sentence investigation/reporting system, sentencing and incarceration, recidivism rates, legal issues, public perceptions, and trends within the system are among the topics covered.
  
  • CRIM 450 - Capstone - Field Experience

    (3cr) This course is a planned program of field work and participant observation in a selected criminal justice agency or community-based organization. Students will work with the internship coordinator to select an appropriate agency for placement. Once placement is approved, an internship supervisor from the internship agency will be secured and field work activities will be assigned by the agency as deemed appropriate. Learners will participate in a supervised field experience enabling an integration of major theories into practice and the ability to master practical writing and oral presentation skills.  They will also demonstrate the capacity to utilize the fundamental concepts of the social sciences (e.g., culture, social structure, inequality, social roles, etc.). Learners are required to utilize an online “web enhanced companion” to submit their internship journals, site contracts, and other writing assignments. To demonstrate an ability to do organizational analysis of the work site, utilizing the analytical frameworks discussed in upper-division social science courses, learners are required to maintain a journal that documents the field work experience and write a final paper. Additionally, all students enrolled will complete a resume workshop to prepare for prospective employment. This course may not be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisites: SOCI 301  and  SOCI 322 ; junior or senior standing; permission of sociology faculty.

    CORE CODES :  CP


Data Analytics

  
  • DATA 118 - Data Analytics Introduction

    (3cr) This course introduces data analytics majors to concepts, methods and tools that they will explore in greater depth in later courses. Topics will include programming language concepts, reading and writing files, data file types, data structures, the linux operating environment, visualization, data cleansing, relevant mathematics and statistics, and sources of interesting data sets. The course will explore the historical context, current relevance, and future growth of data analytics.
 

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