Dec 07, 2022  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Athletic Coaching

  
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    ATHC 193 - Varsity Athletics

    (1 cr) For intercollegiate athletic team members. Athletes receive instruction in skills, techniques, and rules in an intercollegiate sport and must participate in practice sessions and athletic events. Can be taken one time only during athletic participation for one credit. (Does not count for GSPE credit.) Prerequisites: Permission of the coach/instructor.
  
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    ATHC 300 - Sports Officiating

    (3cr) This course will teach the skills necessary for officiating sports at any level. It will also focus on developing an officiating philosophy, understanding the psychology of officiating, being physically prepared to officiate, understanding the responsibilities of officiating, and knowing how and where to work as an official.
  
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    ATHC 302 - Recreation and Sport Administration

    (3cr) Policies and practices in the administration of athletic programs in academic settings.
  
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    ATHC 303 - Principles of Coaching

    (3 cr) This course examines functions, roles, and responsibilities associated with coaching from elementary through University level. Career advancement, coaching philosophy, coaching assistants, and the interview process are also studied.  (Was previously numbered ATHC 403)
  
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    ATHC 324 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

    (3cr) A theory and laboratory course that studies prevention, care, and taping of athletic injuries with emphasis on safety in sports activities and prevention of injuries through conditioning programs.
  
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    ATHC 350 - Coaching of Football

    (3 cr) For individuals who anticipate active involvement in coaching football. Emphasis is on scheme, strategy, fundamentals, position techniques, and team theory as well as an in-depth study of offense, defense, kicking game, scouting, and evaluation of personnel.
  
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    ATHC 351 - Coaching of Basketball

    (3 cr) For individuals who anticipate active involvement in coaching basketball. Emphasis is on coaching philosophy, problems, individual and team offense and defense, drills, professional attitude, and advancement.
  
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    ATHC 352 - Coaching of Baseball

    (3 cr) For individuals who anticipate active involvement in coaching baseball. Emphasis is on developing a thorough knowledge of the sport and an understanding of the rules, skills, offense and defensive strategies, and coaching techniques of the game.
  
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    ATHC 353 - Coaching of Tennis

    (3 cr) For individuals who anticipate active involvement in coaching tennis. A study of the physical, mental, and emotional areas of human development critical to growth as a tennis player. Emphasis is on teaching methods, philosophy, skills, strokes, tactics, drills, etiquette, and equipment.
  
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    ATHC 354 - Coaching of Lacrosse

    (3cr) For individuals who anticipate active involvement in coaching lacrosse.  A study of the physical, mental, and emotional areas of human development critical to growth as a lacrosse player.  Emphasis is on teaching methods, philosophy, skills, strokes, tactics, drills, etiquette, and equipment.
  
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    ATHC 355 - Coaching of Soccer

    (3cr) For individuals who anticipate active involvement in coaching soccer.  A study of the physical, mental, and emotional areas of human development critical to growth as a soccer player.  Emphasis is on teaching methods, philosophy, skills, strokes, tactics, drills, etiquette, and equipment.
  
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    ATHC 357 - Principles of Officiating Lacrosse

    (2cr) Covers the essentials of successful lacrosse officiating including communication, conflict resolution, and decision making.  Sport-specific principles teach proper mechanics, positioning, rule application and interpretation, legal responsibilities, professional dress and equipment, team-officiating concepts, and sport signals.
  
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    ATHC 360 - Principles of Officiating Football

    (2 cr) Covers the essentials of successful football officiating including communication, conflict-resolution, and decision making. Sport specific principles teach proper mechanics, positioning, rule application and interpretation, legal responsibilities, professional dress and equipment, team-officiating concepts, and sport signals. Those who successfully complete this course will receive the certification of the American Sports Education Program (ASEP) and the National Federation of High Schools (NFHS).
  
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    ATHC 361 - Principles of Officiating Basketball

    (2 cr) Covers the essentials of successful basketball officiating including communication, conflict-resolution, and decision making. Sport specific principles teach proper mechanics, positioning, rule application and interpretation, legal responsibilities, professional dress and equipment, team-officiating concepts, and sport signals. Those who successfully complete this course will receive the certification of the American Sports Education Program (ASEP) and the National Federation of High Schools (NFHS).
  
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    ATHC 362 - Principles of Officiating Softball/Baseball

    (2 cr) Covers the essentials of successful softball/baseball officiating including communication, conflict-resolution, and decision making. Sport specific principles teach proper mechanics, positioning, rule application and interpretation, legal responsibilities, professional dress and equipment, team-officiating concepts, and sport signals. Those who successfully complete this course will receive the certification of the American Sports Education Program (ASEP) and the National Federation of High Schools (NFHS).
  
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    ATHC 363 - Principles of Officiating Tennis

    (2cr) Covers the essentials of successful tennis officiating including communication, conflict resolution, and decision making.  Sport-specific pinciples teach proper mechanics, positioning, rule application and interpretation, legal responsibilities, professional dress and equipment, team officiating concepts, and sport signals.
  
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    ATHC 364 - Principles of Officiating Soccer

    (2 cr) Covers the essentials of successful soccer officiating including communication, conflict-resolution, and decision making. Sport specific principles teach proper mechanics, positioning, rule application and interpretation, legal responsibilities, professional dress and equipment, team-officiating concepts, and sport signals. Those who successfully complete this course will receive the certification of the American Sports Education Program (ASEP) and the National Federation of High Schools (NFHS).
  
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    ATHC 402 - Legal Aspects of Recreation and Sport

    (3cr) Introduction to basic ethical and legal principles required to successfully address managerial situations that arise in sport industry settings; ethical concepts and theories that provide the foundation for the rendering of comprehensive decisions, including but not limited to issues involving Title IX, the use of drugs, antitrust, labor, intellectual property, and religion.
  
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    ATHC 405 - Psychology of Coaching

    (3 cr) For students who anticipate active involvement in coaching. Emphasis is on psychological demands in athletics with special attention to personality, activation motivation, aggression, anxiety, audience, and social and group interaction.
  
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    ATHC 450 - Coaching Internship

    (3 cr) Provides practical coaching experience under a qualified head coach for an entire season. Students must serve as an assistant coach in a public junior or senior high school or collegiate athletic program (minimum of 150 hours). Specific procedures are outlined in Coaching Internship Manual. May be repeated.

Biology

  
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    BIOL 103 - General Biology

    (4 cr) Not for biology majors. With BIOL 104, satisfies Core Curriculum lab science requirement. Integrated approach to the biology of plants, animals, and microorganisms. Half of the course is centered around ecological principles, and the other half is centered around organismic homeostatic (regulatory) principles. Laboratory topics and sequence are integrated with lecture. Previously BIOL 101-General Biological Science.

    CORE CODES  :  LS

  
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    BIOL 104 - General Biology

    (4 cr) Not for biology majors. With BIOL 103, satisfies Core Curriculum lab science requirement. Integrated approach to the biology of plants, animals, and microorganisms. Half of the course is centered around reproductive principles bearing on evolution, and the other half is centered around cell physiology. Laboratory topics and sequence are integrated with lecture. Previously BIOL 102-General Biological Science.

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
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    BIOL 150 - Biology First Year Experience

    (1cr) This course is intended to integrate students into the life and culture of Shepherd University (as do all FYEX courses) and to the Biology department, and to prepare them with the foundations for academic success in science.  Activities and topics covered include familiarity with faculty and research conducted in the Biology department, the foundations of success in science (literature searches, writing effective laboratory reports, and scientific calculations), career options in Biology, and healthy living for a successful university experience.
  
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    BIOL 211 - Fundamentals of Biology I: Molecular and Cellular Function

    (4cr) This introductory course for science majors covers the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology and cell biology that apply to all living organisms. Topics addressed in this course include metabolism, cell and membrane function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell cycle, meiosis, classical and molecular genetics, and evolution.

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
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    BIOL 212 - Fundamentals of Biology II: Diversity of Life

    (4cr) This introductory course for science majors explores the diversity of life and organismal biology. Topics addressed in this course include microbial diversity and physiology; plant and animal diversity, growth, reproduction and physiology; and ecology. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 .

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
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    BIOL 225 - Human Anatomy and Physiology

    (3 cr) Semester one of a two-course sequence that provides a detailed review of the human organism. In a lecture format, this course provides an overview of the human body and the chemical basis for activities occurring within the body and a detailed review of the cell and tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems as well as an overview of the human senses. Students taking this course should possess a high school level understanding of biology and chemistry.

     

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
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    BIOL 226 - Human Anatomy and Physiology

    (3 cr) Semester two of a two-course sequence that provides a detailed review of the human organism. In a lecture format, this course provides a detailed review of cardiovascular, lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Students taking this course should possess a high school level understanding of biology and chemistry.

     

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
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    BIOL 227 - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab

    (1 cr) A laboratory course in human anatomy and physiology to be taken concurrently with or following BIOL 225 .

     

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
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    BIOL 228 - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab

    (1 cr) A laboratory course in human anatomy and physiology to be taken concurrently with or following BIOL 226 .

     

    CORE CODES :  LS

  
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    BIOL 301 - Evolution

    (4 cr) Evolution processes underpin all biological phenomena and thus represent fundamental and synthetic ideas in all fields. Understanding evolution and how it impacts everything from our health to biotechnology is essential to all scholars. Lecture topics include patterns of macroevolution; mechanisms of microevolution; the nature of adaptation; units and levels of selection; how we measure natural selection; limits to selection; quantitative genetics; the evolution of behavior; and applications of evolution to conservation and medicine. In the laboratory, we will interpret the outcomes of evolution through computation and analysis of phylogenies, genomes, and population genetic structure. Previously offered as 3 credit, with separate lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 , or BIOL 103 and 104.
  
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    BIOL 302 - Microbiology

    (4 cr) Part of the required curriculum in nursing and medical technology and a recommended elective for any biology student. The course will emphasize the impact of microbial activity on human health and disease, including the conditions contributing to microbial increase, spread and virulence, conditions contributing to the body responses leading to resistance and immunity, and methods of interceding in the usual etiology for the purpose of bringing about informed control. The non-medical aspects of microbiology also will be considered, in regard to the basic activities in interacting biological systems, as symbionts, as critical energy conversion agencies, as agents for driving biogeochemical cycles, and as experimental subjects for the discovery of basic biological principles such as intermediary metabolism and the genetic code. Prerequisites:  BIOL 211 ; OR CHEM 125  AND CHEM 125L ; OR permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 303 - General Ecology

    (4 cr) This course is designed to be an introduction into ecological topics spanning population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization. Students will gain an understanding of population growth, community interactions, and energy flow, within the overarching framework of the biotic and abiotic factors that regulate species’ distributions, behavior, and evolution.  All topics will be discussed in the context of the relationship between humans and the natural environment.  Previously numbered BIOL 420. Prerequisites: BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 ; or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 305 - Cell Biology

    (4 cr) Cells are considered as the basic structural and functional unit of biological organization. Selected cell structures and activities are discussed from the molecular, cytological, ultrastructural, and metabolic points of view. Topics include bioenergetics, macromolecular structure, transport processes, regulation of cellular activities, and internal organization of cells. Prerequisites: BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 ; AND CHEM 207 , CHEM 207L , CHEM 209 , CHEM 209L .
  
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    BIOL 313 - Invertebrate Natural History

    (4 cr) A field-oriented study emphasizing living organisms in their natural habitats, their life cycles, and interaction with humans, other organisms, and the physical environment. Collection, culture, and identification of the major orders of the parasitic and free living freshwater and temperate terrestrial invertebrate phyla. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 , BIOL 212 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 315 - Advanced Plant Biology

    (4 cr) An expansion of the Plants as Organisms topics. This course examines the structural features of the major plant groups with special reference to comparative life cycle mechanisms. There will be laboratory opportunities to investigate nutritional physiology, hormone regulation, and photophysiology in various culture samples, including plant tissue cultures.
  
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    BIOL 324 - Plant Taxonomy I Fall Flora

    (2 cr) First eight weeks of first semester. Field work in the identification of grasses, fall flowers, and woody plants. Designed to illustrate the principles of nomenclature and descriptive morphology. Prerequisites: BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 325 - Plant Taxonomy II Spring Flora

    (1 cr) Second eight weeks of second semester. Field work in the identification of ferns and spring flowering plants. Designed to illustrate the principles and applications of scientific nomenclature and descriptive morphology. Prerequisites: BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOL 332 - Comparative Anatomy

    (4 cr) A comparative study of organs and systems of representative forms of chordates keeping in mind the evolutionary development and relationships of these forms. Concepts of embryology are applied to an understanding of the adult organism. Laboratory work is concerned with a detailed dissection and comparative study of the amphioxus, necturus, dogfish, and cat. Prerequisites: BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 ; or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 344 - Genetics

    (4 cr) Mechanisms of inheritance, the nature of genes, and genetic systems are examined in relation to the capacities of living systems for continuity, self-regulation, and adaptive change. Molecular, cellular, and organismal reproduction are considered as processes of information storage, transfer, and generation. The development of the gene concept is traced from its origin as a mathematical abstraction, through progressive definition as a unit of nuclear structure and function, to final characterization as nucleic acid. Prerequisites: BIOL 305 .
  
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    BIOL 350 - Special Topics for Non-Majors

    (1-3 cr) Elective in biology intended to stimulate an interest in nature or in areas of biology having public interest or political significance. Bird life, local flora, economic botany, psychopharmacology, and biological energy resources are representative topics. Persons interested in a specific topic should contact the department chair. Permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 363 - Mycology

    (4cr) This upper-level lecture and laboratory course will provide a broad introduction to the Kingdom Fungi. Fungi decay organic matter and recycle nutrients. The growth of vascular plants is enhanced by symbiotic fungi (mycorrhizae). Many important antibiotics and other compounds are produced by fungi. Fungi cause diseases of plants, animals, and humans; some of these diseases have had profound effects on the course of human history. In addition to the general biology and taxonomy of fungi, this course will address the roles of fungi in ecology, industry, medicine, research, agriculture, and food production. Prerequisites: BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 ; or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 383 - Ornithology

    (4cr) Ornithology is an abstract subject that draws upon many diverse areas of scientific knowledge. The biology of birds, including evolution, functional morphology, physiology, ecology and behavior will be covered. Field and museum laboratories emphasize identification and taxonomy of avifauna within the context of natural history and ecology. This course stresses contextual problem solving, not only rote memorization. Prerequisites: BIOL 103  and BIOL 104 ; or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 ; or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 404 - Immunology

    (4 cr) A senior-level lecture and laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the study of immunological processes and the methods used to initiate, describe, differentiate, and measure such processes. Attention is given to the biological basis of immunity, the nature of the humoral and cell mediated immune responses, the chemical and biological features of immunoglobulins, in vivo and in vitro antigen antibody interactions, and immunologic diseases. Prerequisites: BIOL 344 , CHEM 315 , CHEM 315L ,  , CHEM 316L , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 406 - Developmental Biology

    (4 cr) Concentrates upon mechanisms and principles involved in cellular differentiation and integration that accompany development of organisms from single cells into complex, multicellular structures. Beginning with relatively simple organisms and progressing to more complex examples of higher plant and animal developmental processes, the student is exposed to both descriptive information and experimental investigative techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL 344 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 407 - Genomics and Bioinformatics

    (4cr) Lectures will introduce some of the common techniques and algorithms used in genomic analysis, including sequence alignment, BLAST, gene expression profiling, and prediction of protein structure and gene function. Throughout the course, we will explore how these techniques, and genomic data in general, have been used to explore topics such as evolutionary history, genetic causes of disease, cancer biology, and ecology (metagenomics). Since genomics is a new and rapidly changing field, we will emphasize topics chosen from recent literature, discussing both the scientific and cultural implications of the work.

    The computational lab is an essential component of this course. There is no assumption of previous experience beyond knowing how to move files around and use the web, word processors and spreadsheets. In the first set of labs, students will become comfortable with online databases, sequence alignment, gene expression analysis, and genome-scale data. Prerequisites: BIOL 301  or BIOL 344 , or permission of instructor.

  
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    BIOL 411 - Animal Behavior

    (4 cr) An evolutionary approach to behavioral strategies emphasizing ecological and physiological mechanisms of behavior. Topics include hereditary and environmental influences, neural control, behavioral choices, and the evolution of social behavior. Prerequisite/corequisite: BIOL 303 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 412 - Comparative Animal Physiology

    (4 cr) A comparative approach to the functional adaptations of animals to diverse environments with emphasis on underlaying physiological and biochemical mechanisms. Relevant physiological functions include gas exchange, circulation, digestion, excretion, osmoregulation, metabolism, muscle contraction, as well as neural and endocrine coordinating mechanisms. Prerequisites: BIOL 305  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 413 - Seminar in Biology

    (1 cr each) Recommended for juniors and seniors pursuing at least a minor program in biology. This course emphasizes library research and oral presentation of subjects of interest and importance in the various fields of biology. Permission of biology staff.
  
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    BIOL 414 - Seminar in Biology

    (1 cr each) Recommended for juniors and seniors pursuing at least a minor program in biology. This course emphasizes library research and oral presentation of subjects of interest and importance in the various fields of biology. Permission of biology staff.
  
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    BIOL 415 - Biological Research

    (1-6 cr) This course awards academic credit for Department of Biology-approved research supervised on campus in a field, laboratory, or other professional setting which enables a student to gain practical knowledge in pure or applied science. A student wishing to enroll in this course must submit a written proposal (following department guidelines that can be obtained from the chair of the Department of Biology) to the chair of the Department of Biology or his/her appointed representative before the 12th week of the semester preceding the research project. All proposals must be approved by a majority of the faculty members of the Department of Biology. Students may apply up to 4 credit hours to meet the elective requirements of a biology major. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair.
  
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    BIOL 416 - Molecular Biology

    (4 cr) An advanced level course on techniques and theory of modern genetics and biotechnology. The course is designed to expose students to modern biochemical genetics, gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and mechanisms for the rearrangement and exchange of genetic material. Prerequisites: BIOL 344 .
  
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    BIOL 418 - Virology

    (4 cr) A senior-level lecture and laboratory course in which the nature of viruses and their interactions with prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and organisms are presented. The emphasis is on animal viruses but bacterial and plant viruses will be covered. The first section of the course treats viral structure, viral replication, and viral effects at the cellular and organismic level. The second section discusses viral virulence, the disease states produced by animal viruses in their hosts, antiviral therapies, mechanisms of viral immunity, and viral epidemiology. Laboratory exercises will be sequenced with lectures and include development of animal cell cultures, demonstration of viral cytopathic effect, determination of viral titer, viral neutralization assays, immunological detection of virus, and analysis of viral structural components. Laboratory exercises will employ bacterial, insect, plant, and animal cells as viral hosts. Prerequisites: BIOL 344 , CHEM 315 ,  , CHEM 316 , CHEM 316L , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 422 - Neurobiology

    (4cr) Basic and integrative processes of nervous systems are considered with attention to their roles in species-typical behaviors. Initial consideration of cellular properties of individual nerve cells, cell interactions and neuroanatomy forms the basis for studying systems of neurons and their behavioral significance during the remainder of the semester. The focus is on the neuronal basis of naturalistic behaviors in animals, including humans. Topics include sensory systems, central processing of information, and production and control of patterned behavior. Prerequisites: BIOL 305 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 425 - Principles and Practice of Research

    (4cr) An upper-level course taken by junior or senior students after completion of introductory courses in biology, chemistry, and mathematics. Statistics is recommended prior to the course. Lectures will address logic and the scientific process. The scientific approach to problem solving will be emphasized. Topics included are literature review, experimental design, data analysis, scientific communication, and research ethics. In this course, students will write a research-based thesis and present an oral seminar. This course is required for both the biology major and the ecological sciences concentration. This course meets the Core Curriculum Capstone and Writing in the Major requirements. Previously titled Internship in Biology. Prerequisites: Junior standing and Biology major, or permission of instructor.

     :   CP   WM

  
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    BIOL 450 - Special Topics in Advanced Biology

    (1-4 cr) Elective for students who have had upper-division biology courses. Intended to diversify or specialize a student’s training beyond the regular curriculum, taking advantage of a local person’s particular interest or skill, or of a faculty member’s interest or skill. The course will be pursued in a less formal but no less intensive fashion than the regular courses. Interested students should present specific proposals to the department chair.

Biology (Graduate)

  
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    BIOL 501 - Evolution

    (3cr) Evolution processes underpin all biological phenomena and thus represent fundamental and synthetic ideas in all fields. Understanding evolution and how it impacts everything from our health to biotechnology is essential to all scholars. Lecture topics include patterns of macroevolution; mechanisms of microevolution; the nature of adaptation; units and levels of selection; how we measure natural selection; limits to selection; quantitative genetics; the evolution of behavior; and applications of evolution to conservation and medicine. In the laboratory, we will interpret the outcomes of evolution through computation and analysis of phylogeneies, genomes, and population genetic structure. Students will be expected to complete an independent research project chosen with guidance from the instructor.
  
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    BIOL 507 - Genomics and Bioinformatics

    (3cr) Lectures will introduce some of the common techniques and algorithms used in genomic analysis, including sequence alignment, BLAST, gene expression profiling, and prediction of protein structure and gene function. Throughout the course, we will explore how these techniques, and genomic data in general, have been used to explore topics such as evolutionary history, genetic causes of disease, cancer biology, and ecology (metagenomics). Since genomics is a new and rapidly changing field, we will emphasize topics chosen from recent literature, discussing both the scientific and cultural implications of the work.

    The computational lab is an essential component of this course. There is no assumption of previous experience beyond knowing how to move files around and use the web, word processors, and spreadsheets. In the first set of labs, students will become comfortable with online databases, sequence alignment, gene expression analysis, and genome-scale data. Students will be expected to complete an independent research project chosen with guidance from the instructor.

  
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    BIOL 599 - Special Topics: Biology

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of biology.
  
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    BIOL 699 - Special Topics: Biology

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of biology.

Business Administration

  
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    BADM 150 - Introduction to Business

    (3 cr) A survey designed to introduce business terminology, principles, and current issues. The functions of business will be explored including management, marketing, accounting and financial management, entrepreneurship, and the ethical and legal aspects of business. Electronic tools (MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint) to assist in developing a business plan will be introduced. This course may be used as an elective in the Business Administration major.
  
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    BADM 211 - Creativity and Problem Solving

    (3cr) This class will introduce students to the conceptual models (scripts, templates, etc.) used in understanding how we think and therefore how to stimulate thinking. Students will be asked to apply tools and techniques both individually and in groups. Tools and techniques will be applied to problems in a problem based learning environment.
  
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    BADM 212 - Introduction to Innovation

    (3cr) This course addresses selected challenges and opportunities related to managing technology and innovation including but not limited to teamwork, group problem solving, technology transfer, design life cycles, and potential organizational challenges in promoting innovation.
  
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    BADM 224 - Business Statistics

    (3 cr) Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics; statistical methods include organizing data, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, basic probability concepts, probability distributions with emphasis on the normal distribution, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Students may not receive credit for both this course and MATH 314. Prerequisites: MATH 105 , MATH 108 , MATH 154 , MATH 155 , MATH 205 , or MATH 207 .
  
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    BADM 280 - Business and Society

    (3 cr) Examination of ethical and global issues; the influence of political, social, legal, regulatory, environmental, and technical issues in business; consideration of the impact of current social and political issues on business organizations.
  
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    BADM 309 - Fundamentals of Risk Management

    (3cr) Focuses on the concepts of risk management and the role of planning for insurance needs; covers basic concepts in risk management and insurance, insurance industry operations, legal principles pertaining to this industry, and regulation of insurers. Examines social insurance, life insurance and annuities, medical and disability income insurance, long-term care insurance and personal property and liability insurance.
  
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    BADM 310 - Principles of Management

    (3 cr) Foundations of the study of management; introduces the major functions of management (planning, organizing, leading, and controlling); examines the management process from a managerial perspective, focusing on the skills, competencies, techniques and knowledge needed to successfully manage an organization; explores concepts and analyses of the behavioral aspects of organizations, expansion of integrative and human skills to form a strategic vision, setting objectives, crafting a strategy and then implementing it.
  
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    BADM 311 - Exploring Entrepreneurship

    (3cr) Exploration of opportunities, issues, decisions, and challenges faced by entrepreneurs in creating and managing microenterprises, small businesses, technology-based ventures, and other entrepreneurial endeavors; emphasis on the major elements of the entrepreneurial experience. Previously titled Small Business Management.
  
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    BADM 312 - Business Law I

    (3 cr) A survey of legal principles relevant to the operation and management of business organizations including contracts, employment law, torts, consumer protection, business organizations, credit, and bankruptcy. Prerequisites: ACCT 201  or RECR 201 , and ECON 123  or ECON 205 .
  
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    BADM 313 - Business Law II

    (3 cr) A detailed study of regulatory and commercial law including secured transactions, ethics, insurance, negotiable instruments, estates, and employment regulation; detailed discussion of The Uniform Commercial Code. Recommended for students who plan to take the CPA examination. Prerequisites: BADM 312 .
  
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    BADM 315 - Quantitative Methods

    (3 cr) Continuation of BADM 224 . Study of two sample inferences, analysis of variance, multiple regression and correlation, chi-square tests, nonparametric methods, time series forecasting and statistical process control; proficiency in using standard statistical software for data analysis developed.  Previously numbered BADM 413. Prerequisites: 3 hours of college level statistics.
  
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    BADM 319 - Business Ethics

    (3 cr) Analysis and examination of significant contemporary ethical issues and challenges existing throughout the professional business arena; emphasis on managers’ social and environmental responsibilities to a wide variety of stakeholders; exploration of ethical dilemmas and decision-making frameworks.
  
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    BADM 320 - Employment Law

    (3 cr) Detailed study of employment law from the inception of the Sherman Act of 1890 through more definitive legislation such as the Wagner Act, Civil Rights Act, EEO Act, and Americans With Disabilities Act; analysis of case studies reflecting current employment case law practices and trends; examination of public policy as the heart of employment law. Prerequisites: BADM 312 .
  
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    BADM 323 - Human Resources and Business Ethics

    (3cr) Strategic issues in managing human resources including shared responsibilities of line managers and human resources staff for developing, implementing, and applying human resources policies and procedures; collective bargaining; human resources planning; job design, analysis and evaluation; staffing; compensation; performance appraisal; ethical behavior; whistle blowing; social responsibility; and training and development. Previously titled Human Resource Management (before Fall 2015), then Human Resources Management (beginning Fall 2015).
  
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    BADM 324 - Negotiations and Collective Bargaining

    (3cr) Examination of the history of labor movements and social problems arising from relations between labor and management; study of the collective bargaining process and survey of management and union rights in collective bargaining; includes case studies and readings in management and union philosophy.  Previously titled Labor Problems/Collective Bargaining. Prerequisites: BADM 310  and BADM 312 .
  
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    BADM 327 - Retirement and Employee Benefits

    (3 cr) Major elements of a multitude of topics in retirement and employee benefits such as qualified plans, SEPs, SIMPLEs and 403(b) plans and nonqualified deferred compensation plans, individual retirement planning including IRAs and Roth IRAs, Social Security benefits, saving for retirement and planning for retirement plan distributions; emphasizes the practical knowledge required for choosing the best retirement plan, including benefits provided to employees and significant planning opportunities for tax deferral and capital accumulation, and designing a plan that will meet a client’s needs.  Previously numbered BADM 427. Prerequisites: FINC 300  or FINC 308 .
  
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    BADM 329 - Estate Planning

    (3 cr) Topics include the various aspects of estate and gift tax planning, including the nature, valuation, transfer, administration and taxation of property; provides a basic understanding of the estate and gift tax system, including strategies of estate planning; discusses gratuitous transfers of property outright or with trusts, wills and powers of appointment; use of the marital deduction; valuation of assets; and buy-sell agreements; examines the client interview, fact-finding, ethical standards, and development of personal estate plans. Previously numbered BADM 429.
  
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    BADM 338 - Business Information Systems

    (3 cr) Introduction to the use of computers in data and document management and as a problem-solving tool for business; fundamental concepts of information technology and theory; opportunities to use existing application software to solve various business information systems oriented problems.
  
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    BADM 340 - Principles of Marketing

    (3cr) Exploration of the activities and managerial decisions involved in the provision of products and/or services to customers; includes strategic marketing fundamentals, buyer behavior, market segmentation, managerial issues related to the marketing mix decision variables, and social and ethical issues.  Previously titled Marketing.
  
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    BADM 345 - Business Communications

    (3 cr) Examines proper business communications techniques; develops the application of these techniques for business-specific communications including memos and letters, reports, presentations, job search documents; instruction in listening, interviewing, and interpersonal and oral communications. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 .
  
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    BADM 350 - Retailing

    (3 cr) Survey of the concepts, policies, theories, and practices for managing a retail firm in a competitive environment; topics include functions of retailers, retail customers, supply chain, legal and ethical behavior, location analysis, pricing, promotion, customer services, and layout; discussion of retail strategies such as channels of distribution, private labels, visual presentation, and marketing mix that influence a retail business model.
  
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    BADM 359 - International Business

    (3 cr) Selected themes in global business from the perspective of marketing including cultural considerations, implementation of strategies, and management concerns including developing business alliances, theories of firm boundaries, markets for technology and the changing division of innovative labor in industry value chains, and hiring and training of foreign staff; exploration of challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross-border activity that spans multiple stages of the value chain. Prerequisites: ECON 205 .
  
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    BADM 360 - Marketing of Services

    (3 cr) Introduces services marketing as a separate and distinct area of marketing thought and practice; focus on problems and strategies specific to marketing intangibles; emphasis on service universals rather than on any particular industry; study of the powerful influence in competitive markets focusing on three main services marketing areas (the service customer, the service company, and the integration of marketing) as well as human resources and operations within the service system.
  
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    BADM 365 - Promotional Strategy

    (3 cr) Exploration of promotion as a tool for making decisions; including advertising, personal selling, public relations and publicity, alternative media, event planning and sales promotion; techniques in enhancing creativity, critical thinking, and communication skills. Prerequisites: BADM 340 .
  
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    BADM 366 - Professional Selling

    (3 cr) Examines the qualities and skills required to become a sales professional and the applied sales management tools that are used to manage a revenue generation team; considers general principles of personal selling in both consumer and industrial markets plus specialty selling. Previously BADM 406-Professional Selling and Applied Business. Prerequisites: BADM 340 .
  
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    BADM 369 - Applied Business Lectures

    (3cr) The Applied Business Lecture Series is designed to bring real world discussion into the Shepherd University business classroom. The class achieves this goal by coordinating and facilitating lectures, discussions, and activities from business professionals in an academic format. Students are encouraged to participate and engage with a variety of professionals on a variety of business topics.
  
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    BADM 370 - Entrepreneurial Organization and Financing

    (3 cr) Examines the life cycle of an entrepreneurial organization and the roles of finance and financing throughout the cycle; topics include the entrepreneurial process, business entities and forms, buying and valuing a business, financial statements and analysis of performance, personal finances and entrepreneurship, funding sources, and business plan development. Prerequisites: BADM 311 .
  
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    BADM 385 - Business Externship

    (1-6 cr) Application of theoretical concepts to practical experience in business. Minimum of 50 hours of work experience for each credit is required. May be repeated for credit. . Usually offered every session. Prerequisites: Approval of academic advisor and chair.
  
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    BADM 390 - Applied QuickBooks

    (3cr) A comprehensive review of QuickBooks Desktop software. Students are required to utilize, synthesize, and troubleshoot different small business related accounting tasks within the software. The textbook used for this course is certified as approved courseware for use by those working towards completing the QuickBooks Certified User exam. Prerequisites: ACCT 202 .
  
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    BADM 392 - Cooperative Education in Business

    (1-9 cr) May be repeated for credit, but not in the same term; topic must be different. May be repeated for credit. Usually offered every term. Prerequisites: Must have junior level standing with minimum 2.5 overall and 2.75 major GPA, approval of academic department, and placement by the Career Center.
  
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    BADM 395 - Consumer Behavior

    (3 cr) Application of behavioral science designed to provide in-depth knowledge of the fundamental theories and concepts of consumer behavior, with an emphasis on consumers in the marketplace as individuals, as decision makers, and as influenced by culture; analysis influence of psychological, sociological, and cultural factors on the behavior of consumers and industrial buyers. Prerequisites: BADM 340 .
  
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    BADM 396 - Marketing Research

    (3 cr) Nature and uses of marketing research in business; methods of collecting, analyzing and interpreting data for business decisions, with specific application to problems in marketing; development of research questions, setting research objectives, and implementing research. Previously numbered BADM 405. Prerequisites: BADM 340  and BADM 224 .
  
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    BADM 400 - Innovation Integration

    (3cr) In this course the student will demonstrate how the tools and techniques developed in the minor can be applied to their major area of study. The student will document the use of the innovation tools and techniques in a course or capstone project, independent study, internship, or competition. Prerequisites: BADM 211  and BADM 212 .
  
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    BADM 407 - Business Strategy and Policy

    (3 cr) Capstone and writing intensive course for all business administration majors; integrating experience in the basic disciples of business through active engagement; study of the development of company policy and strategy; impact of a company’s internal and external environment on strategic decisions; case practice in analyzing and formulating business policy and strategy; cuts across the whole spectrum of business and management; attention on the total enterprise, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success. Prerequisites: Final semester seniors only.

     

    CORE CODES:   WM   CP

  
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    BADM 411 - New Venture Creation

    (3cr) Comprehensive exploration of the various tools, documents, and subject materials utilized to start and grow a venture; includes the entrepreneurial perspective, opportunity identification, business model creation, customer discovery, customer generation, market and industry analysis, integrate marketing, feasibility analysis, organizational design and staffing, operational requirements, developing the business/marketing/financial organizational plans, and financing the new venture.  Previously titled Entrepreneurship and New Venture Formation. Prerequisites: BADM 311  and BADM 370 .
  
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    BADM 412 - Strategic Marketing

    (3cr) Culminating study of the design of marketing strategy and its implementation in marketing plans; provides a solid analytical framework to develop strategic thinking, create a sophisticated awareness of the cutting edge developments in the field, and provide the experience of applying these concepts; considers the elements of marketing analysis that are at the core of making strategic marketing decisions: customer analysis, competitor analysis, and company analysis. Includes the creation of a marketing plan.  Previously numbered BADM 375. Prerequisites: BADM 340  and permission of instructor.
  
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    BADM 415 - Operations and Production Management

    (3 cr) Analysis of operational problems and opportunities in service and manufacturing sectors, site location, facilities design, forecasting, work methods and measurement, inventory management, and operations decision making. Prerequisites: BADM 310 .
  
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    BADM 431 - Financial Plan Development

    (3cr) This course integrates and applies students’ knowledge and skill sets in all six personal financial planning areas such as Fundamentals of Financial Planning, Risk Management, Investments, Income Tax, Retirement Planning, and Estate Planning to a comprehensive financial plan application; development of a financial plan with recommendations including alternative solutions to achieve client goals based on the case study data, client profile and financial information. Prerequisites: BADM 309 , BADM 327 , FINC 308 , and FINC 425 . Prerequisite/corequisite: ACCT 335  and BADM 329 .
  
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    BADM 432 - Introduction to Project Management

    (3cr) This course presents the principles and techniques of identifying, selecting, planning, implementing, and closing any type of project. Students will develop the strategic and tactical analytical skills and awareness necessary to create useful, efficient, and effective project plans as well as the leadership skills to build and sustain high performing teams. Topics include strategic alignment, project selection, project initiation, planning, estimating, budgeting, developing work plans, scheduling, tracking work, design coordination, construction coordination, quality management, implementation, close-out and leading teams. Prerequisites: BADM 224  and BADM 310 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BADM 450 - Business Analytics

    (3cr) Business decisions require the basic skills of analyzing data to understand the problem more completely and to produce better answers. The business environment uses problem solving tools and techniques to accomplish this analysis. This course is designed to introduce students to those tools and techniques and how they can be automated. Prerequisites: BADM 224  or permission of instructor.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 100 - Chemical Science

    (3 cr) This course is designed primarily for future elementary school teachers. It introduces the student to the basic concepts of chemistry including atoms, radioactivity, bonding, chemical equations, solutions, acids and bases, and some aspects of organic and biochemistry. The latter part of the course is devoted to the study of chemical science as it applies to the elementary school: mini lectures, demonstrations, experiments, games, textbook and journal reviews are presented by the students. Circumstances permitting, the course ends with practice teaching at an elementary school Computers are used as aids to instruction and as laboratory tools. The course   must be taken concurrently with this course.
 

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