Nov 30, 2022  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Social Work

  
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    SOWK 311 - Social Work Methods I

    (3 cr) An introduction to the basic interviewing techniques and skills utilized in social work practice. The mechanics of conducting interviews, gathering information, and making assessments as well as recording interviews will be covered. Techniques used in one-to-one interviews, cross-cultural interviews, social assessments, and termination are discussed. Roles of the social worker in staging interventions on the micro level in the context of responsibility for macro level charge are stressed. Prerequisites: SOWK 201  and SOWK 300 .
  
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    SOWK 312 - Social Work Methods II

    (3 cr) This course utilizes critical thinking from an empowerment perspective to engage in problem solving in mezzo generalist practice. A central focus of the course will be on developing generalist skills that help prepare clients in groups and families to effectively cope with future problems. Generalist practitioners are those who have attained an integrated understanding of social work knowledge, skills, and values which enable graduates to select and use appropriate methods of intervention on all levels in the delivery of human services. The selection and utilization of appropriate theories, strategies, and techniques with client systems is stressed. Prerequisites: SOWK 311 ; majors only.
  
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    SOWK 313 - Social Work Methods III

    (3 cr) This course is designed to be an introduction to the topic of administration and supervision in the human services. The purpose of the course is to give B.S.W.-level practitioners a knowledge and skill base for beginning administrative and supervisory practice. The content of the course will include an exploration of formal organizations, management styles and theories, issues in supervision, interpersonal and organizational communication, program planning, and evaluation as a function of social planning. The format of the course is designed to combine formal lecture presentations with experimental exercises, simulations, and films in an effort to explore the materials from a variety of perspectives. Prerequisites: SOWK 311  and 312 ; majors only.
  
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    SOWK 320 - Child Welfare Services

    (3 cr) An introduction to the areas of child welfare problems, needs, and services in America. The historical development of child welfare services is surveyed as well as dealing with major current issues. Course content includes public and private agencies and specialized services in the categories of dependent and neglected children, family-centered services, physically and mentally handicapped children, adoptions, foster care, and institutional services. Prerequisites: SOCI 203  and PSYC 101 .
  
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    SOWK 325 - Orientation to Field Practicum

    (1 cr) This seminar for junior level students meets once a week to prepare students for field experience and to facilitate the application and interview process needed to secure a field placement. Students must complete a portfolio, a series of interviews and a proposal for a learning contract. Topics to be covered include 1) professional boundaries and liabilities, 2) diverse client populations, 3) practice settings, 4) legal, ethical, and practical concerns in the field experience practicum. Prerequisites: SOWK 301 , 305 , 311 ; majors only.
  
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    SOWK 330 - International Community Service Learning

    (3cr) This study abroad program is designed to familiarize students with social issues and the provision of social services in Central America (e.g., Guatemala, Nicaragua) and the role of social work and social policy within the context of each country. Students will gain an understanding of the history, language, customs and culture in the designated country. They will be challenged to analyze the various ideologies of oppression (i.e., sexism, racism, etc.) within the social structure as compared to that of the U.S.

    As part of the course experience, participants will complete a building project for families connected with an established NGO. Participants will also partner with professionally educated social workers to complete home visits. Students will have the opportunity to visit other social service and advocacy organizations. Students will participate in language study in the afternoons and experience immersion through home stays with local families. The program is an intense small group experience in living, learning, traveling, and studying. Prerequisites: SOCI 203 .

  
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    SOWK 350 - Professional Self-Care

    (1cr) This one-credit online course is designed to support those in the helping professions with their caregiving responsibilities for others. It also has implications for personal as well as professional caregiving responsiblities. It explores and promotes resources and techniques for self-care in order to successfully sustain care for others. It is intended to provide help and healing to combat burnout, vicarious tramatization, and compassion fatigue. It addresses a wide range of strategies and examines the barriers to implementing these approaches on a structured ongoing basis. The material has application for creating and maintaining personal professional relationships which are healthy, effective, and ethical.
  
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    SOWK 402 - Social Gerontology

    (3 cr) An interdisciplinary consideration of the sociological, psychological, and biological processes of aging with emphasis on modes of social intervention. Important aspects of the demography of the aged are clarified, as is the aging’s relationship with the family. Studies in changes in intelligence, memory, brain function, and behavior accompany a look at the physiological aspects of the psychology of aging. Normal and pathological physical changes and the effects of exercise receive attention. Discussions of environmental and social issues such as prolongation of life, institutionalization, economics, neighborhood planning, public policy, and community services are examined in their particular applications to older persons and the aging processes. Strategies and techniques of the development and delivery of social services are presented. Prerequisites: SOCI 203  and PSYC 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOWK 404 - Social Work Capstone

    (3 cr) Gives the advanced undergraduate student an opportunity to explore further and integrate, in a generic way, knowledge learned in individual courses covering many other areas of content. There is in-depth analysis of social work values and ethics, professionalism, social change, and systems of delivering human welfare services. Prerequisites: Senior majors only.

     

    CORE CODES:   CP

  
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    SOWK 407 - Field Experience in Social Work I

    (3 cr) The culmination of the social welfare student’s course work in which the student will be expected to transform theory into practice through direct delivery of human welfare services in an approved community agency under the direction of a qualified supervisor. The student works in an agency 20 hours per week and attends a two-hour seminar held weekly on the University campus. The University faculty and the agency supervise work closely to insure the student undergoes an intense, thorough, broad experience in direct service to people in need. Prerequisites: senior majors only. Note: All students required to complete field work must fill out a field work application form in duplicate during the semester preceding the proposed field work. Forms can be obtained from the field instruction coordinator.
  
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    SOWK 408 - Field Experience in Social Work II

    (3 cr) Continuation of Field Experience in Social Work I. Note: All students required to complete field work must fill out a field work application form in duplicate during the semester preceding the proposed field work. Forms can be obtained from the chair of the Social Work Department. Prerequisites: senior majors only.
  
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    SOWK 409 - Field Experience Seminar I

    (2 cr) Weekly seminar which aids the student in meeting the objectives of the field experience program and in applying, in an integrated manner, the theoretical concepts and principles learned in the classroom to the actual delivery of social services. Through use of the case presentation format, the student will be exposed to a variety of change agent, client, target, and action systems and will further develop the ability to analyze and evaluate differing interventive approaches and techniques. The seminar will also expand the student’s knowledge of and experience with group problem-solving and professional relationships. Prerequisites: senior majors only.
  
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    SOWK 410 - Field Experience Seminar II

    (2 cr) Weekly seminar which aids the student in meeting the objectives of the field experience program and in applying, in an integrated manner, the theoretical concepts and principles learned in the classroom to the actual delivery of the social services. Through use of the case presentation format, the student will be exposed to a variety of change agent, client, target, and action systems and will further develop the ability to analyze and evaluate differing interventive approaches and techniques. The seminar will also expand the student’s knowledge of and experience with group problem-solving and professional relationships. Prerequisites: senior majors only.
  
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    SOWK 411 - Field Experience in Social Work III

    (3 cr) The culmination of the social welfare student’s course work in which the student will be expected to transform theory into practice through direct delivery of human welfare services in an approved community agency under the direction of a qualified supervisor. The student works in an agency 20 hours per week and attends a two-hour seminar held weekly on the University campus. The University faculty and the agency supervisor work closely to insure the student undergoes an intense, thorough, broad experience in direct service to people in need. Prerequisites: senior majors only.
  
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    SOWK 412 - Field Experience IV

    (3 cr) The final semester of the social work students’s field instruction in which the student will be expected to continue applying theory to practice through direct delivery of human services in an approved community agency under the direction of a qualified supervisor. The student works in an agency 20 hours per week and attends a two-hour seminar held weekly on the Shepherd campus. The University faculty and the agency supervisor work closely to insure the student undergoes an intense, thorough, broad experience in direct service to people in need. Prerequisites: senior majors only.
  
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    SOWK 415 - Readings in Social Work

    (3 cr each) Selected, in-depth analysis of specialized areas of social welfare. The class is structured around intensive reading in a concentrated area with follow-up discussion groups. Each student prepares a research paper exploring some aspect of the topic under study. Content areas include historical analysis, policy formulation, practice theory, comparative policy and theory, and research theory and methodology. Prerequisites: junior/senior status.
  
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    SOWK 416 - Readings in Social Work

    (3 cr each) Selected, in-depth analysis of specialized areas of social welfare. The class is structured around intensive reading in a concentrated area with follow-up discussion groups. Each student prepares a research paper exploring some aspect of the topic under study. Content areas include historical analysis, policy formulation, practice theory, comparative policy and theory, and research theory and methodology. Prerequisites: junior/senior status.
  
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    SOWK 417 - Sex and Gender in Contemporary Society

    (3 cr) This course explores changing roles for women and men in contemporary society. Rapid social change creates crisis and opportunity for individuals and society. Women and men are presently undergoing transitions in the social psychological, economic, and political spheres of their lives. Students critically analyze some of the current changes in gender roles. Lecture material is integrated with experiential material in the form of classroom activities. It is assumed that students have a basic knowledge of core concepts in sociology and social work. Prerequisites: SOCI 203  or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOWK 423 - Research for Social Work

    (3cr) This course is designed to introduce social work students to research methods for evidence-based social work practice and data-informed decision making. Quantitative and qualitative research methods, data collection, and data analysis are presented. Special attention is given to research methods used to evaluate social work practice at the individual, family, group, organization, and community levels. Additionally, students will examine the relationship between ethical research practices and the core values of the social work profession. Prerequisites: BADM 224  or MATH 314  or PSYC 250 ; SOWK 325 ; and Senior standing.

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

    (3 cr) A basic, culturally-oriented course in conversational Spanish designed for beginning students who wish to develop skills in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending Spanish. Emphasis is placed on oral communication through dialogue and guided compositions. Audio and video tapes of Spain and Mexico are extensively used.  Effective Fall 2014, no longer fulfills Core Curriculum Tier Two Humanities.
  
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    SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

    (3 cr) A continuation of SPAN 101 , this course allows students to strengthen their comprehension and speaking proficiency in Spanish by providing extensive practice in oral and written communication and self-expression and thorough discussions and oral presentations of readings in the culture of Spain, Mexico, Central America, and South America.  Effective Fall 2014, no longer fulfills Core Curriculum Tier Two Humanities. Prerequisites: SPAN 101 .
  
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    SPAN 110 - Practicum in Spanish

    (3cr) A course designed in alliance with the Washington Semester program or co-op program to allow University credit for practical experience in the Washington/Baltimore areas. Open to freshmen only. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    SPAN 111 - Study Abroad

    (3cr) Shepherd University will offer a series of study abroad opportunities during the summer. The department has scheduled trips to Argentina and Peru, and future offerings will likely include other Spanish-speaking countries. Students will produce a paper upon their return in order to get credit for this course. Open to freshmen only.
  
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    SPAN 203 - Intermediate Spanish I

    (3 cr) A review of the basic structures and phonetics of the Spanish language studied through readings and discussions of the culture and literature of Spain and other countries in Central and South America, and enhanced through further oral communication practices, brief compositions, and oral reports. Prerequisites: SPAN 101  and SPAN 102 .

     :   HM   GL

  
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    SPAN 204 - Intermediate Spanish II

    (3 cr) A continuation of SPAN 203 , this course is designed for more advanced students and allows them to strengthen their proficiency in Spanish through advanced structural and oral exercises and several different kinds of writing assignments. Prerequisites: SPAN 101 , SPAN 102 , and SPAN 203 .

     :   HM   GL

  
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    SPAN 301 - Advanced Conversation and Composition I

    (3 cr) A course designed to help students sharpen their oral and writing skills through the use of guided conversation and composition. Topics for discussion include the family and cultural differences. Prerequisites: SPAN 204  or permission of the instructor.

     

  
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    SPAN 302 - Advanced Conversation and Composition II

    (3 cr) A continuation of SPAN 301 , this course is designed to help students continue to sharpen their oral and writing skills through the use of guided conversation and composition. Topics for discussion include the family and cultural differences. Prerequisites: SPAN 204  or permission of the instructor.

     :   WM

  
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    SPAN 303 - The Contemporary Hispanic World

    (3 cr) Based on current documentation (literature and film) of contemporary society in Spain and Latin America, the course strives to give students an understanding of these cultures from a political, historical, social, and literary perspective. Prerequisites: SPAN 204  or permission.
  
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    SPAN 304 - Introduction to Spanish and Latin American Literature

    (3 cr) An introduction to textual analysis, the course comprises prose, poetry, and drama. The texts are studied using current critical techniques. Prerequisites: SPAN 204  or permission.
  
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    SPAN 305 - Spanish for Business

    (3 cr) A course that will focus on the language of business, commerce, and management with the purpose of enabling the student to function better in a job market that requires language specific skills. Through oral and written exercises, students will learn to deal with business situations in the Spanish speaking world. Prerequisites: SPAN 204  or permission.
  
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    SPAN 306 - Peninsular Culture and Civilization

    (3 cr) Based on current documentation (literature and film) of contemporary society in Spain, the course strives to give students an understanding of these cultures from a political, historical, social, and literary perspective. This is also an important course for business majors interested in a minor in Spanish to enhance their employment prospects. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 /302  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    SPAN 307 - Latin American Culture and Civilization

    (3 cr) Based on current documentation (literature and film) of contemporary society in Latin America, the course strives to give students an understanding of these cultures from a political, historical, social, and literary perspective. This is also an important course for business majors interested in a minor in Spanish to enhance their employment prospects. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 /302  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    SPAN 310 - Survey of Spanish Literature I

    (3 cr) An introduction to the study of literary movements from the Middle Ages to the Golden Age highlighting major representative works. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 311 - Survey of Spanish Literature II

    (3 cr) A study of the major literary and philosophical movements in Spain from the 18th through the 20th centuries. The student will be exposed to examples of theater, prose, and poetry. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 312 - Survey of Latin American Literature I

    (3 cr) An introduction to the study of Latin American literature through representative works. Students engage in an examination of the literature of the New World beginning with the conquest and going on to Romanticism. Literary study will include analysis of prose and poetry. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 313 - Survey of Latin American Literature II

    (3 cr) A continuation of major literary movements in Latin America from post-Modernism to the present. Through the study of prose and poetry, students will be exposed to the social, artistic, and historical aspects of Latin America that these works evoke. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 367 - Spanish and Latin American Film Studies

    (3 cr) An in-depth critical study of selected films. Course content will be determined by the individual instructor, but can cover any aspect of Spanish and Latin American cinema, i.e., films of any time period, any genre, or any Spanish-speaking country. The language of instruction is Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 400 - Survey in Spanish I: Hispanic Short Story

    (3 cr) This course is a study of the short story (cuento) in Spain and Latin America from its beginnings to the contemporary period with representative readings. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    SPAN 401 - Survey in Spanish II: Hispanic Drama

    (3 cr) This course is a study of drama in Spain and Latin America from its beginnings to the contemporary period with representative readings. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 402 - Survey in Spanish III: Hispanic Novel

    (3 cr) This course is a study of the novel in Spain and Latin America from its beginnings to the contemporary period with representative readings. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 403 - Survey in Spanish IV: Hispanic Poetry

    (3 cr) This course is a study of poetry in Spain and Latin America from its beginnings to the contemporary period with representative readings. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 404 - Spanish Linguistics

    (3 cr) This course provides an in-depth examination of Spanish linguistics as applied to the Spanish language with a concentration in phonetics, morphology, syntaxes, and semantics. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    SPAN 405 - Seminar in Literature I

    (3 cr) A seminar course focusing on a literary genre, movement, period, or figure chosen by the instructor and approved by the coordinator. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and present a series of short written and oral reports related to the topic chosen for study. The student is also responsible for submitting a major documented paper which individually investigates an aspect of the topics of the course as a whole. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 406 - Seminar in Literature II

    (3 cr) A seminar course with the same format and requirements as SPAN 405 but concentrating on a different genre, movement, period, or figure chosen by the instructor and approved by the coordinator. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 407 - Seminar in Literature III

    (3 cr) A seminar course with the same format and requirements as SPAN 405  but focusing on a different genre, movement, period, or figure chosen by the instructor and approved by the coordinator. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 410 - Practicum in Spanish

    (3 cr) A course designed in alliance with the Washington Semester program or co-op program to allow University credit for practical work experience in the Washington/Baltimore areas. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 , and permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 411 - Study Abroad

    (3 cr) Shepherd University will offer a series of study abroad opportunities during the summer. The department has scheduled trips to Argentina and Peru, and future offerings will likely include other Spanish-speaking countries. Students will produce a paper upon their return in order to get credit for this course. Prerequisites: Repeatable to 9 hours.
  
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    SPAN 415 - Spanish Phonetics/Phonology

    (3cr) The purpose of this course is the study of Spanish phonetics and phonology, which will entail an introduction on the basics of linquistic studies and a closer examination of two of the basic tenets of linquistic research: phonetics (the study of the sounds from the physical point of view) and phonology (the study of relationships between the sounds of a communicative system such as a language or a language variety). The study of phonetics will not only include learning about the production of those sounds, but also practices in their proper articulation. Moreover, the couse will also compare Spanish with English. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 SPAN 302 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 416 - Studies in Bilingualism

    (3 cr) The purpose of this course is to examine important aspects fo bilingualism, such as language maintenance, change, and loss, and various characteristics of bilingual speech (convergence, simplification, code switching, loans, etc.). In particular, this course focuses on the Spanish bilingual speakers at all levels of linguistic research (phoentics/phonology, morpho-syntax, lexicon, etc.) by also examining different bilingual communities in the Spanish-speaking world and the United States. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 SPAN 302 , or pemission of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 419 - Independent Study in Spanish

    (1-6 cr) An independent plan of study determined by the instructor and student, with syllabus approved by the department. See detailed requirements for independent study in Section V, Academic Information. This course may be repeated up to 6 hours.
  
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    SPAN 485 - Capstone Presentation

    (1 cr) Under the supervision of a faculty mentor of the student’s choice, the student will propose a project, have the proposal approved by the mentor, and execute the project. Students should concentrate on experiences they have had at Shepherd that would be useful in graduate school or career choices. Projects may include but are not limited to preparation and presentation of a conference paper; development of a substantial Web site; creation of a special workshop for other students in Spanish; and participation in a dramatic performance. Students in SPAN 485 will also develop a portfolio of written work submitted in the major and take a major field achievement test. Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair and of the instructor.

     

    CORE CODES:   CP

  
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    SPAN 486 - Spanish Education Capstone

    (1 cr) This Spanish education capstone presentation serves as a complementary component for the student teaching experience. Working under the supervision of the Spanish specialization coordinator and drawing from experiences encountered in the student teaching assignment or other departmental service or activity related to the teaching profession, the apprentice teacher will participate in the end-of-semester Department of Modern Languages capstone presentations, sharing a teaching unit, a lesson series, a project initiated during the field experience, or a project or activity completed in the Department of Modern Languages that relates to the teaching profession. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

     

    CORE CODES:   CP


Theater (Contemporary)

  
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    THEA 100 - Introduction to Contemporary Theater Context

    (1cr) This course facilitates the reading and discussion of current events as presented by main stream media outlets and social media formats. The course will explore these topics as reflected in contemporary theater themes and general contexts within Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, West Virginia, and the country. This course is required for the Contemporary Theater Studies major.

     

    CORE CODES :   FY

  
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    THEA 200 - CATF Internship I

    (1-6cr) The internship connects the student to the professional theater company in residence at Shepherd – The Contemporary American Theater Festival. Students will study in all departments of the company giving them a general experience of the professional theater. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    THEA 202 - Introduction to Playwriting

    (3cr) Introduction to play structure, literary analysis and playwriting styles. Emphasis on writing stories and transcribing into theatrical events. Prerequisites: ENGL 215  or permission of instructor.
  
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    THEA 203 - Acting I

    (3 cr) Fundamentals of acting. Basic theories and concepts in stage acting for the beginning student. Emphasis on relaxation techniques and improvisation exercises.
  
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    THEA 204 - Introduction to Theater

    (3 cr) Develops an appreciation and understanding of theater as a fine art through normal lecture and attendance at live theater productions. Emphasis on the artists of the theater including playwrights, directors, designers, and actors.

     :  AR   GL   MD

  
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    THEA 205 - Theater Technology

    (3 cr) Technical fundamentals of scenery, costumes,lighting, sound and projections through formal lecture and practical crew experience. Laboratory requirements include assignments on construction and running crews.
  
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    THEA 206 - Script Analysis

    (3cr) Fundamentals of reading scripts analytically and exploring the ways literary devices translate to the elements of theatrical production.
  
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    THEA 207 - Theater Practice

    (3cr) Assigned theater projects supervised by faculty.  Previously titled Theater Practice II. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: THEA 205  or permission of instructor.
  
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    THEA 300 - CATF Internship II

    (1-6cr) The internship connects the student to the professional theater company in residence at Shepherd – The Contemporary American Theater Festival. Students will study in a specific area of the company and follow advance level curriculum within the specialization. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    THEA 302 - Playwriting II

    (3cr) This course will begin with short scene writing leading to the creation of full-length theatrical pieces. CATF playwrights will function as guest artists to facilitate the writing and reading process of the new works. Previously titled Playwriting and Script Study II. Prerequisites: ENGL 474  or THEA 202  or permission of instructor.
  
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    THEA 303 - Designing New Works

    (3cr) The course will focus on the relationships of collaborators in the creation of a new play and specifically the use of scenic, costume, lighting, sound and projection designers as they adapt the vision of a developing new work. Prerequisites: ART 103  or permission of instructor.
  
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    THEA 307 - Advanced Theater Practice

    (1-6cr) Assigned theater projects supervised by faculty. Prerequisites: THEA 207  or permission of instructor.
  
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    THEA 309 - Directing I

    (3 cr) Fundamentals of directing stage plays. Emphasis on the work of the director in relation to the actor, designer, and text analysis.
  
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    THEA 310 - Production

    (3 cr) Advanced studies in theater technology. Emphasis on assigned theater projects. Consent.
  
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    THEA 311 - Directing II

    (3 cr) Advanced directing examines the work of the director in relationship to the rehearsal process. Assigned project. Prerequisites: Directing I , consent.
  
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    THEA 312 - Acting Studio I

    (3 cr) Basic process work to prepare the student for scene study. Emphasis on modern/contemporary scenes and monologues. Prerequisites: Acting I , consent.
  
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    THEA 314 - Acting II

    (3 cr) Fundamentals of scene study work. Emphasis on character analysis and the importance of exercise work and its relationship to a text. Previously titled Acting Studio II.
  
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    THEA 316 - Advanced Acting Studio

    (3 cr) Advanced scene study work. Emphasis on ensemble work and its relationship to performance. Assigned project. Consent.  Previously titled Acting Studio III.
  
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    THEA 340 - Stage Management

    (3 cr) Detailed study of the role of the stage manager. Examines production duties, the rehearsal process, performances, and post-production.
  
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    THEA 341 - History of the Theater

    (3 cr) The development of the theater with special attention to period theaters and theatrical styles which influence modern stage productions. Prerequisites: ENGL 102  or permission of instructor.

     

    CORE CODES :   WM

  
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    THEA 342 - Contemporary Theater History

    (3cr) A survey of the beginning of the regional theater movement through the contemporary practice of devising work.
  
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    THEA 343 - History of Theater II

    (3cr) In-depth study of selected people, periods, subjects, and scripts from the 19th Century Popular Theater through the 1940s which influence contemporary theater practices.
  
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    THEA 346 - Theater Design

    (3 cr) A study of the theory and practice of theater design. Emphasis on scenery, lighting, and costume design. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
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    THEA 360 - Arts Management

    (3cr) This course provides a practical approach to understanding arts management in arts-focused and -driven organizations. Topics include facilities management, leadership, programming, audience development, board relations, marketing and sales, and fundraising.
  
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    THEA 490 - Theater Capstone

    (3cr) Students planning to graduate in May, August, or December must enroll in Capstone during the spring semester prior to graduation. Professionals in the discipline conduct an exit review to determine preparedness of the student to compete for placement in graduate school and the professional world. Students will be expected to assume a major role in creating a theater work.

    CORE CODES :  CP


University Studies

  
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    UNIV 100 - College Prep

    (1cr) A college preparatory course offered for high-school juniors and seniors through the Dual Enrollment Program. This dynamic learning experience rooted in academic achievement, personal growth, and college exploration will help high school students learn valuable skills to prepare them for college success.

Washington Semester

  
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    WASH 390 - The Washington Semester Internship

    (6-12 cr) The Washington Semester program supplements classroom learning with practical knowledge, by providing work experience in agencies and organizations in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Each intern works four full days a week in a setting that is matched to the student’s skills, interests and career goals. The program is open to all majors, provided the student has a 2.5 GPA and has completed one-half of the requirements for graduation before the beginning of the internship. Other requirements are detailed in the Program’s norms and procedures, copies of which are available from the Washington Semester program coordinator and the department chairpersons. All Washington Semester interns must also register for WASH 391 .
  
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    WASH 391 - The Washington Semester Seminar

    (3 cr) Open only to registrants in WASH 390 . This interdisciplinary seminar meets once a week to examine American society through analysis of one or more basic concepts from a variety of academic perspectives. It provides a larger framework of understanding for participants in the Washington Semester internship experience. Members of the seminar write a major research paper.
 

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