Oct 06, 2022  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Education (Graduate)

  
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    EDUC 564 - Advanced Methods: High Incidence Disabilities

    (3cr) The purpose of this course is to assist students in developing a solid foundation for understanding learning acquisition and behaviors of children with learning disabilities and emotional/behavioral disabilities. Students will learn methods of teaching such as learning strategies and will also learn about functional behavior assessment and positive behavior intervention strategies. Field experience is a required aspect of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 525 , EDUC 560 , and EDUC 562 . Corequisite: EDUC 566 .
  
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    EDUC 566 - Advanced Methods: Low Incidence Disabilities

    (3cr) The focus of this course is to introduce prospective teachers to students who have low incidence disabilities with a focus on intellectual disabilities. This course will include definitions, etiology, prevalence, and characteristics of individuals with intellectual disabilities.  Additionally, students in this course will investigate service delivery, roles of various professionals, current trends and philosophies related to persons with intellectual disabilities.  Learning characteristics, teaching strategies, instructional settings, legal issues, ethics and assessment regarding individuals with intellectual disabilities will also be examined. Prerequisites: EDUC 525 , EDUC 560 , and EDUC 562 . Corequisite: EDUC 564 .
  
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    EDUC 581 - Social Foundations of American Education

    (3cr) This foundational course will engage students in the critical examination of the psychosocial and sociopolitical relationships among schooling, educational policy, and leadership in the U.S. Elements regarding the origin, purposes, underlying philosophical assumptions, cultural contexts, and implications for schooling will be examined through research, analytical inquiry, critical thinking, and reflective dialogue. This course requires a 10 hour service learning project.
  
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    EDUC 582 - Learning in Contexts

    (3cr) This course provides the opportunity for reflective inquiry into the nature of knowing. Learners actively and with determination construct an understanding of their world. This course delves into the social and psychological conditions that shape learners, as well as the conditions that teachers can create to maximize learners’ development into empowered human beings who can live fruitfully in a democratic society. This course involves a 20 hour practicum in a classroom consistent with the candidate’s area of specialization.
  
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    EDUC 583 - Planning, Conducting, and Assessing Instruction

    (3cr) This course provides teacher candidates and practitioners with the opportunity to develop their ability to plan, conduct, and assess integrated lessons in their content area. Teacher candidates will develop their ability to teach content materials effectively by integrating state standards, instructional strategies for diverse learners, and appropriate and varied assessment strategies. This course requires a 37 hour clinical field experience in a classroom consistent with the candidate’s area of specialization.
  
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    EDUC 584 - Classroom Ecology

    (3 cr) This course introduces teacher candidates and practitioners to elements and dynamics of the ecology of the classroom, and helps teacher candidates manage and design the physical and social elements of their classrooms. Language, literacy, identity, class, culture, and motivation for all learners in the classroom will be examined. Learning experiences include a field placement where social and physical ecological systems can be examined in the classroom and engineered to improve learning experiences for all learners.
  
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    EDUC 585 - Content Pedagogy

    (3 cr) This course is designed to promote the development of a philosophical and principled understanding and a commitment to effective pedagogy and curriculum, as well as the practical strategies to implement such an educational program for learners. The course is organized around general pedagogical issues. Students are required to attend the undergraduate special methods course related to their specialization as part of this course’s requirements.  This course requires a 20-hour clinical field experience.
  
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    EDUC 586 - Reading I: Literacy Acquisition and Developmental Reading

    (3cr) This course is designed to be an initial study of language acquisition, emergent literacy, and the reading process with a focus on PreK-3 readers. In the course, students will also explore current methodologies and materials for effectively implementing subject specific-reading strategies into early elementary classrooms. This course requires a 35 hour placement in a primary grade classroom (K-2).
  
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    EDUC 587 - Reading II: Diagnosing and Correcting Reading Difficulties

    (3cr) This course is designed as a continuation of EDUC 586 - Reading I: Literacy Acquisition and Developmental Reading . The course provides prospective teachers with opportunities to develop and broaden their knowledge of language arts, to become informed in the strategies used to teach language arts, and to explore methods used in the implementation of those strategies. An emphasis is on diagnostic reading devices and techniques for upper elementary students. This course requires a 35 hour placement in an intermediate grade classroom (3-5). Prerequisites: EDUC 586 - Reading I: Literacy Acquisition and Developmental Reading 
  
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    EDUC 588 - Integrated Pedagogy

    (3cr) This course is designed to promote the development of teachers who have a philosophical and principled understanding and a commitment to an integrated curriculum and the practical strategies to implement such an educational program for learners. The course focuses on making instructional decisions and selecting learning outcomes based on standards-based curricula, research-driven methodologies that grow out of the constructivist orientations, and the social and psychological conditions that impact learning. This course requires a 35 hour placement in an elementary classroom (K-5).
  
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    EDUC 589 - Reading and Responding to Children’s Literature

    (3 cr) A course to familiarize the teacher candidate with the characteristics and wide array of children’s literature and how it can be used to enhance reading programs as well as to encourage the development of reading skills in reluctant readers in the regular classroom.
  
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    EDUC 590 - Student Teaching Seminar

    (1-3cr) This course is intended as a supportive resource for teacher candidate completion of the teacher performance assessment (TPA). The TPA is a performance-based assessment of readiness to teach which focuses on student learning. As a performance-based assessment, the TPA is designed to engage teacher candidates in demonstrating their understanding of teaching and student learning. Candidates complete tasks and commentaries relevant to specialization programs. The completion and passing of the TPA is the responsiblity of the student teacher. This course is intended to provide support to teacher candidates; the university and course instructors cannot guarantee a student’s outcome on it. The responsiblity for performance on the TPA is solely that of each individual student. For students enrolled in the 3 credit option, the course also focuses on critical reflection regarding effects of teacher actions on others, developing skills as a reflective practitioner, presents research-based rationales for instructional decision-making, and helps prepare student teachers for their first teaching position.
  
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    EDUC 599 - Special Topics: Education

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of Education.
  
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    EDUC 600 - Student Teaching Elementary Grades K-6

    (6 cr) Provides an in-depth clinical experience in the public school at grade levels K-6, under the supervision of experienced and certified personnel. The experience provides opportunity to plan, teach, and manage a classroom to demonstrate competency related to knowledge, performance, and dispositions for the content area(s) taught and the developmental levels of public school students assigned.
  
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    EDUC 601 - Student Teaching Secondary 5-12

    (6 cr) Provides an in-depth clinical experience in the public school, at grade levels 5-12 under the supervision of experienced and certified personnel. The experience provides opportunity to plan, teach and manage a classroom to demonstrate competency related to knowledge, performance, and dispositions for the content area(s) taught and the developmental levels of public school students assigned.
  
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    EDUC 602 - Student Teaching Secondary 9-12

    (6 cr) Provides an in-depth clinical experience in the public school, at grade levels 9-12 under the supervision of experienced and certified personnel. The experience provides opportunity to plan, teach and manage a classroom to demonstrate competency related to knowledge, performance, and dispositions for the content area(s) taught and the developmental levels of public school students assigned.
  
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    EDUC 603 - Student Teaching Pre-K-Adult

    (6 cr) Provides an in-depth clinical experience in the public school, at grade levels Pre-K-12 under the supervision of experienced and certified personnel. The experience provides opportunity to plan, teach and manage a classroom to demonstrate competency related to knowledge, performance, and dispositions for the content area(s) taught and the developmental levels of public school students assigned.

Education: Administrative Leadership (Graduate)

  
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    EDAL 540 - Dynamics of Leadership

    (3cr) This course explores the role of leadership in modern education. Student learn leadership styles, effective communication skills, group processes, team building, and conflict management. This course explores modern day school culture, strategic planning, impact of global issues on school culture and the heirarchy of school organizations.
  
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    EDAL 541 - Special Education Leadership

    (3cr) The course explores the role of school administration and leadership in special education. This course is designed to provide administration and other special education stakeholders with a basic understanding of key points in the history of special education law and policy. It focused primarily on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its core concepts with particular attention to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE). This course provides a working knowledge of IDEA’s procedural requirements, the preferred practices associated with implementing the procedures in schools, criticism of these practices and their implementation, and ideas for addressing these criticisms in ways that promote more equitable and inclusive special education practices.

Education: Curriculum and Instruction (Graduate)

  
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    EDCI 501 - Introduction to Educational Research

    (3cr) This course guides educators through the process of creating a unique and valuable research study. This course prepares students on the proper methodology for defining an area of research, reviewing the related literature, and conducting an effective study. This course provides foundational research knowledge such as Institutional Review Board process, an introduction to APA writing style, and how to write a literature review. Previously offered as EDUC 501 Methods of Educational Research.
  
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    EDCI 532 - Advanced Curriculum and Pedagogy

    (3cr) In this course participants explore the historical and philosophical aspects of school curriculum, theories, trends and curriculum structure. Emphasis is placed on examining the current curriculum theories, issues and trends as they relate to content, curriculum design and development, and the relationship between curriculum and pedagogy. Prerequisites: Curriculum structure course or permission of program coordinator.
  
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    EDCI 578 - Advanced Educational Research Methods

    (3cr) This course focuses on quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students explore various ways to obtain data using both types of research methods. Students begin to make decisions about their thesis research and associated research measures.
  
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    EDCI 579 - Action Research Methodology and Thesis Experience

    (6cr) This course teaches students action research methodology and prepares them for their action research thesis experience. During this course students learn what action research is, how to craft research questions, what are potential action research designs, effective research measurements and the basics of writing a research thesis. Students are expected to complete the first three chapters of the thesis. Students will complete and submit IRB proposals. Previously offered as EDUC 579, Action Research Methodology, 3cr. Prerequisites: All core curriculum courses.
  
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    EDCI 580 - Action Research Thesis Experience

    (6cr) This course is designed to allow students to conduct the study they designed in EDUC 579. Students conduct the research, gather and analyze data, and complete the final chapters of the thesis. Students complete comprehensive exams. Previously offered as EDUC 580, 3cr. Prerequisites: EDCI 579 .

Engineering

  
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    ENGR 100 - Freshman Seminar

    (1 cr) This course provides beginning freshman students with information and tools to prepare them for a successful life as a student. This course is aimed at developing the cognitive skills required in computer, mathematics, and engineering courses. The activities in this course are designed to introduce the student to an academic support system through which freshman students can explore various concentrations in computer science, mathematics, and engineering and learn academic success strategies including developing a support network. This course also helps students develop good wellness habits that have lifelong benefits.

    CORE CODE:  FY

  
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    ENGR 101 - Engineering I

    (3 cr) Topics include developing engineering design and problem-solving techniques including group projects and team work, basic engineering design concepts; spreadsheet programming; MathLab, dimensional analysis, use of computer, data, analysis, design, design process, visualization, material science, vector analysis, technical report writings and engineering ethics, professional and ethical responsibilities; and technical library and internet research. Prerequisites: Satisfactory math placement score , or MATH 108  or MATH 155  or higher.
  
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    ENGR 102 - Engineering II

    (3 cr) Topics include an introduction to computing environments for solving engineering problems including computer-aided engineering (CAE), mathematical packages, and structured programming processes including algorithms, pseudo code, and editing and debugging with the C++ programming language.  Applications include topics from numerical analysis and graphical representations. Corequisite: MATH 207 .
  
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    ENGR 221 - Introduction to Electrical Engineering

    (3 cr) Topics include electrical engineering units, circuit elements, circuit laws, measurement principles, mesh and node equations, network theorems, energy storage elements, RC and RL circuits, unit step response, and second order circuits. Prerequisites: ENGR 102  and MATH 207 .
  
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    ENGR 222 - Electrical Engineering Laboratory

    (1 cr) A laboratory course in electrical engineering, 3 hours per week, to be taken simultaneously with ENGR 221 .
  
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    ENGR 224 - Electrical Circuits

    (3 cr) Introduction to network analysis including sinusoidal (AC) steady state, average and RMS values, phasors, polyphase systems, complex frequency, network frequency response, two port networks and transformers, Fourier methods, and Laplace Transforms. Prerequisites: ENGR 221  and MATH 208 .
  
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    ENGR 225 - Electrical Circuits Laboratory

    (1 cr) A laboratory course in electrical circuits, 3 hours per week, to be taken simultaneously with ENGR 224 .
  
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    ENGR 241 - Engineering Statics

    (3 cr) Examines engineering applications of equilibrium of forces, vector operations, couple and moment of force, resultants (2 and 3 dimensions), center of gravity and center of pressure, static friction, freebody diagrams, equilibrium trusses and frames. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 207  or higher.
  
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    ENGR 242 - Engineering Dynamics

    (3 cr) A course examining Newtonian dynamics of particles and rigid bodies: engineering applications of equations of motion, work and energy, conservative forces, impulse and momentum, impulsive forces, acceleration in several coordinate systems, and relative motion. Prerequisites: ENGR 241 , MATH 207 , and PHYS 221 .
  
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    ENGR 243 - Engineering Mechanics of Materials

    (3 cr) Analysis of stress, deformation, and failure of solid bodies under the action of forces including internal force resultants, stress, strain, Mohr’s Circle, mechanical properties of engineering materials, generalized Hooke’s Law, analysis of axial, bending and buckling loads, and combinations. Prerequisites: ENGR 241  and MATH 207 .
  
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    ENGR 300 - Introduction to Robotics

    (3cr) The course uses a hands-on approach to introduce the basics of modeling, design, programming and control of mobile robot systems. The course introduces fundamental concepts in robotics, including controllers, drive systems, motion, sensors and vision systems, and robotics programming. The format of this course includes lectures, research and reading assignments, and numerous hands-on team experiments using interactive robots that can communicate with humans and other objects using sensors and actuators controlled by developed software apps running inside a microcontroller. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGR 301 - Engineering Thermodynamics

    (3 cr) Basic thermodynamic concepts, properties of pure substances, First and Second Law analysis of systems and control volumes are examined. Prerequisites: MATH 207  and PHYS 221 .
  
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    ENGR 305 - Digital Logic Design and Lab

    (4 cr) Boolean algebra; combinational and sequential circuits, minimization techniques; design-and-build logic subsystems, such as decoders, multiplexers, adders, multipliers, and counters; use of CAD tools. Prerequisites: ENGR 102  or MATH 254  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGR 306 - Analog Electronics and Lab

    (4 cr) Semiconductors, p-n junction diodes, theory and application, bipolar junction transistors, operation biasing and BJT as an amplifier, JFETs and MOSFETs theory operation band applications, class A and C power amplifier, small-signal, low-frequency analysis and design. (Laboratory to reinforce the application of various devices.) Prerequisites: ENGR 224 .
  
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    ENGR 307 - Digital Electronics Design and Lab

    (4 cr) The design of combinational and sequential digital circuits, logic families, Boolean algebra, K-maps, VEM, MSI circuitry, state machines, ASM, timing diagrams, and CAD design. A laboratory design project is required. Prerequisites: ENGR 221 .
  
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    ENGR 320 - Electromagnetic Fields I

    (3 cr) Vector analysis, including gradient, divergence, divergence theorem curl, and Stokes’s Theorem. A study of static electric field including Coulomb’s Law, Gauss’s Law, electric potential, convection and conduction current, electric energy density, Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations, resistance, capacitance. Prerequisites: ENGR 221 , PHYS 222 , MATH 309 .
  
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    ENGR 326 - Signal Processing

    (3cr) Signal types,digital and analog signals,frequency spectrum, signal addition, signal sampling, Nyquist sampling rate, discrete time signal aliasing and folding, linearity, time invariant, causality, convolution, continues and discrete Fourier series (CTFS and DTFS), continues and discrete Fourier transform (CTFT and DTFT), FIR systems, FIR block diagram, Z-transform, pole-zero placement and significance, inverse Z-transform. Previously titled Linear Systems. Prerequisites: ENGR 224  and MATH 310 .
  
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    ENGR 350 - Robotics Seminar

    (1cr) The Robotics seminar course is designed to cover intermediate and advanced topics in robotics. The class includes lectures, readings, research, invited talks,and trips to conferences and workshops in robotics and related areas. It also provides training to our next generation robotics club members and leadership. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ENGR 300  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGR 351 - Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

    (3 cr) This course will examine fluid statics, laminar and turbulent flow of compressible and incompressible fluids, flow measurements, open channel flow, and kinetics of fluids. Prerequisites: MATH 310  and ENGR 242 .
  
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    ENGR 451 - Control Systems

    (3 cr) This course provides an introduction to the analysis, design, and applications of continuous-time linear control systems. The aim of the course is to develop student knowledge and understanding of control system design. It also aims to help the students apply their mathematical skills and knowledge of control system theory to a number of practical problems. At the end of this course, students will be able to model, analyze, and design controllers for simple electromechanical systems. Extensive use of MATLAB control systems toolbox is also included in this course. Prerequisites: MATH 310 , MATH 307 , and MATH 329 .
  
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    ENGR 489 - Engineering Capstone Project I

    (1 cr) Students learn methods and skills for the engineering design process, demonstrate the ability to explore principles of engineering experimentation and design, identity real world projects in multidisciplinary engineering areas, and develop a practical plan to complete the projects (individual and/or group). Approved written project proposals and oral presentations are required at the end of the semester. The written proposal should include problem descriptions, objectives, selected approach, design alternatives, equipment requirements, and time line, as well as ethical, legal, and environmental issues. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

    CORE CODES :  WM   CP

  
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    ENGR 490 - Engineering Capstone Project II

    (2 cr) Students develop and complete the proposed projects by utilizing the knowledge and experience gained from previous courses and by demonstrating the analyses and experiments. Student are required to present work in a professional manner which consists of three parts: comprehensive written reports including research and analysis, oral presentations, and operating working models.   Previously offered as 3 credits. Prerequisites: ENGR 489 .

    CORE CODES :  WM   CP
     


English

  
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    ENGL 101 - Writing and Rhetoric I

    (3cr) Follows one or more related themes including writing, literacy, and/or rhetoric. The goal of this course is to provide students the rhetorical tools to navigate the discourse communities of the university and beyond. This course introduces students to the idea of writing both as a course of study and as a social practice and helps them become flexible writers in a world with increasingly diverse means of communication. Students will study and practice the writing process of academic and public genres and will gain a range of experiences as they learn to write for different audiences. They will not only read the works of published writers but will also read and examine each other’s writing. Previously titled Written English. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on appropriate placement tests.

    Satisfies Tier One Core Curriculum writing requirement.  C or better required.

  
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    ENGL 101A - Writing and Rhetoric A

    (2 cr) The first of a two-semester course sequence that stretches the same material as ENGL 101, in order to give students more time to master the course objectives. This course is designed to enhance critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they support academic writing, literacy, and/or rhetoric. The course will emphasize the study and practice of the writing process.  Students will examine works of published authors, as well as each other’s writing, to augment the course’s focus on the revision process. Students will be required to attend 100 minutes a week of lecture and 50 minutes a week of tutoring. Completing both ENGL 101A and ENGL 101B serves as an alternate to ENGL 101 , and a prerequisite to ENGL 102 . Previously numbered/titled ENGL 100A, Basic Academic Writing I.

      Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on appropriate placement tests.

    Completion of ENGL 101A and ENGL 101B satisfies the Tier 1 ENGL 101 Core Curriculum writing requirement. C or better is required.

  
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    ENGL 101B - Writing and Rhetoric B

    (2 cr) The second of a two-semester course sequence that stretches the same material as ENGL 101 in order to give students more time to master the course objectives. The course will emphasize instruction on the criteria of evidence, style, and sentence-level correctness. Students will be provided with the rhetorical tools necessary to navigate the discourse communities of the university and beyond.  Students will be required to attend 100 minutes a week of lecture and 50 minutes a week of tutoring. ENGL 100A is a prerequisite to ENGL 100B. Completing both ENGL 101A and ENGL 101B serves as an alternate to ENGL 101 , and as such, serves as a prerequisite to ENGL 102 Previously numbered/titled ENGL 100B, Basic Academic Writing II.104  Prerequisites: ENGL 101A .

    Completion of both ENGL 101A and ENGL 101B satisfies the Tier 1 ENGL 101 Core Curriculum writing requirement.  C or better is required.

  
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    ENGL 101S - Writing and Rhetoric I Studio

    (4cr) Follows one or more related themes including writing, literacy, and/or rhetoric. The goal of this course is to provide students the rhetorical tools to navigate the discourse communities of the university and beyond. This course introduces students to the idea of writing both as a course of study and as a social practice and helps them become flexible writers in a world with increasingly diverse means of communication. Students will study and practice the writing process of academic and public genres and will gain a range of experiences as they learn to write for different audiences. They will not only read the works of published writers but will also read and examine each other’s writing. Studio sections spend additional time on process drafting and writing development and meet for one additional credit hour. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on appropriate placement tests. Prerequisite to all other English courses.

    Satisfies Tier One Core Curriculum Writing requirement. C or better required.

  
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    ENGL 102 - Writing and Rhetoric II

    (3cr) Builds on the work completed in ENGL 101 and focuses on a single, thematic rhetorical, cultural, and/or social issue. This course develops students’ fluency with a research process appropriate to various rhetorical tasks, including open, secondary research and, possibly, primary research methods such as ethnography. Students continue to write in multiple academic and public genres for different audiences, though these genres may be more complex and may require greater fluency of rhetoric and its aims. To prepare them for a world of digital communication, students are exposed to reading and/or composing multimodal texts in this course. As with ENGL 101, students will not only read the words of published writers but will also read and examine each other’s writing.  Previously titled Writing for the Arts and Humanities. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 101 , or in both ENGL 101A  and ENGL 101B .

    Satisfies Tier One Core Curriculum writing requirement.  C or better required.

  
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    ENGL 131 - British Literature Travel Practicum

    (3cr) This course is designed to accompany British Literature and the Prominence of Place. Formal papers and a travel journal relating the literature course to the study tour practicum are required for the practicum. Open to freshmen only. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    ENGL 147 - American Literature Travel Practicum

    (3cr) The course is designed to accompany American Literature and the Prominence of Place. Course requirements include travel journal entries and other assignments that will contribute to the travel experience. Open to freshmen only. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    ENGL 168 - Greek Drama Practicum

    (3cr) Students will serve as assistant directors, actors, stage managers, costume or set designers, dramaturges, or will assist in some other capacity for a production of ancient Greek drama under the supervision of the professor. Students will research relevant areas of ancient Greek drama. Open to freshmen only. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 169 - Renaissance Drama Practicum

    (3cr) Students will serve as assistant directors, actors, stage managers, costume or set designers, dramaturges, or will assist in some other capacity for a production of Renaissance drama under the supervision of the professor. Students will research relevant areas of Renaissance drama. Open to freshmen only. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    ENGL 170 - Medieval Drama Practicum

    (3cr) Students will serve as assistant directors, actors, stage managers, costume or set designers, dramaturges, or will assist in some other capacity for a production of medieval drama under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will research relevant areas of medieval drama. Open to freshmen only. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    ENGL 202 - Backgrounds of Literature

    (3 cr) A study of all forms of children’s literature, with emphasis on laying foundations for lifelong enjoyment of literature, giving instruction and practice in storytelling, and establishing criteria and resources for book selection. Only candidates for the degree of bachelor of arts in elementary education and students with a minor or teaching field in library science may enroll in this course. Students in secondary education may, with the permission of the department chair, take this course as an elective.
  
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    ENGL 204 - Introduction to American Literature

    (3cr) A critical study of representative American writers and works, from Native American oral traditions to the present, reflecting a broad range of literary and philosophic ideas and the cultural and ethnic diversity of the American experience.  Previously titled Survey of American Literature.

     :   HM   MD

  
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    ENGL 208 - Introduction to World Literature to 1660

    (3 cr) An introduction to literatures of the world from ancient times to 1660. Previously titled Survey of World Literature I.

     :  HM  GL

  
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    ENGL 209 - Introduction to World Literature since 1660

    (3 cr) An introduction to the literatures of the world from 1660 to the present.  Previously titled Survey of World Literature II.

     :   HM   GL

  
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    ENGL 215 - The Art of Literature

    (3 cr) This course explores the art of literature, specifically how a deeper understanding of form, genre, and style enhances our appreciation of literature and language and our understanding of artistic theory/aesthetics. Through a careful study of literature, students will understand the creative thinking of great writers and sharpen their own creative thinking skills.

     :   AR   GL   MD

  
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    ENGL 216 - Literature in Context

    (3 cr) This course explores how literature can help us understand what it means to be human in a world of diverse cultures and experiences. Through a careful study of literature, students will understand how literature comments upon and shapes culture(s).

     :   HM   GL   MD

  
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    ENGL 270 - Traditional Grammar and Standard English Usage

    (3 cr) This course will focus primarily on the study of traditional grammar and English structures (parts of speech, phrases, and clauses), noting additionally the practical application of standard English usage as apparent in publication and print. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 .
  
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    ENGL 271 - Forms of Creative Writing

    (3cr) A class focusing on the basic elements of creative writing across genres. Students will write creative work.

    CORE CODES :   AR   MD

  
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    ENGL 301 - Introduction to Literary Study

    (3 cr) This course introduces English majors to the discourse, practices, and protocols associated with the study of literature. Emphasis is placed on writing, research, and critical theory (including but not limited to feminism/gender theory, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, New Historicism, and postcolonial theory).The course is the gateway to all English classes above the sophomore-level surveys and must be completed with a C or higher before taking any upper-division classes in the major. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 101  (Written English) and ENGL 102 .

     :   WM

  
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    ENGL 307 - Young Adult Literature

    (3 cr) This course introduces students to young adult literature. With an emphasis on pedagogy, students will read texts reflecting varying backgrounds and subject matters, including writers and characters reflecting diversity of nationalities, races, ethnicities, classes, and genders.  Previously titled Teaching Reading and Young Adult Literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 310 - British Literature to 1660

    (3 cr) A survey of the major works of poetry and prose of British literature from Beowulf through the Renaissance. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 311 - British Literature, 1660-1900

    (3 cr) A survey of major works of poetry and prose of British literature from 1660 through 1900. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 312 - American Literature to 1900

    (3 cr) American Literature to 1900 is an advanced critical study of the major writers, as well as the intellectual and literary movements, of the American experience and literary tradition from its beginnings to 1900. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 313 - World Literature in English from 1900

    (3 cr) A survey of British, American, and Anglophone literature from 1900 to the present with an emphasis on Modernist, post-Modernist, post-Colonial, and contemporary texts. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 315 - Medieval Literature

    (3 cr) A study of representative works from the major medieval genres’ epic, romance, dreamvision, and dramas’ with special emphasis on medieval English literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 316 - Medieval Drama

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of medieval drama, from its beginnings in 10th-century liturgical dramatizations through the late 15th century, with an emphasis on Middle English Corpus Christi cycles, saints’ plays, and morality plays. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 320 - Renaissance Prose and Poetry

    (3 cr) A study of the major non-dramatic poetry and prose of the English Renaissance, including works by Spenser, More, Donne, and Herbert. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 321 - Renaissance Drama

    (3 cr) A study of the major playwrights of the English Renaissance, excluding Shakespeare. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 322 - Hamlet in Context

    (3 cr) A rereading of the received text of Hamlet in terms of the theatrical, historical, and cultural contexts of Shakespeare’s tragic vision. The class will consider the popular tradition of Elizabethan and Jacobean revenge drama, ranging from Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy to Webster’s The White Devil and the apparent source materials of the Hamlet story; the political background and the crisis of authority in Tudor England; four centuries of Hamlet criticism, including romantic, idealistic, Freudian, formalist, feminist, pacifist, and complementarian interpretations of the play. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 330 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature

    (3 cr) A study of the intellectual ideas and the principal writers of the period, including Dryden, Behn, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wollstonecraft, Gray, Burns, and Austen. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 331 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama

    (3 cr) A survey of the major works of British drama (both tragedy and comedy) from the Restoration through the 18th century. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 332 - The British Novel

    (3 cr) A study of the development of the British novel through the works of major novelists of the 18th and 19th centuries. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 333 - Satire

    (3 cr) A study of Enlightenment satire in a classical context. May include works by Aristophanes, Horace, Juvenal, Cervantes, Rabelais, Swift, Pope, Gay, Lennox, and Austen. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 340 - British Romantic Literature

    (3 cr) A study of the significant writers of British Romanticism, with emphasis on the social and intellectual background from which they evolved. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 341 - The Victorians, Seeds of Modernism

    (3 cr) A study of Victorian prose and poetry which reflects both the Romantic literature of the past and the Modernist trends to come. The course will consider writers of the established canon, as well as Pre-Raphaelite poets and painters, the Victorian novel, periodical literature, drama, and fin de siécle writers such as Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker. Attention is given to works which reflect those social and intellectual currents of the political and cultural landscape of the era. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 346 - American Fiction

    (3 cr) Primarily a study of the American novel to the First World War, although key shorter works also may be included. The fiction of major 19th- and early 20th-century writers is discussed in its artistic, intellectual, and social significance. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 347 - American Poetry

    (3 cr) An in-depth critical study of selected American poets from the 19th and early 20th centuries with primary emphasis on the artistic achievements of each figure and on the position each holds as representative of the major literary movements in American poetry from the Romantic through the Modernist periods. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 355 - American Ethnic Literature

    (3 cr) A study of the literatures of various American ethnic groups, focusing on writers of color. Emphasis will be placed on the oral tradition of the ethnic groups and the development of written literatures, with primary emphasis on twentieth-century written texts. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 356 - Appalachian Culture

    (3 cr) Appalachian Culture will introduce students to a wide variety of creative expression from those states which constitute southern Appalachia, particularly West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Kentucky. Students will study cultural stereotypes about Appalachia, unique historical and cultural forces at work in Appalachia, and the rich expression of creativity in Appalachia, including oral and written literatures, visual arts and crafts, and singing and songwriting. Prerequisites: ENGL 301   or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 357 - Contemporary American Poetry

    (3 cr) A study of themes in contemporary American poetry from World War II to present. Discussion will include the influence of postmodernism, postcolonialism, and emergence of ethnic literatures on contemporary American Poetry. The course will also explore experimental poetry. Prerequisites: ENGL 301   or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 358 - Appalachian Literature

    (3 cr) A course designed to survey the rich and diverse literature associated with the geographical region known as Appalachia. Both traditional writers identified with the area, such as Rebecca Harding Davis and Jesse Stuart, as well as contemporary writers such as Denise Giardina, Robert Morgan, Marilou Awiakta, Fred Chappell, and Henry Louis Gates, will be explored in the course. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 360 - Literature, Gender, and Sexuality

    (3 cr) This course examines the ways literature from around the world shapes, contests, expands, and reflects conceptions of gender. In addition to reading fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama, students will also explore the insights of feminist, gender, and queer theory.  Previously titled Literature and the Sexes. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 361 - Short Story

    (3 cr) A careful reading and discussion of selected short stories with the dual purpose of developing students’ critical appreciation and acquainting them with the nature and development of the short story form. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 362 - Modern Novel

    (3 cr) A study of representative American, British, and European novelists of the 20th century, designed to acquaint the students with the themes, techniques, and artistic problems of the modern novel and the relationship of the latter to the basic issues and concerns of modern people. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 363 - Modern Dramatic Literature

    (3 cr) A study of the drama from Ibsen to the present day. Representative plays from Europe, Britain, and America will be read and critically interpreted. The cultural and intellectual background of modern American theater will be studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 364 - Literary Criticism

    (3 cr) A historical survey of major critical trends from the Classical period through the 20th century and a study of contemporary critical theories through practical application to specific literary works. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 365 - Contemporary Literature

    (3 cr) A study of world literature from the 1950s to the present. Representative texts from Europe, Britain, North America, Latin America, and Africa will be read. Emphasis will be placed on postmodernism, postcolonialism, and the emergence of ethnic literatures. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 366 - Women in the Arts and Literature

    (3 cr) A course dealing with issues of creativity and the creative process as explored in the literary, visual, and performing art of women. Class discussion proceeds from a core of literary works dealing with women and creativity: works by Austen, Rossetti, D. Wordsworth, Barrett Browning, Dickinson, Gilman, Rich, Plath, Sexton, Woolf, Drabble, Dinesen, Zelda Fitzgerald, and Walker. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 367 - Film Studies

    (3 cr) An in-depth critical study of selected films. Course content will be determined by the individual instructor, but can cover any topic in film studies, i.e., films of any time period, any genre, or any country presented in English and foreign languages. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 370 - Structure and Evolution of English

    (3 cr) Both a diachronic and synchronic survey of the English language, its history and structure, the course utilizes traditional grammar, structural linguistics, and transformational grammar as a basis for a comprehensive understanding of how language functions-—both written and oral. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 371 - Introduction to Creative Writing

    (3 cr) An introduction to the four basic creative writing genres: poetry, drama/screenwriting, fiction, and non-fiction. Models of each will be studied, and students will write and share pieces in each of these differing literary forms. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 372 - Advanced Composition

    (3 cr) A study of techniques and extensive practice in informative, argumentative, journalistic, and contemplative writing. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.

     :   WM

  
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    ENGL 373 - Creative Writing

    (3 cr) An applied study of basic stylistic and structural techniques characteristic of various forms of imaginative writing, analyzed in selected models, with particular emphasis given to a guided, constructive criticism of student writing submitted for class discussion. Consent of the instructor necessary for admission. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 375 - History of the English Language

    (3 cr) A diachronic study of the English language and its linguistic heritage. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
 

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