Oct 06, 2022  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Historic Preservation/Public History

  
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    HPPH 315 - Introduction to Archives

    (3cr) This course will familiarize students with the history and definitions of archives; the fundamental principles and methods of the archival profession; and the vital roles archives play in society. The course will examine what is involved in establishing and administering an archive, as well as look at some of the current debates in the archival field. Finally, it will allow students to gain experience with various aspects of archiving, such as appraisal, processing, and creating finding aids.
  
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    HPPH 321 - Material Culture

    (3cr) This course explores how different peoples across time interact with physical objects and how these objects, in turn, have shaped diverse cultures. Students will interpret a variety of artifacts, including tools, toys, clothing, architecture and town design, interior furnishings, and methods of transportation. Topics include material culture interpretation as a methodological approach, and what physical artifacts reveal about individual lives, social structures, and national narratives.  Previously titled American Decorative Arts.
  
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    HPPH 325 - Oral History

    (3cr) This course provides an introduction to the theory and methodology of oral history interviewing and ethnography. Students will learn the process of working with informants, recordation of oral  history, transcription of interviews, and analysis of documentary material.
  
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    HPPH 328 - Battlefield Preservation

    (3cr) This course surveys the development of battlefield preservation in the United States from the formation of the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association in 1864 to recent efforts to expand the definition of threatened battlefields by the American Battlefield Protection program of the National Park Service. Sites from the French and Indian War to World War II will be featured with special focus on Civil War Battlefield Preservation efforts since the Civil War centennial.
  
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    HPPH 330 - Living History Interpretation

    (3cr) This course addresses the theory and practice of  living history, including researching and creating characters and their place in the historical environment, the creation and development of costumes, basic principles of acting, the history of living history and reenactment, the presentation of characters in regional, local, and state historical context, and the implications of gender race, ethnicity, and religion for living history interpretation.
  
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    HPPH 332 - Museum and Historical Site Interpretation

    (3cr) This course examines the theory and methods of museum and historic site interpretation. Students will explore the relationship between history and public audiences, and contemporary debates in museum and historic site practices. Students will visit historic sites and museums to explore current issues facing public history professionals in the twenty-first century.
  
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    HPPH 334 - National Parks Interpretation

    (3cr) An introduction to theories, methods, and issues in U. S. National Parks. This course focuses on interpretation, cultural and natural resource management, federal government policies, and heritage tourism. Students will visit local and regional National Parks and explore challenges facing parks in the twenty-first century.
  
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    HPPH 335 - New Media and Digital History

    (3 cr) This course examines the impact of new media and technology on the field of history. We discuss the theoretical implications of new media for historical research and writing, and explore how technology changes the way history is taught and presented to public audiences. Topics include the digitization of primary sources, benefits and drawbacks of historical information available via the internet, and digital tools used by historians. Students will gain practical experience in the construction and use of digital resources.
  
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    HPPH 336 - Historical Entrepreneurship

    (3cr) This course focuses on economic issues in historic preservation and public history. Students will explore fundraising, grant writing, consulting, heritage tourism, and other opportunities to financially support historical work. An emphasis will be placed on practical approaches and economic tools available for various historical fields.
  
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    HPPH 338 - HPPH International Perspective

    (3cr) This course explores how different countries, regions, and towns throughout the world approach the fields of historic preservation and public history. Students will examine the ways in which social, cultural, and political forces shape how publics engage in narrative building and collective memory. Emphasis will be placed on how historical sites and institutions create and are shaped by national and international narratives.
  
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    HPPH 371 - Documentation of Historic Properties

    (3cr) Students will learn the methodology for locating, researching, and field recording historic cultural resources. The course will cover photographing, describing, and assessing sites, buildings, and structures and then researching their history as well as mapping and producing site plans, floor plans, and elevations.  GIS systems will be introduced.
  
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    HPPH 372 - Preservation Technology

    (3cr) Students will learn the history of architectural technology as applied to the construction of old building structures. The course focuses on historic buildings and structures, materials and fabric used in the past, as well as approved modern replacement components and compatability with historic materials.
  
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    HPPH 410 - Seminar in HPPH

    (3cr) Focusing on issues in Historic Preservation and Public History, the subject matter of the course will vary with each offering.  An emphasis will be placed on discussion of theories and methods in historical work and also practical experience through work on historic preservation and public history projects. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    HPPH 450 - Internship

    (3 cr) A 400-hour internship with students placed within an historic preservation or other public history organization in which students can apply what they learned during the degree program to real-world circumstances. Although flexible arrangements can be formulated for placement, it is preferable that the experience be completed during the summer or a semester after completion of the junior year. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, and a C or better in HIST 250 .

Historic Preservation/Public History (Graduate)

  
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    HPPH 525 - Oral History

    (3) This course provides an introduction to the theory and methodology of oral history interviewing and ethnography. Students will learn the process of working with informants, recordation of oral history, transcription of interviews, and research and analysis of documentary materials.

History

  
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    HIST 100 - History of Civilization: Asian Traditions

    (3 cr) The course covers the histories of East, Southeast, and South Asia from the inception of civilizations to approximately 1700 AD. It focuses on both political and cultural development within these regions.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

     

  
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    HIST 101 - History of Civilization: Ancient Worlds

    (3cr) A survey of ancient world civilizations. Emphasis is placed on basic similarities and differences in government, religion, economics, society, culture, and intellectual development. Previously titled History of Civilization: the Ancient and Medieval Worlds.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

     

  
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    HIST 102 - History of Civilization: Change and Global Connections in the Early Modern World

    (3 cr) A survey of civilization between roughly 1200 and 1800. Topics may include the Mongol conquests, the rise of West African kingdoms, the expansion of Islam, the Renaissance and Reformation, the rise of the modern state, the European Age of Exploration, the conquest of the Americas, the slave trade, the scientific revolution, and the French Enlightenment.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HIST 103 - History of Civilization: the Modern World

    (3 cr) A survey of the French Revolution and its aftermath, of liberalism, nationalism, industrialization, materialism, and imperialism. The student will investigate 20th-century wars, international organizations, and global interactions in the post-colonial world.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HIST 110 - The Western Tradition to 1400

    (3 cr) This course surveys the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa from its origins to the close of the Middle Ages.  It explores the development of government, the role of religion in society and culture, the emergence of secularism in Greece and Rome, the birth of scientific inquiry, the rise of Christianity and Islam, and relations among the peoples of the ancient and medieval world.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HIST 120 - Medieval World Civilizations

    (3cr) This course in intended to introduce students to world civilizations in the medieval period, from approximately 400-1400 CE. We will focus on the major world civilizations of the era, and examine the political, social, economic, religious and cultural contributions of each. The aim will be to illustrate to students the emergence of global trends and connections in the era which influences the development of modern society. This highly diverse period of human development and interaction provides an excellent survey of the various models of political organization as well as religious, philosophical and social constructs that have contributed to the evolution of the modern world. 

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HIST 124 - The Atlantic World, 1450-1850

    (3 cr) This course surveys the Atlantic World from the beginnings of the European exploration and imperialism in the mid-1400s through the revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries that liberated nearly all of the western hemispher from imperial domination. It focuses on how four continents (Europe, Africa, and the Americas) engaged with one another in new ways that shaped the lives of millions of people.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HIST 128 - The Age of Revolution, 1750-1950

    (3 cr) This course surveys world political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual history from the Enlightenment to the beginning of the Cold War. It places special emphasis on the history of ideas and their political application, the social and economic changes spawned by the Industrial Revolution, the development of modern culture, the changing face of government, and the history of international relations.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HIST 130 - World History in the 20th Century

    (3cr) This course surveys the social, cultural, political and economic history of the world during the twentieth century. It examines Western imperialism and how it shaped global cultures, economies, and conflicts, and also its demise brought on by the independence movements of colonized peoples. We will explore the competing ideologies that fueled events during the twentieth century, including capitalism, socialism, fascism, totalitarianism, feminism, and democracy.

    Fulfills Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HIST 150 - First-Year Experience “Reel” History

    (1cr) In this course students will be introduced to the study of various historical eras and regions through the medium of film and will be asked to examine the relationship between film and history. Film provides a valuable means of representing, reconstructing, and interpreting the past and evaluation of the medium encourages critical thinking and information literacy. Team-taught by all members of the History department faculty, this course introduces history majors to their field of study as well as to their faculty and advisors. Attention will be given to orienting students to campus life in general.

    CORE CODES :   FY

  
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    HIST 175 - WWI Travel Practicum

    (3 cr) The practicum provides on-site study of the European battlefield and other historic sites of World War I. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HIST 375  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HIST 201 - History of the United States to 1865

    (3 cr) Survey course examines the basic political, economic, and social forces in the formation and development of the American nation from the Colonial Period through the Civil War.

     :   HM   CK

  
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    HIST 202 - History of the United States, 1865 to Present

    (3 cr) Course surveys the basic political, economic, and social forces in the rise of the republic from sectional conflict to a major international role. Moving from Reconstruction to the recent decade, it covers the evolution of the nation from an agrarian to an industrial society.

     :  HM   CK

  
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    HIST 203 - United States and the World

    (3cr) This is a survey of American History from the 1600s to the recent past that emphasizes how the history of the people living in central North America interacted with people throughout the world. Putting American history in a global context includes looking at “domestic” events (such as the American Revolution, Reconstruction, Indian Removal, or “the Sixties”) anew, reexamining larger forces as influencing our history (such as the industrial revolution, European imperialism, the Enlightenment), as well as America’s direct interactions with other people across the globe (such as the World Wars, immigration policy, economic globalization, 9/11).  This view of American history from a global context will help students understand how their history fits in with others across the world.

    CORE CODES :   HM   CK   GL

  
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    HIST 250 - Introduction to Historical Studies

    (3 cr) An introduction to historiography and to historical methodology. This is a writing-intensive course designed to prepare students to write cogent, appropriately documented papers in the major. Prerequisites: Restricted to students majoring in history.

     :  WM

     

  
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    HIST 300 - Historic Preservation and Interpretation

    (3 cr) This course will familiarize students with the historic preservation policies and procedures of local, state, and national governments, as well as significant private efforts in the field. Students will learn the general principles and methods of interpretation of historic places. The course will draw extensively on local historical resources for examples of preservation efforts and interpretive practice.
  
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    HIST 301 - American Colonial History

    (3 cr) This course examines the development of colonies in America, 1492-1763. Instead of seeing the history of the mainland North American colonies as the rise of the United States, the course places the colonies in an Atlantic context. This multi-imperial, multi-ethnic, multicultural approach will focus on political, cultural, social, and economic interactions among Indians, African, and Europeans in the New World.
  
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    HIST 302 - Era of the American Revolution , 1763-1815

    (3 cr) An intensive study of the 1763-1815 period, this course focuses on the causes, nature, and consequences of the American Revolution and the formation of the United States through the War of 1812. It examines how all peoples living in the mainland colonies affected the creation and security of the new nation and how that new regime in turn shaped their lives.
  
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    HIST 303 - The Jacksonian Era , 1816-1850

    (3 cr) Covering the period from the Era of Good Feelings to the aftermath of the Mexican War, this course encompasses the rise of early nationalism, territorial expansion, the westward movement, the development of the market economy, the rise of the common man, and the manifestation of reform. This complex era, epitomized by Andrew Jackson’s career, saw the rise of disparate economic systems and political goals among the nation’s geographical sections.
  
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    HIST 304 - American Civil War and Reconstruction Era

    (3cr) The course examines the causes and course of the US Civil War, the relationship between war and society, as well as the impact of the war upon the modern United States in the areas of race, constitutional development, national and state politics, and economy. Previously titled The American Civil War, 1850-1865.
  
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    HIST 305 - History of the Lower Shenandoah Valley

    (3 cr) This regional course investigates historical development within the national context. It examines geographical features; early explorations and settlement; the colonial influences in migration, politics, and economy; antebellum matters such as slavery, transportation, and cultural manifestations; the American Civil War; Reconstruction, the farmer’s revolt, and industrialization; the limestone and orchard industry; and the 20th-century impact. Some attention is devoted to regional literature as it reflects historical character and biography of major personalities.
  
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    HIST 308 - The Old South

    (3 cr) This course examines the development of the American South from the Colonial period to 1850 as a distinctive section. It traces the origins of the plantation system; the rise of democracy, slavery, and the common man; the westward movement; and the Southern position on national political issues. It also appraises societal, intellectual, and political conflicts within the section.
  
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    HIST 309 - West Virginia and the Appalachian Region

    (3 cr) This course explores the development of the Appalachian region with an emphasis on the history of western Virginia and the state of West Virginia. It will place the region within its national and global contexts and will examine the geographical, political, economic, and cultural aspects of the area’s history. Specific topics covered in the course include early European settlement, sectional conflict and the West Virginia statehood movement, cultural diversity, and the development of the extraction economy. Throughout the semester students will analyze the impact of national events on the mountain south and will develop an understanding of the current problems facing the region through a detailed study of its past.
  
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    HIST 310 - Rise of Industrial Democracy

    (3 cr) Course will encompass the domestic development of modern America from the end of Reconstruction to the beginning of the Great Depression. It covers urbanization, immigration to the United States, the development of mass culture, Progressivism, and the challenges faced by Americans within the context of the rise of industrial capitalism.  Previously titled The Gilded Age and Progressive Era.
  
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    HIST 312 - New Deal to Great Society

    (3 cr) This course examines United States history from 1932 to 1972, an era dominated by liberalism and the New Deal coalition. It explores attempts by the government and different groups within American society to reform politics and economic system to meet the challenges of a large and diverse population. It covers America’s international involvement against the backdrop of World War II and the Cold War. Domestic concerns include the expansion of the welfare state, McCarthyism, the civil rights movement, modern feminist movement, and student activism.  Previously titled American Society in an Era of Crises, 1917-1945.
  
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    HIST 314 - Recent United States History since 1972

    (3 cr) This course examines United States history since 1972, an era in which conservatism and the Republican Party have dominated the political system. Topics include the Cold War and its end, Watergate, the feminist movement, the Reagan Revolution, and adjusting to a post-industrial economy. Emphasis will also be placed on American social and cultural changes that reflect and also challenge that conservative dominance. American’s domestic events will be explored against the backdrop of our role in international politics and society.  Previously titled Recent United States History, 1945 to Present.
  
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    HIST 315 - United States Women to 1869

    (3 cr) The study of women in America from the 1600s to the rejection of women’s suffrage in 1869. This course analyzes the diverse experience of women from different ethnic, racial, socioeconomic, and regional backgrounds. Emphasis is placed on women’s attempts to maximize their opportunities in an age of political, economic, and social transformations.  Previously titled History of American Women; replaced by a 2-semester sequence.

    CORE CODES :   HM   MD

  
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    HIST 316 - United States Women since 1869

    (3cr) This course examines U.S. history since 1869 by focusing on women’s experiences and perspectives. We look at women’s paid and unpaid labor, their participation in the political system, feminist and other political activism, changing understandings of gender roles, and popular perceptions of women’s place in American society. Throughout the course we will ask what difference it makes to place women at the center of historical inquiry, and by looking at primary documents and historians’ interpretations we will uncover the narratives that emerge when we consider women as historical actors. The impact of class, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation on women’s lives will be emphasized throughout the course.

    CORE CODES :  HM   MD

  
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    HIST 318 - United States and World War II

    (3 cr) Covers the event leading to the war, the major campaign, and the effects of the war on the home front. Major emphasis is upon military strategy and the campaigns.
  
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    HIST 320 - Sub-Saharan Africa

    (3 cr) An interdisciplinary examination of Sub-Saharan Africa, including the great migrations, the genesis of modern Africa in the nineteenth century, the impact of imperialism, and the rise and consequences of nationalism.
  
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    HIST 322 - Environmental History

    (3 cr) See ENVS 322 .
  
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    HIST 327 - Europe 400-1000

    (3cr) This course explores the historical development of Europe from the collapse of the Roman Empire through the foundation of Christian Europe and the origins of the modern state. Topics include the conversion of Europe to Christianity, the rise of the Church in politics and society, the synthesis of ethnic, religious and cultural identities, and the feudal transformation of medieval society.
  
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    HIST 328 - Europe 1000-1450

    (3cr) This course surveys the political, social, economic and cultural developments of Europe in the high and late medieval period.  Emphasis is placed on topics such as the rise of the nation state, conflict between Europe and the Islamic world, the Commercial Revolution and urban revival, the rise of the modern state, and cultural expressions of the era from Gothic to Renaissance.
  
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    HIST 329 - The Renaissance and Reformation

    (3 cr) A study of Renaissance politics, literary and intellectual contributions, and the conditions of social and religious unrest which led to the successes and failures of the Reformation.
  
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    HIST 331 - Ancient Civilization

    (3 cr) The process by which civilizations develop and the application of this process to the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean with special emphasis on the Hebrew and the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, Senior, nondegree status, or permission of instructor.
  
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    HIST 333 - Modern European History

    (3 cr) The political, economic, and intellectual achievements and failures of Europe from the time of the French Revolution to the coming of World War I, including the impact of European contact with the non-European world. Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, Senior, nondegree status, or permission of instructor.
  
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    HIST 334 - Twentieth-Century Europe

    (3cr) This course surveys European history from 1914 to the present. Topics will include World War I, the interwar period, World War II, Cold War Europe, European integration and the European Union, and the challenges of the twenty-first century.
  
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    HIST 338 - European Women to 1500

    (3 cr) The course is an introduction to the history of women from Antiquity through the Renaissance. It explores the role of gender in historical experience and evaluates that experience for women. The course will also examine women’s participation and status in the political and economic realm and their role in the private sphere.
  
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    HIST 339 - European Women Since 1500

    (3 cr) An examination of issues in the political, intellectual, social, and economic history of European women since the Reformation.
  
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    HIST 340 - Modern Asian History Through Literature

    (3cr) This course introduces students to the histories of East and South Asia from approximately 1870 to the present, focusing on the challenges that Asian nations have faced in adapting to the modern world while pursuing their own objectives within it. Using novels and novellas as its subject matter, the course explores the human dimension of the massive changes that Asian nations have undergone in modern times. Works studied in the course illustrate both the substantial differences among nations and regions and our shared humanity.

     

    CORE CODES :   HM   GL

  
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    HIST 342 - Twentieth Century Germany

    (3cr) Examines the course of German history from the Kaiserreich to German reunification and beyond. It follows German involvement in World War I, the chaotic but culturally rich Weimar Republic, the rise of the Nazis, World War II and the Holocaust, post-war occupation and division, reunification, and Germany’s place in the 21st century world.
  
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    HIST 345 - Introduction to Public History

    (3 cr) This course examines how academic history reaches wider audiences and the way in which history and memory shape culture, politics, and collective identity. The course, which includes field trips to historic sites, also introduces students to potential sources of employment for historians in non-academic settings.
  
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    HIST 351 - African American History to 1865

    (3cr) This course focuses on the lived experience of African Americans from the earliest emigrants through the legal end of slavery in 1865. It is not a course on slavery or the South; instead, it emphasizes the efforts of African Americans throughout what would become the United States to adapt, translate, modify, or create social relationships, cultural identities, economic conditions, and political standing in a world defined by an increasingly entrenched institution of slavery and changing notions of racial difference. It is a course about agency, resistance, accommodation, negotiation, freedom, suffering, and survival.

    CORE CODES :   HM   MD

  
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    HIST 352 - African American History since 1865

    (3cr) This course introduces students to the experiences of African Americans since the end of the Civil War. We begin with how the black community was shaped by and responded to the end of slavery, including the limitations of Reconstruction. Other topics include migrations out of the South, how American industrialization and economic changes shaped black economic opportunities, black protest movements, black intellectual traditions, African Americans in popular culture, and how the word wars changed race relations in American society.

    CORE CODES :   HM   MD

  
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    HIST 360 - Evolution of European Government

    (3 cr) An experiential study abroad course tracing the evolution of European political philosophy, governmental institutions, society, and culture from the ancient Greeks through the Roman Empire, the Medieval and Renaissance states to the European Union. The course will include visits to major European cities where students will visit historic and cultural sites, attend lectures, and meet with representatives for European governments.
  
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    HIST 375 - First World War

    (3 cr) A study of the causes, conduct, and impact of the First World War. The course examines the war from global military, diplomatic, social, economic, and cultural perspectives.
  
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    HIST 378 - American Military History

    (3 cr) This course, which covers the period from the founding of Jamestown in 1607 through the 21st century War on Terror, examines the development of American military policy, the efforts of armed forces in carrying out that policy, and the effects of U.S. military policy on international relations and internal development. Prerequisite/corequisite: Sophomore, Junior, Senior, nondegree status, or permission of instructor.
  
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    HIST 404 - The Contemporary World Since 1929

    (3 cr) Concerns political and intellectual events since the Great Depression and their impact on the contemporary scene.
  
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    HIST 407 - History of England to 1603

    (3 cr) A survey of British civilization from the Roman Conquest through the Tudor Age with emphasis on political, economic, social, and cultural developments.
  
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    HIST 408 - History of England Since 1603

    (3 cr) A survey of British civilization from the Stuarts to the present, continuing the political economic, social, and cultural developments. Emphasis will be placed on Britain’s emerging role in world affairs.
  
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    HIST 409 - History and Memory

    (3 cr) This course explores the ways that historians, nations, families and individuals capture, exploit, and know the past. It focuses on a wide range of questions relating to the formation of historical consciousness and collective memory, including official representation in public monuments and commemorations, personal narratives, popular culture, and the various forms of media. Prerequisites: HIST 201  or HIST 202 .
  
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    HIST 410 - Russia to 1855

    (3 cr) A survey of medieval and early imperial Russia with special emphasis on political, social, economic, and cultural developments.
  
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    HIST 412 - History of Russia Since 1855

    (3 cr) A survey of late imperial and Soviet Russian history with special emphasis on political, social, economic, and cultural developments.
  
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    HIST 416 - Italian City States

    (3 cr) This course examines the evolution of the city states of northern and central Italy from the 9th to the 16th centuries. It explores how this region experienced various forms of republican government, produced merchant empires, created an influential artistic movement, and dominated European politics for centuries.
  
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    HIST 419 - East Asia to 1800

    (3 cr) This course examines the histories of China, Japan, and Korea, from their beginnings to the commencement of their intensive contact with Western nations. The course will balance the historical primacy of China in the region with the political and cultural independence of neighboring states.
  
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    HIST 420 - Modern East Asia Since 1800

    (3 cr) The response of China, Japan, and Korea to the challenge of the West during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  
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    HIST 421 - History of Modern Japan

    (3 cr) The course will familiarize students with the main events and trends of early modern (1600-1867) and modern (1868-present) Japanese history. Emphasis will be placed on the political, social, and intellectual dimensions of Japan’s experience of modernity.
  
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    HIST 425 - Seminar in United States History

    (3 cr) Focusing on United States history, the subject matter of the course will vary with each offering.  Previously titled Readings in American and Western Hemispheric History. HIST 425 may be repeated for credit when the course content is changed, to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    HIST 426 - Seminar in World History

    (3cr) Focusing on World and comparative history, the subject matter of the course will vary with each offering. Previously, titled Readings in American and Western Hemispheric History. HIST 426 is repeatable when course content is changed, to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    HIST 427 - Seminar in European History

    (3 cr) Focusing on European history, the subject matter of the course will vary with each offering.  Previously titled Readings in European and World History. HIST 427 may be repeated for credit when the course content is changed, to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    HIST 428 - Seminar in Asian History

    (3cr) Focusing on Asian history, the subject matter of the course will vary with each offering.  Previously titled Readings in European and World History. HIST 428 may be repeated for credit when the course content is changed, to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    HIST 430 - Civil War Seminar

    (3 cr) A special topics seminar which will investigate some aspect of the Civil War, e.g., Europe and the American Civil War, Abolitionism. The topic will vary from year to year. Each student, in consultation with the seminar director, will write a research paper related to the topic.
  
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    HIST 432 - Public History Internship

    (3 cr) This course offers practical learning experience at a historic site, museum, archive, government agency, or similar setting. Students will work at least 40 hours at tasks assigned by the cooperating site supervisor and the course instructor. A research paper related to the site will be written by the student in consultation with the instructor.
  
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    HIST 435 - Practicum in Civil War Studies

    (3 cr) This course provides both practical learning experience in a Civil War or 19th-century related park, museum, library, or similar setting and classroom discussion of how academic historians and public historians interpret the past. Possible sites may include the national parks at Antietam and Harpers Ferry or the National Museum of Civil War Medicine. Students will work at least 80 hours in tasks assigned by the cooperating site supervisor and the instructor and, in conjunction with the instructor and the site supervisor, will produce a research paper related to some aspect of the site.
  
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    HIST 440 - Ideas in the Modern West

    (3 cr) The course will familiarize students with major thinkers and intellectual movements in the Western world from approximately 1750 to the later 20th century. It will treat the French Enlightenment as the impetus for a variety of conflicting efforts to understand human nature, society, and the cosmos.
  
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    HIST 445 - Latin America to 1840

    (3 cr) This course examines the political and social formation of Latin America to 1840, including the pre-Columbian era, colonial society, and independence movements. Themes examined will include relations between the individual and the state, and issue of gender, race, and religion. Students will work extensively with primary documents.
  
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    HIST 446 - Latin America Since 1820

    (3 cr) This course examines modern Latin America from the formation of independent states around 1820 through the present day. Themes emphasized include political and economic structures, relations with the United States, human rights, and the impact globalization.
  
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    HIST 495 - Capstone Seminar in History

    (3 cr) The seminar is the culminating academic experience for history majors. Students will develop and apply their knowledge of historical methodology and historiography in the production of a major research project. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the History major; C or better in HIST 250 .

     :  CP


History (Graduate)

  
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    HIST 500 - Historic Preservation

    (3cr) Course will familiarize the student with the historic preservation policies and procedures of local, state, and national governments, and of the outstanding private efforts in the field. A study and research of the general principles and methods of interpretation of historic phenomena to the general public will be involved. Extensive out-of-classroom use will be made of the historical resources in the local area for interpretive practice and preservation examples.
  
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    HIST 504 - American Civil War and Reconstruction Era

    (3cr) The course examines the causes and course of the US Civil War, the relationship between war and society, as well as the impact of the war upon the modern United States in the areas of race, constitutional development, national and state politics, and economy.
  
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    HIST 505 - History of the Lower Shenandoah Valley

    (3cr) This regional course investigates historical development within the national context. It examines geographical features; early explorations and settlement; the colonial influences in migration, politics, and economy; antebellum matters such as slavery, transportation, and cultural manifestations; the American Civil War; Reconstruction, the farmer’s revolt, and industrialization; the limestone and orchard industry; and the 20th-century impact. Some attention is devoted to regional literature as it reflects historical character and biography of major personalities.
  
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    HIST 509 - West Virginia and the Appalachian Region

    (3cr) Emphasis upon the development of western Virginia and the state of West Virginia. This course will examine the general geographical, political, and economic aspects of the southern Appalachian region. The impact upon the Mountain State of the patterns of settlement, the heritage of sectional conflict, the statehood movement, legal and political developments accompanying the assimilation of the area into the national economy, and national events will be considered. The student will research and view the current problems of the area and contemporary Appalachian society.
  
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    HIST 520 - American Colonial History

    (3 cr) This course examines the development of colonies in America, 1492-1763. Instead of seeing the history of the mainland North American colonies as the rise of the United States, this course places the Colonies in an Atlantic context. The multi-imperial, multi-ethnic, multi-cultural approach will focus on the political, cultural, social, and economic interactions between Indians, Africans, and Europeans throughout the New World. Students will undertake an intensive course of readings on historians’ interpretations of the major political, social, and economic issues of the Colonial period.
  
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    HIST 521 - American Revolutionary Era

    (3 cr) An intensive study of the years 1763-1815, this course focuses on the causes, nature, and consequences of the American Revolution and the formation of the United States through the War of 1812. This class does not assume the inevitability of the United States. Instead, it examines how all peoples living in the mainland colonies affected the creation and security of that new nation, and how that new regime in turn shaped their lives. Students will undertake an intensive course of readings on historians’ interpretations of the major political, social, and economic issues of the Revolutionary era.
  
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    HIST 572 - American Society in an Era of Crisis, 1917-1945

    (3 cr) This course focuses on The United States during one of its most critical periods, from World War I through World War II. Focuses on the social, economic, and political aspects of America’s participation in World War I; the decade of the Roaring Twenties with its attendant prosperity and social stresses; the Great Depression; and the impact of the New Deal and World War II.
  
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    HIST 573 - History of Women in Europe

    (3 cr) This course examines selected issues in the political, intellectual, social, and economic history of women in Europe from the Middle Ages through the Second World War. It devotes special attention to the study of historiography and the social construction of gender.
  
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    HIST 574 - The History of Modern East Asia

    (3 cr) This course examines how the countries of East Asia responded to the twin challenges of modernization and Western encroachment during the 19th and 20th centuries. While concentrating on political developments, it also addresses issues in cultural and social history.
  
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    HIST 599 - Special Topics: History

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of history.
  
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    HIST 699 - Special Topics: History

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of history.

Honors

  
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    HNRS 101 - Honors First-Year Course

    (6 cr) The Honors learning community introduces first-year Honors students to major types of expository and critical writing in conjunction with the study of Western civilization. Topics focus on philosophical thought throughout history, with emphasis on changes in government, economics, arts, science, and literature.
  
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    HNRS 102 - Honors History of Civilization

    (3cr) This half of the Honors First Year Core learning community introduces first year Honors students to the study of world civilizations in conjunction with a survey of world literature and culture from the same period. Topics focus on philosophical thought throughout history, with emphasis on changes in government, economics, arts, science, and literature.  Previously titled Honors First Year History.

    Satisfies the Core Curriculum Tier One History requirement.

  
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    HNRS 205 - Honors Literature and Culture

    (3cr) This half of the Honors First year Core learning community introduces first year Honors students to survey of world literature in conjunction with the study of world civilizations of the same period, including both Western and nonwestern works.  Previously HNRS 105-Honors First Year English.

     :   HM   GL

  
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    HNRS 388 - Honors Project Preparation

    (1 cr) This course prepares Honors candidates to undertake the work of the Honors Capstone Project, the final requirement for graduation from the Honors Program. Topics include an overview of the research process, the differences between theses and non-thesis projects, developing appropriate research questions, identifying an appropriate faculty mentor, techniques for overcoming common stumbling blocks in conducting research, and information on the expectations of the Honors Directed Readings and Honors Capstone Project courses. This course will culminate in the production of a final research proposal and plan that will be submitted for approval to the Honors Advisory Board. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    HNRS 389 - Honors Seminar

    (3 cr) An advanced seminar for Honors students. Subject matter and content vary from semester to semester, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary explorations of provocative and timely topics. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    HNRS 399 - Special Topics

    (1-3 cr) Varies.
 

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