May 20, 2024  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

English

  
  • ENGL 377 - Peer Tutoring and Composition Theory

    (3 cr) The course will provide a solid theoretical foundation in composition in order to enable students to improve their own writing as well as that of their peers. Students will receive practice in reading, commenting on, and assessing written work from many disciplines. Prerequisites:  ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 382 - Technical Editing

    (3 cr) This course provides an in-depth study of the types of technical editing found in professional settings and will include exercises in copy editing, collaborative projects, and preparing documents for a specified audience. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 400 - Greek Mythology

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of Greek mythology through discussion of significant Greek and Roman texts read in translation, with emphasis on the historical, cultural, and literary influence that Greek myths have exerted on the thinking and writing of the Western world. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 402 - The Bible As Literature

    (3 cr) A study of the various types of literature found in the Bible. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 405 - Seminar in Language/Writing

    (3 cr) A seminar course focusing the nature and/or structure of language and/or writing, with a topic chose by the instructor and approved by the Department of English and Modern Languages. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and present a series of short written or oral reports related to the topic chosen for study. In addition, the student is expected to submit a major project that individually investigates some aspect of the subject matter of the course as a whole.  Previously titled Seminar in Literature I. Repeatable up to 9 credit hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 406 - Seminar in British Literature

    (3cr) A seminar course focusing on a literary genre, movement, period, or figures in British literature chosen by the instructor and approved by the Department of English and Modern Languages. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and present a series of short written or oral reports related to the topic chosen for study. In addition, the student is expected to submit a major documented paper that individually investigates some aspect of the subject matter of the course as a whole. Previously titled Seminar in Literature II. Repeatable up to 9 credit hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 407 - Seminar in American Literature

    (3 cr) A seminar course focusing on a literary genre, movement, period, or figures in American literature chosen by the instructor and approved by the Department of English and Modern Languages. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and present a series of short written or oral reports related to the topic chosen for study. In addition, the student is expected to submit a major documented paper that individually investigates some aspect of the subject matter of the course as a whole. Previously titled Seminar in Literature III. Repeatable up to 9 credit hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 408 - Seminar in World Literature

    (3cr) A seminar course focusing on a literary genre, movement, period, or figures in world literature chosen by the instructor and approved by the Department of English and Modern Languages. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and present a series of short written or oral reports related to the topic chosen for study. In addition, the student is expected to submit a major documented paper that individually investigates some aspect of the subject matter of the course as a whole.  Previously titled Seminar in Literature IV. Repeatable up to 9 credit hours. Prerequisites:  ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 415 - Chaucer

    (3 cr) A study of Chaucer’s language and art as they are revealed in his works, primarily Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 421 - Shakespeare

    (3 cr) A study of selected plays and the sonnets. Minor emphasis on Shakespeare’s biography and Elizabethan background. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 423 - Milton

    (3 cr) A thorough study of the lyric and epic poems of Milton, including a detailed critical reading of Paradise Lost, viewed within the literary and historical contexts of Stuart and Commonwealth England. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 425 - Major British Authors

    (3cr) A seminar focusing on in-depth study of the life and works of a single major author (excluding Shakespeare) from England, Scotland, Wales, or Ireland chosen by the instructor and approved by the Department of English and Modern Languages. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and submit a major documented paper which individually investigates a significant aspect of the course’s subject matter, in addition to completing other short written or oral assignments.  Previously titled Major Author Seminar. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 426 - Major American Authors

    (3cr) A seminar focusing on in-depth study of the life and works of a single major American author chosen by the instructor and approved by the Department of English and Modern Languages. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and submit a major documented paper that individually investigates a significant aspect of the course’s subject matter, in addition to completing other short written or oral assignments. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 427 - Major World Authors

    (3cr) A seminar focusing on in-depth study of the life and works of a single major world author (non-British, non-American) chosen by the instructor and approved by the Department of English and Modern Languages. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and submit a major documented paper that individually investigates a significant aspect of the course’s subject matter, in addition to completing other short written or oral assignments. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 430 - British Literature and the Prominence of Place

    (3 cr) A cornerstone experience for any English major, minor, or individual interested in British culture or literature, the course is designed to focus on British writers whose work or renown is framed largely by the prominence of place. A travel experience to Britain will accompany the course. Repeatable. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 431 - British Literature Travel Practicum

    (1-3 cr) The course is designed to accompany British Literature and the Prominence of Place. Formal papers and a travel journal relating the literature course to the study tour practicum are required for the practicum. Repeatable. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 445 - Studies in American Literature

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of major American writers of the 19th century with primary emphasis on the artistic achievements of each figure. Some attention also is given to the development of characteristically American philosophical and social concepts as these are evidenced in the works being discussed. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 446 - American Literature and the Prominence of Place

    (3 cr) Geography and region play major roles in shaping the literature called “American.” In this course, students will explore the richness of region as it informs literary periods, particular literary movements or philosophies, and themes associated with nature or place. Repeatable. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 447 - American Literature Travel Practicum

    (1-3 cr) This travel component is designed to accompany American Literature and the Prominence of Place. Course requirements include travel journal entries and other assignments that will contribute to the travel experience. Repeatable. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 468 - Greek Drama Practicum

    (3cr) Students will serve as assistant directors, actors, stage managers, costume or set designers, dramaturges, or will assist in some other capacity for a production of ancient Greek drama under the supervision of the professor. Students will research relevant areas of ancient Greek drama. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  • ENGL 469 - Renaissance Drama Practicum

    (3 cr) Students will serve as assistant directors, actors, stage managers, costume or set designers, dramaturges, or will assist in some other capacity for a production of Renaissance drama under the supervision of the professor. Students will research relevant areas of Renaissance drama. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 470 - Medieval Drama Practicum

    (3 cr) Students will serve as assistant directors, actors, stage managers, costume or set designers, dramaturges, or will assist in some other capacity for a production of medieval drama under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will research relevant areas in medieval drama. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 471 - Creative Writing: Fiction

    (3 cr) A writing course focusing on fiction. Instruction will be given on the techniques and terminology of fiction writing. Models will be studied, and students will read and respond to each other’s writing, using a workshop format. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • ENGL 472 - Creative Writing: Poetry

    (3 cr) A writing course focusing on poetry. Instruction will be given on the techniques and terminology of poetry. Models will be studied, and students will read and respond to each other’s writing, using a workshop format. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • ENGL 473 - Creative Writing: Nonfiction

    (3 cr) A writing course focusing on creative nonfiction. Instruction will be given on the techniques and terminology of creative nonfiction writing. Models will be studied, and students will read and respond to each other’s writing, using a workshop format. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • ENGL 474 - Creative Writing: Drama

    (3 cr) A writing course focusing on drama/screenwriting. Instruction will be given on the techniques and terminology of drama/screenwriting. Models will be studied, and students will read and respond to each other’s writing, using a workshop format. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • ENGL 475 - Creative Writing: Forms of Fiction

    (3 cr) A writing course focusing on fiction and its forms. Models will be studied, and the students will read and respond to each other’s writing, using a workshop format. Previously Advanced Creative Writing. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • ENGL 476 - Practicum in English I

    (1-3 cr) The student serves as a writing tutor, proofreader for The Picket, apprentice in a freshman composition or other Core Curriculum class, or any other departmentally approved activity. This course may be repeated. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 480 - Lead Tutor Practicum

    (1 cr) The student assists the coordinator of the Writing Center in developing instructional materials and resources for Writing Center tutors. This course may be repeated. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 481 - Student Tutor Practicum in the Writing Center

    (1 cr) The student tutor, trained in composition theory and instruction, will serve as a tutor in the Writing Center. This course may be repeated. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 484 - Practicum in Editing

    (1 cr) The student serves on the staff of Sans Merci, the Shepherd University literary magazine, as proofreader, copy editor, student editor, art director, or any other capacity approved by the Sans Merci faculty editors. This course may be repeated. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 485 - Senior Capstone Presentation in English

    (3 cr) Each student in this course will propose a project representing the culmination of his or her work as an English major at Shepherd University, have the proposal approved, and execute a finished project. The student should utilize experiences acquired at Shepherd that would be useful in graduate school or career choices. Projects may include, but are not limited to, preparation and presentation of a conference paper; development and presentation of a substantial Web site; creation and presentation of a special workshop for other students in English; or participation in a dramatic performance accompanied by an in-depth written analysis and presentation. The course will also require students to compile and revise professional documents, such as a resume and job or graduate school application letter, for inclusion in their capstone portfolios.  Previously offered for 1 credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor. 

    CORE CODES:   CP

  
  • ENGL 490 - Independent Study in English

    (3 cr) See Independent Study Program. All plans of study and syllabi must be approved by the Department of English. Prerequisites: ENGL 301  or permission of instructor.

English (Graduate)

  
  • ENGL 507 - Young Adult Literature

    (3cr) This course takes as its focus the reading and teaching of adolescent literature. Through a study of both “classic” and contemporary young adult literature, students will learn how to evaluate this literature for their classrooms. Additionally, they will develop strategies for teaching these texts, including adapting plans for a diverse population of students. At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate a wide knowledge of both young adult literature and the critical and pedagogical conversations around it. They will have read, written about, and presented critical assessments of these texts and conversations. They will also have completed a major project of their own design and will have presented that project to their peers.
  
  • ENGL 530 - Theories of Rhetoric and Composition

    (3 cr) The class examines the theory and practice of teaching writing. This course introduces threshold concepts in contemporary writing studies and uses rhetorical theory as a lens to study the history and practice of writing instruction. Focus is on the application of theory to practice, covering a variety of topics such as pedagogy, assessment, and multimodality.
  
  • ENGL 531 - Chaucer

    (3 cr) A study of Chaucer’s language and art as they are revealed in his works, primarily in Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales.
  
  • ENGL 532 - Shakespeare

    (3 cr) A course built around the life and times of William Shakespeare, concentrating on close readings of representative texts covering all the major genres of his works, including lyric and narrative poems, comedies, histories, tragedies, problem plays, and romances. The goal is to achieve a basic understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s contribution to our literature.
  
  • ENGL 533 - Studies in Milton

    (3 cr) An in-depth study and textual analysis of the lyric and epic poems of John Milton, including a detailed critical reading of Paradise Lost, with emphasis on the ideas and sources of Milton’s Christian humanism and artistic achievement, viewed within the literary and historical contexts of Stuart and Commonwealth England.
  
  • ENGL 534 - Literature and the Sexes

    (3 cr) A study of American, British, and Continental literature exploring the image of woman, also with emphasis on the relationship between the sexes. The course includes works by Aemilia Lanyer, Aphra Behn, Jane Austen, George Bernard Shaw, Henrik Ibsen, Virginia Woolf, and others. Gynocritical, deconstructive, and traditional critical approaches to the works are investigated, along with the social and psychological dimensions of a variety of contemporary gender issues.
  
  • ENGL 535 - American Ethnic Literature

    (3 cr) American Ethnic Literature will provide students with graduate-level exploration and examination of the range of “ethnic” literatures throughout the United States. Students will explore ethnic literatures commonly associated with racial identity—African American, Native American, and Hispanic American—but will also consider the nonracial dimensions of ethnicity. The course will begin with a consideration of the oral backgrounds of ethnic literature and will move on to a consideration of emerging written literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis on autobiographical writings. Finally, the course will provide a longer and more concentrated study of the ways twentieth-century ethnic writers bring their experience of cultural difference to fully developed fiction, poetry, and autobiography. Course assignments will include weekly reading analyses, online discussion, and research with a variety of sources, examinations, and an out-of-class research/analysis paper.
  
  • ENGL 536 - The Internet in Humanities Education

    (3 cr) This course will introduce participants to pedagogical strategies for technology integration in the grade 6-12 classroom. It will cover Web resources in language arts, social studies, and other humanities disciplines, standards-based lessons and Web-based activities created by grade 6-12 teachers nationwide, adaptations for a range of classroom technology configurations, and national standards and programs for technology integration. In addition to writing formal critiques of key theorists in educational technology and reviews of educational Web sites and lesson plans, each participant will create one technology-enhanced unit and one basic Web site for use with their students.
  
  • ENGL 537 - History of English

    (3 cr) This course will explore the story of English, from Anglo-Saxon ties to present, with particular attention given to the interaction between historical and linguistic events as they have shaped the language and the literature of English-speaking people across the world and across time. The course engenders insights and understanding of the varieties of English within this country and around the globe.
  
  • ENGL 539 - Seminar in British Literature

    (3 cr) ENGL 539 will be a seminar course in British literature focusing on a significant literary genre, movement, period, or author selected by the instructor and approved by the department.
  
  • ENGL 540 - Seminar in American Literature

    (3 cr) ENGL 540 will be a seminar course in American literature focusing on a significant literary genre, movement, period, or author selected by the instructor and approved by the department.
  
  • ENGL 599 - Special Topics: English

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of English.
  
  • ENGL 699 - Special Topics: English

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of English.

Environmental Studies

  
  • ENVS 201 - Foundations In Environmental Science I

    (3cr) This course introduces fundamental concepts in environmental studies, with specific focus on human impacts on ecosystem function and biotic interactions. Students explore interactions between humans and earth’s biotic resources, examining topics such as ecosystem conservation, population growth and regulation, food production and pest control. Anthropogenic environmental issues such as biodiversity decline, soil degradation and environmental toxicology and related governmental policies are explored within a social framework that considers both the different environmental impacts and experiences of humans based on geographical region and culture.  Previously titled Dimensions of Environmental Science I (4cr). Corequisite: ENVS 201L , or permission of Department Chair.

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
  • ENVS 201L - Foundations In Environmental Science I Lab

    (1cr) A two hour per week laboratory course focusing on field techniques, equipment and scientific methodologies used in environmental studies, including such topics as microscopy, organism classification, experimental design and interpretation, ecological footprints, biodiversity and food web analysis. Corequisite: ENVS 201 , or pemission of Department Chair.

    CORE CODES :   LS

     

  
  • ENVS 202 - Foundations In Environmental Science II

    (3cr) This course introduces fundamental concepts in environmental studies, with specific focus on energy, earth systems and human resource utilization. Students explore interactions between humans and earth’s abiotic resources, examining topics such as natural resource extraction, renewable and non-renewable energy production, hydrologic resource use and associated global environmental impacts. Human-induced environmental issues such as global climate change, non-renewable resource consumption and toxic and solid waste production are discussed, as well as key governmental policies around these issues. Concepts are framed within a social context that reveals how humans of different cultures and geographical regions both contribute to and experience various environmental problems differentially. Previously titled Dimensions of Environmental Science II (4cr). Corequisite: ENVS 202L , or permission of Department Chair.

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
  • ENVS 202L - Foundations In Environmental Science II Lab

    (1cr) A two hour per week laboratory course focusing on field techniques, equipment and scientific methodologies used in environmental studies, including topics such as scientific measurements, energy conversions and calculations, use of topographic maps, compass, and multimeter, water quality analysis, electrical generators, solar and wind power. Corequisite: ENVS 202 , or permission of Department Chair.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
  • ENVS 298 - Special Topics in Sustainable Food Production

    (1-3cr) Courses on a variety of special topics related to sustainable food production systems. This course may be repeated, with distinct topics, to a maximum of 3 credits.
  
  • ENVS 300 - Integrated Pest Management and Lab

    (4 cr) Pest management is an important aspect of managing our natural resources, from agriculture to forests to wilderness areas. Some pest reduction tactics, like chemical pesticides, are highly effective in the short term but can cause environmental degradation via water and soil contamination or bioaccumulation. This course first examines the pest concept and major factors causing invertebrate organisms to become pests and then explores a range of tactics that may be integrated to manage pests while minimizing environmental degradation. Strategies include biological control, trap crops, cultural methods, pheromone lures, mating disruption, and chemical pesticides. Laboratory exercises will provide hands-on experience with the management of common invertebrate pests. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs).
  
  • ENVS 301 - Wildlife Management and Lab

    (4 cr) An overview of the history of human’s relationship to wild animal life. Examines the principles underlying present scientific management practices; objectives of management of game, non-game, and threatened species; and the roles of individuals and private and governmental organizations related to wild animals.  Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 .
  
  • ENVS 302 - Forestry Management and Laboratory

    (4 cr) The historic and present day relationship of humans to plants on wild lands. Examines the scientific principles underlying proper use of forest and range lands; wood, forage, and water production; fire, pests, and forest management; recreation and wild land management; and the roles of individuals and private and governmental organizations related to wild lands.   Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or one year of biology.
  
  • ENVS 306 - Environmental Policy

    (4cr) This course will examine the role of government in regulating environmental issues. Topics include the development of policy and the tools used to estimate costs and benefits associated with environmental regulations. Topics include endangered species conservation, air and water pollution, carbon emissions, climate change and energy resource exploitation. The laboratory component will include analysis of legislation and in-class debates on current policy issues.  From Fall 2011 to Spring 2016, this course was offered at 3 credits.
  
  • ENVS 309 - Regional Geology and Geomorphology and Laboratory

    (4 cr) Introduction to Appalachian and Atlantic Coastal Plain geology, emphasizing the geologic history of the region, rock formations and their attendant fossil content, regional structural geology, and overall regional geomorphology. This course provides the student the opportunity to become acquainted with the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of our region. The interplay between geology and the environment is significant and will be a major focus of the course.  Previously offered at 3 credits with no laboratory component.
  
  • ENVS 322 - Environmental History

    (3 cr) This course examines the development of the environmental field, emphasizing the persons and events that led the environmental movement of today.
  
  • ENVS 323 - Environmental Ethics

    (3 cr) Ethical implication of decision making dealing with environmental issues, ranging from development to air and water pollution to sources of energy are at the core of study of the environment and major challenges to modern society. Environmental racism, cultural impact and global decision making all link directly with the ethical dilemma regarding environmental issues, all major focus areas of Environmental Studies.  Through discussion and real world examples students will develop decision making skills that allow comprehension of the ethical dilemmas connected with environmental policy and law both in the United States and with broader global perspective.
  
  • ENVS 324 - Environment in Film

    (3cr) Environmental film is perhaps the most common way Americans encounter their surroundings. From cable nature channels to award-winning documentaries, we consume nature films at a far greater rate than we actually engage in wilderness experiences. As such, environmental films shape our understanding of nature and how we interact with it. This course will view and review some of the best environmental films of the last 100 years and create their own environmental films. Students will learn how these films explain the environment and shape our interactions with nature.
      Prerequisite/corequisite: ENVS 201  or ENVS 202  (including labs) or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENVS 340 - Sustainable Agriculture and Lab

    (4 cr) Factors such as decreasing soil fertility, soil erosion, pesticide resistance, increasing input costs, ground water contamination, and demand for chemical-free food and livestock have convinced the agriculture community of the need for new approaches to food and fiber production. This course examines basic design principles and examples of environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture systems. The course examines the application of ecological principles to sustainable management practices that biologically improve the fertility, organic matter content, and soil structure while minimizing or even eliminating the need for chemical applications for control of pathogens, insect pests, and weeds. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and 202  (including labs).
  
  • ENVS 341 - Sustainable Energy and Lab

    (4 cr) This course introduces concepts of energy conservation and management and explores different renewable energy sources that are considered environmentally sustainable. Problems associated with nonrenewable energy use will be examined, and the range of sustainable alternatives will be explored. The fundamentals of passive solar collection, photovoltaics, wind, hydro, geothermal, and biomass will be covered. Economic and social implications for adopting each technology also will be considered. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and 202  (including labs).
  
  • ENVS 342 - Limnology

    (4 cr) This course is a comprehensive introduction to the biological, chemical, and physical conditions affecting life in fresh water, particularly lakes, ponds, and reservoirs. Topics include the linkages between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, limnological techniques and equipment, productivity, pollution, fisheries management, and aquaculture. Major biological components such as the benthos, zooplankton, phytoplankton, macroinvertebrates, vertebrates, and aquatic vegetation will be examined. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 103  and BIOL 104 , or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 .
  
  • ENVS 343 - Aquatic Entomology

    (4 cr) This course introduces the taxonomy and ecology of the insects most commonly found in freshwater environments. Topics covered include insect diversity, behavioral, morphological, and physiological adaptations to specific habitats, population and community level ecology, and ecological relationships with physical and biotic environments. The laboratory will emphasize methods of sampling for aquatic invertebrates, recognition of all orders and major families of aquatic insects, and use of keys for identification of specific aquatic insects to lower taxonomic form. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 103  and BIOL 104 , or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 .
  
  • ENVS 344 - Ichthyology

    (4 cr) This is an introductory course dealing with the classification, ecology, behavior, and physiology of marine and freshwater fishes. The course deals with a variety of topics such as the diversity of fishes, form and function, reproduction and early ontogeny, quantitative fisheries resource management, behavior, fisheries ecology, and conservation. Laboratory topics include collection, ichthyological methods, aging, classification, and identification of worldwide fishes. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 103  and BIOL 104 , or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 .
  
  • ENVS 345 - Sustainable Development and Laboratory

    (4 cr) This course will explore the concept of developing in an economically viable and sustainable manner that conserves environmental and cultural resources. Concepts such as the design of net-energy-producer homes, incorporation of renewable and energy efficient technologies, use of nontoxic or responsibly harvested “green” building materials, farmland preservation, incorporation of common wildlife space, and the nature of community design will be explored.   Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and 202  (including labs).
  
  • ENVS 350 - Sustainable Food Production Practicum

    (1-6cr) A practicum course in which students gain hands-on practice with agricultural production techniques such as seedling, microgreen and plant propagation, raised bed and field production of vegetables, herbs and field crops, with an emphasis on sustainable techniques that conserve soil, water and biological resources. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
  • ENVS 351 - Agricultural Marketing Practicum

    (1-6cr) A practicum course in which students gain experience with techniques used in the harvest, preparation, marketing and sale of produce and agricultural products. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
  • ENVS 362 - Soil Science and Lab

    (4 cr) This course examines physical structure and composition of soil in conjunction with the dynamics of organisms including the microbes and macrobiota within the physical and chemical environment of the soil. The soil classification as well as the role of soils and their biota in food webs and ecosystem processes will be emphasized. The laboratory will provide field and lab techniques used in the study of soil ecology. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and 202  (including labs).
  
  • ENVS 368 - Geology of National Parks and Laboratory

    (4 cr) This course provides an overview of the geology, geomorphology, and historical development of selected national parks. Special emphasis will be placed on regional parks through field trips, visits with park officials and resource managers, and discussions of environmental problems singular to parks. An application of geological method and techniques will enhance students’ knowledge base, providing useful background for student interested in careers in resource management and park administration.  Previously offered as 3 credits without laboratory component.
  
  • ENVS 389 - Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    (4cr) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are being utilized in a number of fields, including agriculture for crop monitoring, insurance for assessing structures, and law enforcement for crime or disaster management.  FAA Part 107 regulates UAV flights, setting the parameters for where, when, and how a UAV can be legally flown. This course will cover the material needed to obtain a commercial drone pilot license associated with the Part 107 guidelines, how to safely pilot a drone, and best practices in data collection, including creating flight plans and proper ground control. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  and labs, or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENVS 390 - Geographic Information Systems

    (4 cr) A course in geospatial concepts, GPS systems, remote sensing and emerging mapping technologies. The course will focus on applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the environmental sciences and other disciplines. These systems employ computers to store, retrieve, transform, and display spatial data and have a myriad of applications in environmental studies and fields such as geography, engineering, sociology, criminology, archaeology. The laboratory focuses on data acquisition, data analysis and vector analysis, using a variety of spatial sources, and introduces current GIS computer software applications. Prerequisites: 4 credits of lab science OR permission of instructor.
  
  • ENVS 391 - Remote Sensing

    (4cr) Remote sensing is the acquisition of information about an object or phenomena without making physical contact, and is utilized in disciplines as diverse as meteorology, hydrology, economics, ecology, wildlife management, and geology. This course will investigate the many varieties of remote sensing employed within the scieinces and applications of these techniques to field analysis. Topics include remote sensing systems and techniques associated with single- and multi-spectral satellites operating in the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Prerequisites: ENVS 390  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENVS 393 - Geospatial Statistics

    (4cr) This course in geometric measures and analytical operations introduces a set of tools and techniques used to elucidate characteristics of geospatial data, such as disperson and central tendency. Techniques employed include spatial statistics, geostatistics, spatial regression and econometrics, spatial filtering, data mining and optimization. Prerequisites: ENVS 391  or ENVS 396  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENVS 394 - GIS Instrumentation

    (4cr) In this course students will learn how to build and use electronic hardware for capturing, storing, and processing spatially referenced information. Topics will include GPS technology, wireless sensor networks, and deploying sensors and image capture equipment on unmanned land, sea, and aerial vehicles. Prerequisites: PHYS 302  or ENVS 390 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENVS 395 - Advanced GIS

    (4cr) An advanced course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in which students explore methodologies of applying GIS to real-world problems. Topics include GIS model building using advanced analysis techniques, 2D, 3D and GIS visualizations and animations, collaborative web mapping and scripting. Students will complete individual term projects that employ GIS to address specific research questions in environmental science or other disciplines. The laboratory component includes both online and in-class GIS modeling with data and questions drawn from current real-world problems or questions. Prerequisites: ENVS 390 .
  
  • ENVS 396 - Photogrammetry

    (4cr) Photogrammetry is the science of making geospatial measurements from photographs and has extensive environmental, military, commercial, planning and humanitarian applications. This course will cover photogrammetry as employed within the sciences and applications of these techniques to field analysis. Topics include photogrammetric systems, techniques in the visible and infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, digital imagery and applications such as topographical mapping, archeological discovery and geological investigations. Prerequisites: ENVS 390  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENVS 401 - Conservation Ecology

    (4 cr) An environmentally focused course emphasizing the varied aspects of the structure, function, and perpetuation of ecosystems. Societal impact on ecosystem structure will be considered through discussion and laboratory analysis, with the recognition of ecosystem disruption a major course focus. Representative topic areas include analysis of aquatic marine populations, types of ecosystems, population regulation, and energy flow. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 208  and BIOL 209 .
  
  • ENVS 422 - Stream Ecology

    (4 cr) This course examines the physical, chemical, and biological processes in steam ecosystems. The emphasis is to understand ecological structure and function and to assess anthropological and natural impacts on ecological function. Students in the course will conduct basic aquatic field sampling and laboratory analysis of physical, chemical, and biological components and test hypotheses related to environmental assessment. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 103  and BIOL 104 , or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 .
  
  • ENVS 441 - Hydrology and Lab

    (4 cr) This course will focus on the dynamic nature of earth’s surface and subsurface waters and the impact of human exploitation of these water resources. Techniques for monitoring and analyzing both surface and subsurface waters will be presented and practically applied as part of the laboratory component. Water quality standards and the criteria on which these standards are based will also be addressed in this course. Coursework assumes knowledge of basic algebra. Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 .
  
  • ENVS 461 - Environmental Research

    (1-6cr) Individual research undertaken with supervision and mentoring by a Shepherd University faculty member or in conjunction with an internship at an external environmental organization, agency or industry in which students can apply their environmental background in a practical form. External internships require prior approval from the Department Chair. Environmental Research may be taken during any semester. Previously titled Environmental Internship (3cr). This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Department Chair approval.
  
  • ENVS 462 - Environmental Capstone

    (4cr) A writing and quantitative research capstone course completed by every Environmental Studies major during the final semester. Literature review, scientific writing, data manipulation and statistical analysis will be covered. Every student will explore an individual research hypothesis, using either meta-analysis or data gathered during an internship or research project, and will synthesize that research in a written format appropriate to the discipline, make an oral presentation before the department and campus community, and develop a professional poster to disseminate their research results. Previously titled Environmental Internship Capstone (1cr).

     :   WM     CP


Environmental Studies (Graduate)

  
  • ENVS 509 - Regional Geology and Geomorphology and Lab

    (4cr) Introduction to Appalachian and Atlantic Coastal Plain geology, emphasizing the geologic history of the region, rock formations and their attendant fossil content, regional structural geology, and overall regional geomorphology. This course provides the student the opportunity to beome acquainted with the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of our region. The interplay between geology and the environment is significant and will be a major focus of the course. Lab required.
  
  • ENVS 522 - Environmental History

    (3cr) This course examines the development of the environmental field, emphasizing the persons and events that led the environmental movement of today.
  
  • ENVS 523 - Environmental Ethics

    (3cr) Ethical implications of decision making dealing with environmental issues, ranging from development to air and water pollution to sources of energy are at the core of study of the environment and major challenges to modern society. Environmental racism, cultural impact and global decision making all link directly with the ethical dilemma regarding environmental issues, all major focus areas of Environmental Studies. Through discussion and real world examples students will develop decision making skills that allow comprehension of the ethical dilemmas connected with environmental policy and law both in the United States and with broader global perspective.
  
  • ENVS 524 - Environmental Film

    (3cr) Environmental film is perhaps the most common way Americans encounter their surroundings. From cable nature channels to award-winning documentaries, we consume nature films at a far greater rate than we actually engage in wilderness experiences. As such, environmental films shape our understanding of nature and how we interact with it. This course will view and review some of the best environmental films of the last 100 years and create their own environmental films. Students will learn how these films explain the environment and shape our interactions with nature. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.

Finance

  
  • FINC 250 - Financial Literacy and Well Being

    (3cr) This course will equip students with fundamental concepts of financial education and planning. Students will be able to apply their understanding of financial concepts in their relevant life situations to provide for lifelong healthy financial decision-making and well being.

     

    CORE CODES :   WE

  
  • FINC 300 - Introduction to Financial Management

    (3 cr) An introduction to the methods of corporation finance with an emphasis on applied problem solutions. Particular attention is given to financial decision making and risk analysis. Previously numbered BADM 300. Prerequisites: ACCT 202  and BADM 224 .
  
  • FINC 301 - Money Markets and Financial Institutions

    (3 cr) An analysis of the U.S. financial system, its major participants, its role in the process of economic activity and development, and its procedures for assessing and pricing risk. Previously numbered BADM 301.
  
  • FINC 302 - Intermediate Financial Management

    (3 cr) A continuation of the material in FINC 300. Emphasis on capital budgeting, risk, capital structure and dividend policy, working capital management, mergers and acquisitions, financial distress, and international corporate finance. Case studies and computer exercises are included. Previously numbered BADM 302. Prerequisites: FINC 300 .
  
  • FINC 308 - Introduction to Financial Planning

    (3cr) A comprehensive introduction course on the fundamentals of financial planning. A review of the financial planning process and regulatory practices in the field of financial planning will be completed. Topics include personal cash flow, asset and liability management, life cycle financial planning (i.e., insurance), investment management, tax planning, and retirement and estate planning. Client communication strategies will also be examined. The ethical and legal issues in the planning process will be surveyed throughout the course. Previously titled Financial Planning and Insurance.
  
  • FINC 401 - Financial Analysis

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of the theories and techniques of corporate financial management. An analysis of the procedures for extracting information from the corporate information system and modifying it for use in financial analysis.  Previously numbered BADM 401. Prerequisites: FINC 300 .
  
  • FINC 408 - Advanced Topics in Insurance

    (3cr) An advanced course covering primary insurance topics introduced in BADM 309  in more depth. The main areas targeted include the areas of property, liability, and life insurance with special attention to current topics and events in these areas. Prerequisites: BADM 309 .
  
  • FINC 409 - Financial Services and Commercial Environment

    (3cr) The aim of this course is to appraise the impact of environments, including the economic, socio-political, legal, commercial and technological, on the structure and development of financial and insurance markets. Students will also become acquainted with the operations of various insurance distribution channels, competitive insurance environment and the role played by insurance within the financial markets. Prerequisites: BADM 309 .
  
  • FINC 410 - Property and Liability Insurance

    (3cr) This course will equip students with an understanding of property and liability risks and the effective management of these risks with insurance. Practical applications of property and liability insurance to pure risk exposures, including personal auto, homeowners, mobile homes and watercraft. Special and umbrella insurance will also be explored in detail.  Previously titled Probability for Risk Management. Prerequisites: BADM 309 .
  
  • FINC 425 - Investments

    (3 cr) Examines basic theories and their application to major financial markets: risk and return; market efficiency; portfolio theory; and investment selection and timing decisions. Previously numbered BADM 425. Prerequisite/corequisite: FINC 300 .

First-Year Experience

  
  • FYEX 101 - First-Year Seminar

    (1 cr) The purpose of the First-Year Seminar is to integrate students into the life and culture of Shepherd University and to prepare them with the foundations for academic success. The course addresses the Core Curriculum competencies of wellness, information literacy, and experiential learning.

     :  FY

  
  • FYEX 102 - First-Year Interest Group

    (1 cr) This one-credit course is centered on a common interest shared by a faculty or staff member and the students enrolled in the course. Students will sign up for an interest of their choice; together the students and faculty/staff mentor will explore the interest as well as discuss survival skills for incoming students. The course will consist of small group meetings. In addition to active, participatory experiences that enhance learning, students will complete a wellness activity and an information literacy activity.

     :  FY

  
  • FYEX 200 - Peer Education

    (1 cr) This course provides an opportunity for students who have attended Shepherd University for at least two semesters to assist instructors of First-Year Experience courses. Peer educators will co-facilitate discussions, contact students who miss class, and provide information to first-year students about Shepherd services and programs. Peer educators must have strong leadership, communication, and interpersonal skills and must be comfortable with small group interactions. They must be in good standing with the University and have a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA. They may choose their First-Year Experience course.

French

  
  • FREN 101 - Elementary French I

    (3 cr) A basic, culturally-oriented course in conversational French designed for beginning students who wish to develop skills in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending French. Emphasis is placed on oral communication through dialogue and guided compositions. An online workbook provides additional practice in writing and listening. Effective Fall 2014, no longer fulfills Core Curriculum Tier Two Humanities.
  
  • FREN 102 - Elementary French II

    (3 cr) A continuation of FREN 101 , this course allows students to strengthen their comprehension and speaking proficiency in French by providing extensive practice in oral and written communication and self-expression and through discussions of French texts. Effective Fall 2014, no longer fulfills Core Curriculum Tier Two Humanities. Prerequisites: FREN 101 .
 

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