Oct 06, 2022  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 201 - Principles of Financial Accounting I

    (3cr) An introduction to the basic principles of financial accounting. Includes the journalizing and posting of transactions; preparing basic financial statements; accounting for inventory, cash, accounts receivable, plant assets, and current liabilities in conjunction with sole proprietorships. Previously titled Introductory Accounting I. Prerequisites:
    Sophomore standing.
  
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    ACCT 202 - Principles of Financial Accounting II

    (3cr) An extension to the introduction to the basic principles of financial accounting.  Includes accounting for investments and long-term liabilities, preparing the statement of cash flows, accounting for partnerships and corporations, and analyzing basic financial statements. Managerial accounting concepts are also introduced. Previously titled Introductory Accounting II. Prerequisites: ACCT 201 .
  
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    ACCT 305 - Managerial Accounting

    (3 cr) The application of accounting information by management to make both short-term and strategic decisions. Students learn how to gather, prepare, and use financial information for internal decision-making purposes. Topics include cost behavior, cost allocation, cost-volume-profit analysis, standard costing, capital budgeting, flexible budgeting, and analysis for decision-making. Prerequisites: ACCT 202 .
  
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    ACCT 325 - Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting

    (3cr) An analysis of the environment and characteristics of state and local governmental entities and not-for-profit organizations which includes an in-depth study of basic concepts and standards of financial reporting for such entities. Emphasizes state and local governmental reporting requirements and interactions between government-wide financial statements and financial statements for governmental, propriety and fiduciary funds. Previously offered as ACCT 403 Fund Accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 202 .
  
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    ACCT 329 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I

    (3cr) First course of a three-course sequence which places emphasis on the principles, concepts, and theory underlying external financial reporting. Includes the preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting standards established by recognized accounting bodies. Students must earn a C or better to enroll in the second course. Previously titled Intermediate Accounting I. Prerequisites: ACCT 202 .
  
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    ACCT 330 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II

    (3cr) Second course of a three-course sequence which continues an in-depth study of external financial reporting. Previously titled Intermediate Accounting II. Prerequisites: ACCT 329  with a grade of C or better.
  
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    ACCT 331 - Intermediate Financial Accounting III

    (3cr) Third course of a three-course sequence which continues an in-depth study of external financial reporting and advanced analysis.  Previously titled Intermediate Accounting III. Prerequisites: ACCT 330 .
  
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    ACCT 335 - Federal Taxation of Individuals

    (3cr) An introduction to the Internal Revenue Code and major concepts used in Federal taxation of individuals, including enactment of tax laws, basic tax research and planning, preparation of basic individual tax returns, and exploration of tax policy issues. Previously titled Income Tax. Prerequisites: ACCT 202 .
  
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    ACCT 337 - Volunteer Income Tax Assistance

    (1 cr) Students prepare state and federal income tax returns on a volunteer basis. This is a program (VITA) sponsored through the Internal Revenue Service. Returns are prepared for the elderly and those individuals who cannot afford to go to a paid tax preparer.
  
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    ACCT 339 - Internship in Accounting

    (3cr) A form of independent study which integrates accounting curricula with supervised work experience in the public and private sectors. The primary focus is to provide students an environment to compare the theoretical accounting concepts with the real world application of those concepts while gaining experience and skills in the discipline. Internships generally last no longer than a semester. Interns are employees of the sponsoring company. Previously offered as ACCT 292. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ACCT 329 .
  
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    ACCT 345 - Federal Taxation of Business Entities

    (3cr) An in-depth understanding of the Internal Revenue Code as it relates to business entities, corporations, S-corporations and partnerships. Provides a framework for integrating income tax planning into the business decision-making process. Previously offered as ACCT 435 Income Tax II. Prerequisites: ACCT 335 .
  
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    ACCT 392 - Cooperative Education in Accounting

    (1-6cr) A form of independent study which integrates classroom study with paid, planned, and supervised work experience in the public and private sectors. Students are exposed to the reality of the work world beyond the boundaries of the campus, enhancing their self-confidence and career direction. Co-op students are employees of the sponsoring company and earn a salary and University credit. Generally, sponsoring employers seek upperclassmen with knowledge and background in the discipline. Maximum of three credit hours may be used as accounting elective credit by majors only. Prerequisites: ACCT 329 .
  
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    ACCT 405 - Advanced Cost Accounting

    (3cr) The extension of cost accounting concepts to include job-order costing, process costing, activity-based costing, quantitative cost estimation,  inventory management, pricing decisions, costs of quality, and performance evaluations. Previously offered as ACCT 336 Cost Accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 305 .
  
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    ACCT 420 - Accounting Information Systems

    (3cr) A study of accounting information systems including the concepts of design, implementation, analysis, control, risk, and limitation of systems. The development of skills related to the application and analysis of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and data visualization applications is also covered. Previously offered as ACCT 401 Computer-Based Accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 330  and BADM 450 .
  
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    ACCT 440 - Advanced Financial Accounting

    (3cr) An in-depth analysis of advanced accounting topics including financial statement consolidations, segment reporting, foreign currency translation, and partnership accounting. Previously offered as ACCT 406 Advanced Accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 331 .
  
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    ACCT 450 - Accounting Ethics

    (3cr) An in-depth understanding of the profession’s code of conduct and study of the ethical issues faced by accountants and auditors. Traditional philosophical reasoning methods are introduced to better understand ethical intentions and actions. Through case studies, the student will gain the ability to analyze the ethical issues encountered by accounting professionals and evaluate the appropriateness of the actions taken. Previously titled Ethics in Accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 330   and BADM 312 .

     

    CORE CODES:    WM

  
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    ACCT 460 - Auditing

    (3cr) Study of external financial statement auditing, audit evidence considerations, internal control, transaction cycles, and audit reporting. Previously offered as ACCT 402. Prerequisites: ACCT 331  and ACCT 450 .

     

    CORE CODES:   CP


Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 203 - Introduction to Anthropology

    (3 cr) An introduction to the discipline of anthropology including an overview of the diversity of human culture from both biological and cultural perspectives. The course will examine the four sub-disciplines of the field including cultural anthropology, linguistics, physical anthropology, and archaeology.
  
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    ANTH 225 - Introduction to Museum Studies

    (3 cr) Survey of the history, philosophy, and management of museums including curatorship and public interpretation. Basic examination of the principles of museum exhibit design as well as aspects of exhibit preparation will be emphasized. This course will be essential to students interested in cultural resources in such agencies as the National Park Service.
  
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    ANTH 300 - Introduction to Archaeology

    (3 cr) Course surveys the history, theory, and methodology of archaeology as a subdiscipline of anthropology. Field skills necessary; the scientific collection of data on past cultures will be discussed as well as topics in prehistoric, historic, industrial, and underwater subareas.
  
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    ANTH 314 - Physical Anthropology and Archaeology

    (3 cr) A survey of the origins of humans and the development of prehistoric cultures. A focus on the major forces of human evolution as well as the study of early cultural evolution.
  
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    ANTH 315 - Cultural Anthropology

    (3 cr) Cultural Anthropology is a study of contemporary world cultures with a focus on understanding the patterns of human behavior common to all people. The course will compare and contrast differing cultural world viewpoints related to key social institutions such as family and kinship, religion, economic systems, and politics and power. Cultures are viewed within the context of social change and the impact of the global world on localized cultures with varied levels of social complexity.
  
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    ANTH 316 - Forensic Anthropology

    (3cr) This class introduces forensic anthropology and explores the human skeleton as a means of reconstructing past lives through the archeological and forensic record. Students will study complete and, when available, fragmentary human skeletal remains and learn to identify the bones of the body, and to determine age at death, sex, presence of disease and other pathologies. Discussion topics will focus on archaeological and forensic applications. Students should expect to spend additional time outside of class to examine skeletal remains discussed in class.
  
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    ANTH 345 - Archaeological Field Methods and Lab

    (4 cr) A study of theories, methods, and techniques of archaeology as applied to analysis of environmental impacts on historic and prehistoric sites. This includes the use of social scientific techniques for mitigating the impacts of planned changes to the physical or cultural environment such as site survey, excavation techniques, laboratory techniques, and artifact analysis. This course will provide valuable knowledge on the techniques of data collection used in the study of cultural groups, with these techniques applied to environmental impact statements, urban planning, and resource management. This is predominantly a field-based and laboratory-based course.
  
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    ANTH 370 - American Architectural Heritage

    (3 cr) The role of American architecture as a cultural resource worthy of study and preservation is the focus of this course. Styles and periods of architecture, the consideration of architectural resources in planning and environmental education, and the reflection of American culture in the built environment will be discussed. This course will serve as an elective in cultural resource management and will be essential for students with an interest in urban planning or park administration. Cross-listed HPRE 102.
  
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    ANTH 380 - Historical Archaeology and Lab

    (4 cr) This course will focus on the archaeology of North America, emphasizing the methods of historical archaeology. This course will include laboratory procedures for the processing, identification, analysis, and conservation of historic period artifacts. The evolution of American culture from colonial to recent industrial society will be investigated. This course is essential for students interested in the management of historical parks and sites as well as students who plan to assist in field work and analysis necessary for environmental impact statements.
  
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    ANTH 390 - Native American Ethnography

    (3 cr) A survey of traditional Native American cultures in North America. This course will cover aspects of Upper Paleolithic migrations into the New World, prehistoric developments, and the ethnography and ethnology of traditional and contemporary cultures.

Anthropology (Graduate)

  
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    ANTH 525 - Introduction to Museum Studies

    (3cr) Survey of the history, philosophy, and management of museums including curatorship and public interpretation. Basic examination of the principles of museum exhibit design as well as aspects of exhibit preparation will be emphasized. This course will be essential to students interested in cultural resources in such agencies as the National Park Service.

Appalachian Studies

  
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    APST 256 - Appalachian Culture

    (3cr) This interdisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture will focus on the diverse multicultural traditions of Appalachia as well as how identities are formed, intersectionality, the dominant and marginalized populations, and address historic and contemporary struggles for social, economic, and environmental justice. Students will explore the idea of Appalachia in American consciousness by examining Appalachian regional issues and by comparing Appalachian people with other cultural groups, exploring cultural identity, cultural assumptions, cultural change, and cultural manipulation. Previously numbered APST 356. Prerequisites: ENGL 101  or permission of instructor.

    CORE CODES :  SO   MD

  
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    APST 309 - West Virginia and the Appalachian Region

    (3cr) Emphasis upon the development of western Virginia and the state of West Virginia. This course will examine the general geographical, political, and economic aspects of the southern Appalachian region. The impact upon the Mountain State of the patterns of settlement, the heritage of sectional conflict, the statehood movement, legal and political developments accompanying the assimilation of the area into the national economy, and national events will be considered. The student will view the current problems of the area and contemporary Appalachian society. 
  
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    APST 343 - Appalachian Music and Ethnomusicology

    (3cr) Students will gain an understanding of the role of music within historical and contemporary communities of southern Appalachia–particularly West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Kentucky. The course will introduce students to the field of ethnomusicology by exploring Appalachia’s diverse musical traditions and genres, how they contribute to identity formation, and their contribution to contemporary popular culture around the world. Cultural studies research methods will be employed in the course, and the following musical genres will be explored: Native American music, balladry, sacred music, old-time, bluegrass, blues, coal/work songs, civil rights and other protest music among others. Emphasis will be placed on historical and socio-cultural trends in the region, the roles of women and minorities, and the struggle for social and environmental justice.  Previously titled Appalachian Music. Prerequisites:

      or permission of instructor.

    CORE CODES :  AR   MD

  
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    APST 345 - The Art of Storytelling and Appalachian Folklore

    (3cr) Students will be exposed to the art of storytelling and folktales associated with the geographic area known as Appalachia.  Special attention will be given to the creative art of storytelling, exploration of oral traditions with these genre traditions, and to the ethnic, historical, and socio-cultural reflections found in storytelling and folklore. Previously titled Appalachian Folk Tales and Storytelling. Prerequisites:

      or permission of instructor.

    CORE CODES :   AR   MD

  
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    APST 358 - Appalachian Literature

    (3cr) A course designed to survey the rich and diverse literature associated with the geographical region known as Appalachia. Both traditional writers identified with the area, such as Rebecca Harding Davis, Jesse Stuart, and Ambrose Bierce, as well as contemporary writers such as Denise Giardina, Robert Morgan, Marilou Awiakta, Fred Chappell, and Henry Louis Gates, will be explored in the course. Prerequisites: ENGL 101  or permission of instructor.

     

    CORE CODES :  HM   CK 

  
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    APST 400 - Seminar in Appalachian Studies

    (1-3cr) A course that may be crosslisted with courses in other disciplines or that offers students the opportunity to study related topics to the minor that would enhance the understanding of the area, the people, or the cultural heritage. Repeatable up to 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and approval of the Appalachian studies coordinator.
  
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    APST 430 - Celtic Roots and Global Appalachia

    (3cr) Celtic Roots and Global Appalachia is a course designed to expose students to the Celtic heritage associated with Appalachia through historic, literary, and geographic place. Students will explore the prominence of place as applied to contemporary and/or traditional Appalachian, Irish, Scottish, Welsh or Celtic associated topics and themes. Previously titled Celtic Roots. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites:   or permission of instructor.
  
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    APST 431 - Appalachian Travel Field Experience

    (1-3cr) The Appalachian Travel Field Experience is designed to pair with any APST course with a travel/field practicum component.  The object of the travel is to enhance the content of the course by exploring the places that inspired Appalachian culture, history, art, music, literature, or photography or that have some Celtic connection. Course may be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites:   or permission of instructor.
  
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    APST 476 - Appalachian Studies Practicum

    (1-3cr) The student serves as an assistant and/or researcher for the Appalachian Heritage Festival or a classroom apprentice, works on a special project or does Web design, serves on the Anthology of Appalachian Writers commitee or as a student editor, serves on the AHWIR Committee, or completes some type of service or practical project that benefits the community, the region, the University, or the Appalachian Studies Program, including the Alternative Spring Break service project. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of Appalachian Studies coordinator or Appalachian Heritage Festival director.

Appalachian Studies (Graduate)

  
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    APST 500 - Seminar in Appalachian Studies

    (3cr) A course that offers students the opportunity to study related topics that would enhance the understanding of the area, the people, or the cultural heritage. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and approval of the Appalachian Studies coordinator.
  
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    APST 501 - Appalachia in Time, Place, and People: A Cultural Study

    (3cr) Orients students to geographic, historic, political, recreational, social, and cultural issues and characteristics of the region. Previously titled Appalachia in Time, Place, and People.
  
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    APST 530 - Celtic Roots and Global Appalachia

    (3cr) Celtic Roots and Global Appalachia is a course designed to expose students to the Celtic heritage associated with Appalachia through historic/literary and geographic place. Students will explore the prominence of place as applied to contemporary and/or traditional Appalachian, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, or Celtic associated topics and themes. Previously titled Celtic Roots. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    APST 531 - Appalachian Travel Field Experience

    (1-3cr) The Appalachian Travel Field Experience is designed to pair with any APST course with a travel/field practicum component. The object of the travel is to enhance the content of the course and facilitate research by exploring the places that inspired Appalachian culture, history, art, music, literature, or photography or that have some Celtic connection. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    APST 543 - Appalachian Music and Ethnomusicology

    (3cr) Students will gain an understanding of the role of music within historical and contemporary communities of southern Appalachia–particularly West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Kentucky. The course will introduce students to the field of ethnomusicology by researching and exploring Appalachia’s diverse musical traditions and genres, how they contribute to identity formation, and their contribution to contemporary popular culture around the world. Cultural studies research methods will be employed in the course, and the following musical genres will be explored: Native American music, balladry, sacred music, old-time, bluegrass, blues, coal/work songs, civil rights and other protest music among others. Emphasis will be placed on historical and socio-cultural trends in the region, the roles of women and minorities, and the struggle for social and environmental justice. Previously titled Appalachian Music.
  
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    APST 545 - Appalachian Folk Tales and Storytelling

    (3cr) Students will be exposed to the art of storytelling and folktales associated with the geographic area known as Appalachia. Special attention will be given to research and exploration of oral traditions within these genres and to the ethnic, historical, and socio-cultural reflections found in storytelling. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    APST 556 - Appalachian Culture

    (3cr) This interdisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture will expose students to a wide variety of creative expression from the geographic region that constitutes Appalachia, particularly West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Kentucky. Students will research and study cultural stereotypes about Appalachia, the unique historical and cultural forces at work in Appalachia, and the rich expression of creativity in the area, including oral and written literatures, visual arts and crafts, and singing and songwriting.
  
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    APST 558 - Appalachian Literature

    (3cr) A course designed to survey the rich and diverse literature associated with the geographical region known as Appalachia. Both traditional writers identified with the area, such as Rebecca Harding Davis and Jesse Stuart, as well as contemporary writers such as Lee Smith, Denise Giardina, Robert Morgan, Marilou Awiakta, Fred Chappell, Ron Rash, and Henry Louis Gates will be explored in the course.
  
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    APST 576 - Appalachian Studies Practicum

    (1-3cr) The student serves as an assistant and/or researcher for the Appalachian Heritage Festival or a classroom apprentice, works on a special project or does web design, serves on the Anthology of Appalachian Writers committee or as a student editor, serves on the AHWIR Committee, or completes some type of service or practical project that benefits the community, the region, the University, or the Appalachian Studies Program. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    APST 580 - Appalachian Studies Internship

    (3-9cr) The student will serve as an intern with the WV State Legislature (Robert W. Burk, Jr. Student Intern Program), the National Parks, or some other associated Appalachian entity in the state or region, with the approval of the Director and the APST Board. A nine-hr. approved internship may suffice for both the Service Learning requirement as well as the 0credit elective requirement in the Master of Arts in Appalachian Studies. Work requirements include 50 hrs. per credit. Prerequisites: Permission of APST Director.
  
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    APST 599 - Special Topics: Appalachia

    (1-3cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area associated with the region of Appalachia. This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits, with different topics. Prerequisites: Permission of APST Director.
  
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    APST 602 - Appalachian Studies Thesis

    (3cr) The student will work with the thesis director in completing a research and writing project, with the end goal of professional publication or presentation. Prerequisites: Permission of APST Director.

Art (Contemporary)

  
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    ART 103 - Introduction to the Visual Arts

    (3 cr) An introductory course designed to give insight into the nature of the visual arts and their relationship to contemporary life. Includes a study of the language and functions of painting, sculpture, and architecture. The development of styles, aesthetic principles, and the ideas of art are surveyed. Students are introduced to movements, Western and non-Western, in the history of art that have a strong influence on contemporary art.

     :     AR     GL

  
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    ART 115 - Drawing I

    (3 cr) An introductory course for development of basic drawing skills and practice in the use of various drawing materials. Observation, memory training, and composition are stressed to give the student a wide experience and solid base in the art of drawing.
  
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    ART 140 - Visual Thinking

    (3cr) This introductory course examines the concepts and nature of visual image making while exploring ideas associated with contemporary art making. The student begins to comprehend the function of the visual elements and principles of design to communicate concepts and ideas in a nonliteral way. Previously titled Visual Thinking Skills I.

    Removed from Tier One: FY in Core Curriculum, effective Fall 2013.
     

  
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    ART 150 - Digital Foundations

    (3cr) An introductory course of digital tools, media, and workflow commonly used in photography, art, and design. This course explores the artistic process in a digital platform while reinforcing visual elements and principles.

    NOTE: a student in their first year enrolled full time seeking a BFA in Art, a BA in Secondary Education (Art Education teaching field), or a minor in Graphic Design can request permission to take the department’s Digital Foundations placement test to satisfy the ART 150 Digital Foundation requirement. Upon passing the test, the student will receive 3 credit hours for the course with no letter grade designated. The placement test can be taken only once, requires a fee, and will be offered each semester.
  
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    ART 203 - Survey History of Western Art

    (3 cr) A history of Western art from prehistoric through post-Impressionism with an emphasis on those time periods in the history of art which continue to inspire and influence contemporary art ideas and discussion including non-Western influences. Students will encounter and begin to understand artists and art works that mold the current dialogue and motivation of art making in the 21st century. Prerequisites: ART 103 .
  
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    ART 208 - Professional Practices I

    (3 cr) An entry level prerequisite or corequisite course to enrolling in upper-division bachelor of fine arts courses. This multi-sectioned, disciplined-based course must be taken the second semester of the sophomore year or after completing three courses in the concentration area. Students write a letter of introduction, résumé, and artist statement and assemble a professional portfolio of work. Students acquire interview skills and information essential for professional level competitions or work in their field. Students participate in a portfolio review conducted by a team of faculty at the conclusion of the course. Students must earn a grade of C or better during their portfolio presentation to continue in the B.F.A. program. Prerequisites: ART 140 , and three courses in the concentration area.
  
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    ART 215 - Drawing II

    (3 cr) A continuation of the basic drawing and perceptual skills developed in Drawing I. Prerequisites: ART 115 .
  
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    ART 230 - Painting I

    (3 cr) An introduction to the materials, philosophies, techniques, and processes of the painter. Students will work with acrylic paint and mediums and will approach the creative experience of painting through the study of subject matter, form , and content. Color theory, sketching, and different painting techniques and styles will be emphasized.
  
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    ART 240 - Tools, Craft, and Technique

    (3cr) An introduction to the processes, materials and tools used in fabrication and functional design. Students learn the basics of woodworking and other materials, prototyping and directive oriented drawing in the context of furniture and object design curriculum.
  
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    ART 250 - Sculptural Forms

    (3cr) An introduction to the materials, philosophies, techniques, and processes of Sculpture. 3-D forms and visual language are introduced through traditional and contemporary methods. In this course students explore basic methods of creating physical objects including fabrication, carving, construction and molding. Students will use metal, wood, stone, and plastics to create work that explores visual language as it applies to 3-dimensions.  Previously titled Sculpture I.
  
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    ART 255 - Digital Illustration I

    (3 cr) Introduction and exploration of digital illustration techniques. Assignments will emphasize traditional illustration skills such as visual problem-solving, rendering, and drawing, while exploring the digital possibilities to execute the artwork. Areas of focus include the creation of art for editorial, advertising, publishing and online application. Previously ART 305 - Illustration I Prerequisite/corequisite: ART 115 .
  
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    ART 260 - Printmaking I

    (3 cr) Students are introduced to non-toxic relief processes, intaglio processes, and monoprint or monotype processes of printmaking. Half of the semester is devoted to developing skills and vocabulary of relief processes; the other half of the course is devoted to monoprint techniques and intaglio-type. With each process the student explores the use of value, line texture, and color to create visual images utilizing innovative non-toxic as well as traditional printmaking techniques in relief and intaglio.
  
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    ART 300 - Research Methods for the Arts

    (3cr) Develops an understanding of theory, methodology and practical applications of research techniques specific to the arts and creative industries. Explores the assessment of all research methods and the assimilation of research to expand further study. Prerequisites: ENGL 102  
  
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    ART 303 - Introduction to African Art

    (3 cr) The study and appreciation of African Art places an emphasis on an anthropological approach to viewing art.  The text and the lectures focus on the culture, belief systems, and values intrinsic to the production of what we in Western culture refer to as objects of art. Traditional African languages have no word for “Art” and therefore to understand how Africans view these works there is an emphasis on understanding how and why these works are made, how they function within the society. These objects are utilized to control behavior or police the community, to educate, to heal, and to protect. Through exposure to art and its changing role within the cultures of Africa students begin to appreciate other cultures and to see the comparisons with their own belief systems.

     :    HM    GL

  
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    ART 304 - Special Topics in Art History

    (3-9 cr) This course will vary in content with each offering as areas of particular interest or timeliness not covered by the regular curriculum are explored. Offerings may focus on a specific art movement, time period, geographical location, an individual artist, or a particular topic. Each course offering under this title bears a subtitle which indicates the specific subject to be covered. This course may be repeated for credit when course content is changed.
  
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    ART 310 - Contemporary Art

    (3 cr) A history of art in the 20th and 21st centuries with special emphasis on artists and artwork of the 21st century. A study is made of the history and philosophy of the various movements, their origins and growth, and the relationship of their development to contemporary culture and thought. Through writing intensive exercises, papers, and tasks students begin to comprehend the move from representation to abstraction to art as a form of cultural critique. Previously numbered ART 204. Prerequisites: ART 103  or ART 104.

     :     WM

  
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    ART 311 - Art/Photography Practicum

    (3 cr) This course provides real world experience in the fields of art and photography. Students will be involved in a full studio experience. This course may require students to collaborate with clients or work with other art students to complete a project. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 330 - Painting II

    (3 cr) A continuation of the skills and techniques developed in ART 230 . Compositional experimentation, creative and expressive modes, and evaluation skills are emphasized. Prerequisites: ART 230 .
  
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    ART 340 - 3-D Digital Fabrication

    (3cr) Introduction to digital 3-D modeling and prototyping using 3-D printing, laser/plasma cutting and CNC milling. Students work across a variety of materials in a design oriented curriculum. Emphasis is on creating 3-D virtual models of designs and the process of translating these drawings to working prototypes using digital manufacturing techniques and processes.
  
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    ART 350 - Media and Concept

    (3cr) An exploration of the relationship between material choices, philosophies, and conceptual goals in 3-D and extended media artwork. Working from an infinite field of material choices, students will focus on concept, narrative and form as it relates to material choices. Students also explore the relationship between documentation and the created object, temporary and time-based work.  Previously titled Sculpture II.
  
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    ART 361 - Printmaking II

    (3 cr) Students are introduced to non-toxic lithography processes, intaglio-type processes, and monoprint or monotype processes of printmaking. Half of the semester is devoted to developing skills and vocabulary of the lithographic process; the other half of the course is devoted to monoprint techniques and intaglio and/or intaglio type. With each process the student explores the use of value, line texture, and color to create visual images utilizing non-toxic innovative as well as traditional printmaking techniques in lithography and intaglio.
  
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    ART 375 - Research Studio

    (3-6 cr) This course allows upper-level students to pursue a studio experience during summer school. Approval must be granted by the coordinator of the program in which the student desires to work, and a written plan for summer study must be submitted to both the program coordinator and the faculty member supervising and directing the Research Studio course for the summer. It is expected that the plan involve advanced and challenging ideas reflecting a maturity necessary for some independent pursuit. Prerequisite: 18 hours of art including a minimum of 12 hours in the program area in which the student desires to work.
  
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    ART 390 - Professional Practices II

    (3 cr) This junior level course continues the preparation begun in Professional Practices I. This course is designed to provide the emerging artist with the practical knowledge necessary to understand the workings of the art world and to provide the information necessary to market, sell, and exhibit work. Students will develop promotional packets and materials and learn the importance of documenting work and maintaining accurate listings of employment and clients. Grant writing, gallery representation, contracts, pricing, commissions, arts advocacy, and employment opportunities will also be covered. The business of art, graphic design, and photography will be explored in detail in this multi-sectioned course associated with individual concentration areas. Prerequisites: ART 208 .
  
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    ART 391 - Internship

    (3-9 cr) Individually designed experimental learning. May include field studio or internship placements such as graphic design, museum or gallery work, or work in a professional artist’s studio. Lectures and discussions are utilized to prepare students for intern placement through rum, interviews, job applications, and professional practices in the work place. Prerequisites: ART 390 ; must have completed 30 hours of art in area of concentration.
  
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    ART 392 - Cooperative Education in Art

    (1-6 cr) Intended to provide a bridge between the classroom and the professional world, cooperative education provides supervised work experience directly related to a student’s major subject area and career goals. Placement will be in a gallery, museum, or studio. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 9 hours (not in the same term). Usually offered every term. Prerequisites: Junior level standing with minimum overall GPA of 2.3, 2.7 in the concentration area, approval of academic department, and placement by the Career Development Center. It is recommended that the student complete an internship or practicum prior to entering a cooperative education placement. ART 390 .
  
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    ART 400 - Special Topics in Studio Art

    (3cr) This course will vary in content with each offering as areas of particular interest or timeliness not covered by the regular curriculum are explored. Offerings may focus on a specific art process or style or on a specific area of content. Each course offering under this title bears a subtitle which indicates the specific subject covered. This course may be repeated for credit when course content is changed. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and 18 hours of studio art.
  
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    ART 403 - Art Criticism

    (3 cr) An investigation of the aesthetic dimension of the visual arts is made in relation to the studio experience and the history of art, preparing the student to analyze, evaluate, and judge a work of art. Prerequisites: 22 hours of art, ART 203 , ART 310 .
  
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    ART 405 - Digital Illustration II

    (3cr) A continuation of craft and problem-solving skills associated with producing visual images for a client. Students have an opportunity to expand upon the variety of techniques and types of illustration (both traditional media and digital) while developing a personal style and approach to illustration. Previously titled Illustration II. Prerequisites: ART 255 .
  
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    ART 410 - Advanced Drawing

    (3-6 cr) This class, designed for upper-level drawing students, will focus on the developmental continuation of skills and perceptions of drawing. The course will focus on the figure and other three-dimensional subject matter as well as explore media and the perceptions of drawing as a fine art medium. Prerequisites: ART 115 , ART 215 .
  
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    ART 434 - Advanced Painting Studio

    (3cr) An upper-division course designed as a culminating experience within the concentration area of painting. An opportunity is provided for the student to pursue a specific area of painting. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ART 330 .
  
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    ART 435 - Capstone Painting

    (3cr) Offered in the fall semester of the senior year of study. Students begin a conceptually based body of work that challenges and enlarges their skills in the manipulation of paint media and materials. Students are expected to create works that will be part of the Senior Exhibit and as such should demonstrate technical and contemporary awareness at a level appropriate for a graduating senior who expects to enter graduate programs in painting or who expects to compete for grant, internship, and gallery representation after earning their BFA in painting.  To be taken during the last 36 hours before graduation. Prerequisites: ART 410 ART 434 , ART 475 .
  
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    ART 450 - Advanced 3-D Studio

    (3cr) An in-depth exploration of conceptual, process and aesthetic principles involved in making physical objects and time-based artwork. Students work under guidance to produce a body of work pertaining to a common idea or goal.  Previously titled Advanced Sculpture Studio. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ART 240 , ART 250 , ART 340 , or ART 350 .
  
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    ART 451 - Capstone Sculpture

    (3cr) Offered in the fall semester of the senior year of study. Students begin a conceptually based body of work that challenges and enlarges their skills in the manipulation of sculpural media and materials. Students are expected to create works that will be part of the Senior Exhibit and as such should demonstrate technical and contemporary awareness at a level appropriate for a graduating senior who expects to enter graduate programs in sculpture or who expects to compete for grant, internship, and gallery representation after earning their BFA degree in sculpture. To be taken during the last 36 hours before graduation. Prerequisites: ART 410 , ART 450 , ART 475 .
  
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    ART 464 - Advanced Printmaking Studio

    (3 cr) An upper-division course designed as a culminating experience within the concentration area of printmaking. The student is expected to experimentally pursue an aspect of the printmaking area on a significant level. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ART 361 .
  
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    ART 465 - Capstone Printmaking

    (3cr) Offered in the fall semester of the senior year of study. Students begin a conceptually based body of work that challenges and enlarges their skills in the manipulation of print media and materials. Students are expected to create works that will be part of the Senior Exhibit and as such should demonstrate technical and contemporary awareness at a level appropriate for a graduating senior who expects to enter graduate school in printmaking or who expects to compete for grant, internship, and gallery representation after earning their BFA degree in printmaking.  To be taken during the last 36 hours of the BFA degree. Prerequisites: ART 410 , ART 464 , ART 475 .
  
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    ART 475 - Interdisciplinary Studio

    (3 cr) This studio course explores the nature and process of contemporary art. Students are encouraged to investigate mixed media. Integration of processes is promoted. Students work together solving creative problems with a team of faculty whose expertise is broad and varied. Faculty mentors encourage boundaries to be broken, limits to be pushed, and students to explore both conceptually and technically the range of artistic opportunity. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ART 330  or ART 350  or PHOT 282  or THEA 346 .
  
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    ART 476 - Capstone Interdisciplinary Studio

    (3cr) Students continue and complete a conceptually-based body of work in their discipline that challenge and enlarge skills in the manipulation of media and materials. Special consideration is given to the appropriate method of presentation for the completed body of work and to developing the vocabulary and contemporary connections that will assist the student in clearly defining and discussing their work within the context of contemporary artistic dialogue. Prerequisites: ART 475  
  
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    ART 480 - Individualized Study

    (3-9 cr) This course allows selected senior level students to pursue a self-directed and self-motivated experience in any studio area in which the student has completed a minimum of 30 credit hours. Approval must be granted by the program coordinator in which the student desires to work and a written plan for the individualized study must be approved. It is expected that the plan involves advanced and challenging ideas reflecting a maturity necessary for individualized study. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 hours within the studio area and approval by the program coordinator.
  
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    ART 490 - Capstone

    (3 cr) Students planning to graduate in May, August, or December must enroll in Capstone during the spring semester prior to graduation. Professionals in the discipline conduct an exit review to determine preparedness of the student to compete for placement in graduate school and the professional world. Photography and studio art majors will be expected to mount a senior exhibit in addition to assembling a professional portfolio. Graphic design students will be expected to make a professional presentation, create a Web site, and assemble a professional portfolio.    Prerequisites: To be taken in the spring semester of the senior year prior to graduation.

    CORE CODE:   CP

  
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    PHOT 495 - Advanced Print Portfolio

    (3cr) This course will focus on advanced digital printing and digital print portfolio production. Students will be introduced to large-format digital printing, digital print workflow, color correction, printer maintenance, and professional print handling and archiving. Students will conclude the course with a professional print portfolio of a cohesive body of work suitable for portfolio reviews and professional presentation. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

Art (Graduate)

  
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    ART 510 - Graduate Level Interdisciplinary Studio

    (3 cr) This cross-disciplinary studio class will expect students to work in multiple disciplines in order to achieve a concept-driven body of work which is not inhibited by the arbitrary boundaries of traditional painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, or printmaking. The course encourages a contemporary approach to art making in which any medium or combination of media or processes may be combined to achieve the artistic goal established by each individual student. Prerequisites: 9-12 hours in a single studio area (painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, photography, graphic design, illustration, etc. May be repeated for up to nine hours of credit.
  
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    ART 511 - Drawing Studio

    (3 cr) The course will focus on developing rendering skills associated with drawing from life. Students will also be expected to generate a body of work outside of class worthy of contemporary art markets. These drawings may not necessarily adhere to the traditional modes and means of drawing and will anticipate a contemporary approach to subject, materials, and execution. Prerequisites: 9 hours in drawing. May be repeated for up to nine hours of credit.
  
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    ART 512 - Curators and Exhibit Proposals

    (3 cr) During a one-week field trip to New York City, students will learn about different art venues, their purposes, and curatorial responsibilities. Upon their return, students will act as independent curators and respond with their own proposals for both group and one-person exhibits for the Shepherd University Gallery in response to a mock call for entries. Prerequisites: 9 hours art history, 3 hours aesthetics, criticism, or related course
  
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    ART 513 - Computer Applications: Graphic Design Photography

    (3 cr) The continuation of developing a working relationship between graphic design and photography. Emphasis is upon developing professional projects and the integration of theory and practice.
  
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    ART 514 - Professional Practices in Art

    (3 cr) Supervised project work experience in illustration, graphic design, photography, and computer imagery. Intended to provide a bridge between the classroom and the professional world. Topic and work required to be approved by the area coordinator.
  
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    ART 599 - Special Topics: Art

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of art.
  
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    ART 699 - Special Topics: Art

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of art.

Art Education

  
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    ARED 180 - Inclusive Approaches to Art Education

    (3 cr) ARED 180 provides art education majors with an overview of practices used in teaching visual art to exceptional children. The course will examine current legislative policies and ethical issues associated with teaching special needs and special abilities students through art. In addition, this course will model teaching and classroom management strategies useful for teaching art through multicultural perspectives and to special populations.
  
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    ARED 325 - Aesthetic Inquiry

    (3 cr) The purpose of this course is to acquaint education majors with the broad range of themes and issues considered in the visual arts and in effective teaching of art in K-12 grades. Students will study the philosophy of art and the history of aesthetic arguments concerning the nature, definition, purpose, and value of art. Course content will present a variety of pedagogical strategies including, among others, methods to teach studio art, art history, art criticism, aesthetics, psychology, the interdisciplinary approach, the multicultural approach, and technology. Moreover, students will explore historic and recent trends in curriculum development and regional and national instructional standards. Students will employ critical reading, writing and discussion skills.
  
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    ARED 345 - Curriculum and Instruction in Art Education

    (4 cr) A comprehensive study of the psychology of art intended for art education majors. This course surveys methods of critical, analytical, and evaluative thinking associated with creative problem solving. Visual communication principles, social issues, group dynamics, and research methods are stressed. Prerequisites: ART 140  and ARED 180 .

Athletic Coaching

  
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    ATHC 101 - Champs Life Skills Program

    (1 cr) This course will support efforts of every student-athlete in the areas of intellectual development by using athletics as preparation for success in life, meeting the changing needs of student-athletes, and promoting respect for diversity as well as enhance interpersonal relationships. This course also will assist the athlete in developing study skills and time management.

    CORE CODES :   FY

 

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