Oct 06, 2022  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Data Analytics

  
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    DATA 418 - Big Data Analytics

    (3cr) This course introduces students to concepts, methods and tools used in the analysis and management of massive data sets. Topics will include the map-reduce programming paradigm, cluster analysis, algorithms and libraries for working with large graphs, disk-based and memory-based distributed computing, stream processing, large-scale machine learning, and analysis of distributed algorithms. The course will explore the historical context, current relevance, and future growth of data analytics. Prerequisites: One from CIS 301 , CIS 324 , or CIS 388 ; AND one from MATH 318 , MATH 329 , or MATH 354 .

Data Analytics (Graduate)

  
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    DATA 509 - Statistical Analysis

    (3cr) This course covers basic statistical skills for advanced work in the functional areas of data science and analytics, including descriptive statistics, probability and its distributions, sampling, and estimation. Topics in non-parametric statistics will also be addressed.
  
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    DATA 510 - Mathematical Modeling

    (3cr) This course is a study of how to model the world around us using mathematics, how to solve the resulting equations, and how to apply the results. It provides a thorough study of how to use both quantitative and qualitative solution behavior in the modeling process. Students will be expected to complete an independent research project chosen with guidance from the instructor.
  
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    DATA 512 - Operations Research

    (3cr) This course provides an introduction to main topics of operations research: linear programming, network optimization, dynamic programming, and queueing theory. Examples of applications from industry, notably some queueing algorithms, are examined. Additional topics may be chosen from Markov chains, integer programming, nonlinear programming, game theory and decision analysis, and simulation. Students will be expected to complete an independent research project chosen with guidance from the instructor.
  
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    DATA 513 - Machine Learning in Data Mining

    (3cr) This course focuses on the principles of machine learning in a data analytics setting. Topics include historical and current approaches such as regression methods, decision trees, and neural networks, along with discussion of where machine learning is headed. Students will investigate these approaches in the context of a variety of real-world applications, and will be expected to complete an independent research project chosen with instructor guidance.
  
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    DATA 518 - Big Data Analytics

    (3cr) This course introduces students to concepts, methods and tools used in the analysis and management of massive data sets. Topics will include the map-reduce programming paradigm, cluster analysis, algorithms and libraries for working with large graphs, disk-based and memory-based distributed computing, stream processing, large-scale machine learning, and analysis of distributed algorithms. The course will explore the historical context, current relevance, and future growth of data analytics. Students will be expected to complete an independent research project chosen with guidance from the instructor.
  
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    DATA 590 - Applied Research Project and Capstone

    (3-6cr) The student will identify a problem of interest in the area of data science, data analytics or information systems, analyze the problem as completely as possible, offer the best alternative(s) for solution, and describe the problem and the proposed solution(s) in a case-study format. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    DATA 591 - Internship

    (3-6cr) The internship course provides students with the opportunity to apply the cumulative knowledge and skills in the Data Analytics and Information Systems program to a real-world work environment. The internship involves the following steps: 1) selecting a work site; 2) developing a contract that ensures both employer and student benefit; 3) fulfilling the contract activity through ongoing work; 4) preparing a paper that summarizes the learning experience and outcomes; and 5) presenting the result to the committee. The regular expectation is for a minimum of 150 hours completed in this internship for 3 credits, and 300 hours for 6 credits, upon approval by the committee. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    DATA 599 - Special Topics in Data Analysis

    (1-3cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in data analytics. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits, with different topics.

Driver Education

  
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    DRED 101 - Driver Education

    (3cr) Introduce you to driving and the responsibilities. This course places emphasis on Traffic Safety Education. You will learn how driver education and driver’s licensing programs can help you become a responsible, low-risk driver.
  
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    DRED 400 - In-Class Instruction in Driver Education

    (3cr) This course is intended to acquaint the preservice teacher with content knowledge, technology, and training needed to teach the in-classroom phase of Driver Education. It includes the use of media presentations, peer teaching, and classroom test construction. It also includes procurement procedures and research related to ancillary media.
  
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    DRED 401 - In-Car Instruction in Driver Education

    (3cr) This course will prepare the preservice driver education teacher with content knowledge and practical experience in the in-car teaching phase of driver education. It includes actual in-car instruction, driving range design, assessment, and training in the use of multiple car range operation.

Economics

  
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    ECON 123 - Contemporary Economics

    (3 cr) Introductory survey of modern economic issues. Economic theory is employed in the analysis of inflation, unemployment, pollution, regulation, market structure, and related topics. Economic institutions such as corporations, banking, and government are also studied. Students cannot receive credit for ECON 123 after completing ECON 205  and ECON 206 .

     :   SO   CK     GL

  
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    ECON 205 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    (3 cr) Introduction to fundamental economic concepts including production possibilities and economic growth, market supply and demand analysis, money, banking, and government fiscal and monetary policies. Emphasis is placed upon fluctuations in national income, employment, and the price level. Prerequisites: Qualifying Mathematics placement scores of ACT 19 or SAT 460 (old exam) or 500 (new exam); or MATH 101 or higher.

    CORE CODES :  SO    CK    GL

  
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    ECON 206 - Principles of Microeconomics

    (3 cr) Continuation of ECON 205 . Topics include extension of supply and demand analysis, production costs and revenue analysis of firms under perfect and imperfect competition, resource markets, and international trade and finance. Selected economic problems. Prerequisites: ECON 205 .

     

    CORE CODES :     SO   CK   GL

  
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    ECON 292 - Internship in Economics

    (1-6 cr) Practical experience in local, regional, and Washington Gateway organizations such as government offices, social actions groups, and private corporations/companies. Interns learn how to translate classroom theory and methods into professional skills and opportunities. May be repeated. Usually offered every term. Prerequisites: Must have sophomore class standing with minimum 2.5 overall GPA, approval of academic department, and placement by Career Center.
  
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    ECON 301 - Intermediate Microeconomics

    (3 cr) An intermediate-level study of the behavior of consumers, firms, and resource owners. Input and output markets under perfect and imperfect competition. General equilibrium analysis and welfare economics. Prerequisites: ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 302 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

    (3 cr) An examination of classical, Keynesian, and monetarist theories and their application for determining the level of and changes in national income, aggregate employment, and the average price level. Prerequisites: ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 303 - Managerial Economics

    (3 cr) The application of economic tools and techniques to management decision-making. Topics include demand, cost, and profit analysis; price and output decisions; budgeting and benefit/cost analysis; and the impact of government regulation. Case studies. Prerequisites: ECON 206  and BADM 224 .
  
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    ECON 304 - History of Economic Thought

    (3 cr) A study of the development of economic thought from mercantilism to the present day. Contributions of great economists to economic analysis and their bearing on current theory and policy issues are emphasized. Prerequisites: ECON 206  or ECON 123 .
  
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    ECON 305 - Money and Banking

    (3 cr) Within a theoretical structure, an examination concerning the changing nature and dynamics of money and credit structures of American depository institutions, including their regulatory bodies. Application to monetary policies and their implications for stabilization and growth objectives. Prerequisites: ECON 206  or ECON 123 .
  
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    ECON 310 - Public Finance

    (3 cr) A study of government expenditures, sources and methods of taxation, economic effects of expenditures and taxes, and government debt policies. Prerequisites: ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 320 - Urban Economics

    (3 cr) An examination of the interactions between the spatial environment and economic activity. Focus is placed on the spatial location of economic activity, the pattern of land use within an area, and urban problems. Prerequisites: ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 325 - International Finance

    (3 cr) Basic theories, problems, and policies of international finance, such as the international currency system, national income determination in an open economy, exchange rates theory, and balance of payments. Prerequisites: ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 326 - International Trade

    (3 cr) The study of basic theories, problems, and policies of international trade, such as comparative advantage, tariff and non-tariff, “protectionism,” barriers to trade, and factor mobility. Prerequisites: ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 330 - Economics of Developing Countries

    (3 cr) An examination of the prospects and problems of developing countries. The major theories of economic growth are explored. Issues and policies related to urbanization, agriculture, education, the environment, poverty, and international trade are analyzed from the perspective of the developing countries. Prerequisites: ECON 206  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ECON 340 - Applied Econometrics

    (3cr) The application of statistical techniques to the study of economic theories and questions. In particular, students will learn about the analytical tools used in applied economic research. Prerequisites: BADM 224  and ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 350 - Government and Business

    (3 cr) Government control of business in the United States will be examined, including the roles and responsibilities of business firms and governments in a market economy; industrial concentration; antitrust; multinational corporations; regulated industries; government promotion of business; consumer protection; and environmental regulations. Prerequisites: ECON 206  or ECON 123 .
  
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    ECON 360 - Game Theory

    (3cr) The study of the theories and methods used in the analysis of strategic situations. In particular, students will learn about economic applications of game theory, such as oligopoly pricing, production decisions and dynamic games. Prerequisites: ECON 123  or ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 370 - Environmental and Resource Economics

    (3cr) The study of economic theories and methods used in the analysis of the environment and natural resources. In particular, students will learn about environmental valuation, air and water pollution, and managing renewable and nonrenewable resources. Prerequisites: ECON 123  or ECON 206 .
  
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    ECON 392 - Cooperative Education in Economics

    (3-9 cr) May be repeated for credit, but not in the same term; topic must be different. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite/corequisite: Must have junior level standing with minimum 2.5 overall GPA, approval of academic department, and placement by the Career Center. Maximum of three credit hours may be used as economic elective credit by majors only.
  
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    ECON 450 - Seminar in Economics

    (3 cr) A summation of the major themes of economic theory along with application of certain of these theories within a policy context. Prerequisite/corequisite:  ECON 301  and ECON 302 .

     :   WM   CP


Economics (Graduate)

  
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    ECON 571 - The Teaching of Economics in A Global Economy: Principles and Strategies

    (3 cr) The purpose of this course is to furnish the K-12 teacher with sufficient knowledge of the basic economic principles to teach economic concepts, recognize economic issues, and effectively integrate economics into the social studies curriculum. In addition to reinforcing basic economic principles, teaching strategies (including experiments and games) and curriculum materials will be examined for use in classroom presentation.
  
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    ECON 599 - Special Topics: Economics

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of economics.
  
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    ECON 699 - Special Topics: Economics

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of economics.

Education

  
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    EDUC 150 - Seminar in Education

    (1 cr) Introduces the prospective teacher to the study of education. Focuses on the self as learner, the nature of education, and the practical issues in the work of teaching. Based on readings and field experiences the student will develop a philosophical, historical, and practical understanding of learning and teaching. Also introduces the student to the characteristics of the teacher education program’s philosophy and theme: Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver. Prerequisite to all education courses.

     

    CORE CODES:   FY

  
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    EDUC 200 - Foundations of American Education

    (3 cr) An examination of the relationship between the school as a social institution and the larger society. This is accomplished through a variety of ways, but mainly through a combination of philosophical, historical, and problem-oriented inquiry into that relationship. The assumption is that a teacher who has developed an understanding of the vital relationships between school and society is in a position to see his or her professional roles beyond the narrow confines of the classroom, and, out of such a perspective, will emerge a more sensitive and effective teacher. Students complete a 10-hour field experience. Prerequisites: EDUC 150  or MUSC 100 , and ENGL 102  with grades of C or better.

     

    CORE CODES:   SO   MD

  
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    EDUC 204 - History and Philosophy of the Middle School

    (3 cr) A historical and philosophical analysis of American educational thought and practice relevant to the development of the middle school. The themes of the course will center on the historical development of an educational structure and curriculum having as its focus the psychological, educational, and social needs of the emerging adolescent. The course will also examine the philosophical foundation of the middle school.
  
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    EDUC 306 - K-6 Field Experience

    (2 cr) An independently arranged field experience in a K-6 classroom.
  
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    EDUC 307 - 5-9 Field Experience

    (2 cr) An independently arranged field experience in a 5-9 classroom.
  
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    EDUC 308 - 9-12 Field Experience

    (2 cr) An independently arranged field experience in a 9-12 classroom.
  
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    EDUC 310 - Educational Sociology

    (3 cr) Designed to acquaint the student with education as a distinctly social phenomenon subject to objective scientific analysis. A sociological perspective on education requires that the student step back from that which he or she is examining, set aside his or her personal and cultural biases, and take a long, hard look at the phenomenon of education.
  
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    EDUC 315 - Overview of Early Education

    (2cr) This course is designed to acquaint students with the historic background and modern-day trends relative to the aims and content of the curriculum of early education. This course meets weekly and is designed to be taken concurrently with a field placement (EDUC 315L) in an early education classroom where field based assignments will be carried out. Corequisite: EDUC 315L or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDUC 315L - Overview of Early Education Practicum

    (1cr) The EDUC 315L practicum course is the companion section to the EDUC 315 seminar. The practicum course provides clinical experiences necessary to the practical application of those approaches unique to early education. Under the supervision of qualified professionals, students will observe in a variety of settings in which young children birth through eight are enrolled. Corequisite: EDUC 315  or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDUC 319 - Middle School Curriculum

    (3 cr) A course designed to acquaint the student with the relationship between the unique needs of the transescent child and the schooling process. Included are such variables as the nature of knowledge, of the learner, and of the schooling process. Other variables included are related to content learning. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program.
  
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    EDUC 320 - The Social and Psychological Conditions of Learning

    (4 cr) A reflective exploration of the knower (the learner), knowing (learning), the known (knowledge), and the contexts in which knowledge is constructed through teaching/learning. Includes a field component in a public school classroom.  Previously offered as 5 credits. Prerequisites: Grades of C or better in EDUC 150  or MUSC 100 ; and both EDUC 200  and COMM 202 .
  
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    EDUC 333 - Foundations of Literacy

    (3cr) This course introduces students to the five pillars of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension) and the connection between reading and writing instruction. Reading instruction, assessment, and methods to reinforce all aspects of literacy (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) across different types of text with children pre-K to fifth grade are presented. The role of family and culture, learning diversity, and language acquisition on the development of literacy skills are explored. 
  
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    EDUC 334 - Early Language and Literacy

    (4cr) This course builds on the knowledge of the five pillars of reading by introducing research and developmentally appropriate methods for promoting language development and emergent reading, writing, speaking and listening skills in early education. This course meets weekly and is designed to be taken concurrently with a field placement, EDUC 334L, in an early education classroom where field based assignments will be carried out.  Previously titled Instructional Strategies in Early Education (3cr). Prerequisites: EDUC 333 , EDUC 315  and EDUC 315L , or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EDUC 334L .
  
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    EDUC 334L - Early Language and Literacy Practicum

    (1-2cr) The EDUC 334L practicum course is the companion section to the EDUC 334 seminar. The practicum course provides clinical experiences necessary to the practical application of language and literacy approaches unique to early education. Students enroll in 1 credit of practicum for the Early Ed Endorsement. Students enroll in 2 credits of practicum for the Early Education Major. Under the supervision of qualified professionals, students will observe and participate in a setting in which young children from birth through eight are enrolled. Prerequisites: EDUC 333 , EDUC 315  and EDUC 315L , or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EDUC 334 .
  
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    EDUC 335 - Young Children with Exceptionalities

    (3cr) This course focuses on the etiologies and characteristics of various disabilities; various approaches to intervention; and the skills to integrate this knowledge with child development in order to work in interdisciplinary environments to develop effective programming for infants and young children with special needs.  This course meets weekly and is designed to be taken concurrently with a field placement, EDUC 335L, in an early education classroom where field based assignments will be carried out. Prerequisites: EDUC 315  and EDUC 315L , or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EDUC 335L .
  
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    EDUC 335L - Young Children with Exceptionalities Practicum

    (1-2cr) The EDUC 335L practicum course is the companion section to the EDUC 335 seminar.  The practicum course provides clinical experiences necessary to the practical application of approaches to meet the needs of students with exceptionalities. Under the supervision of professionals, students will observe and participate in a setting in which children from birth to eight are enrolled. Students enroll in 1 credit of practicum for the Early Ed Endorsement. Students enroll in 2 credits of practicum for the Early Education Major. Prerequisites: EDUC 315  and EDUC 315L , or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EDUC 335 .
  
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    EDUC 337 - Science and Social Studies for Young Children

    (2cr) EDUC 337 presents teacher candidates with content knowledge of developmentally appropriate science and social studies instruction for young children.  By exploring various methods and materials for differentiating and evaluating such instruction to meet the needs of individual learners, teacher candidates will explore ways to nurture children’s natural curiousity and scientific understanding. This course is part of the Shepherd University teacher education program which is founded on the philosophy and theme of “Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver.” The course is also based on the principles and standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the West Virginia Professional Teaching Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Initial Preparation Standards and the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers. Prerequisites: EDUC 333  and EDUC 315 /EDUC 315L , or permission of instructor.  Admission to teacher education program.
  
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    EDUC 338 - Mathematics for Young Children

    (2cr) EDUC 338 is designed to provide a developmental approach to mathematical concepts for young children.  The mathematical concepts discussed include counting, number sense, measurement, geometry, addition, subtraction, patterns, and displaying data. The importance of observing a young child’s interest in mathematics and extending interest through age-appropriate and real-life activities are emphasized. In addition the course explores ways to embed authentic assessment and how to use assessment information to develop activities further. This course is part of the Shepherd University teacher education program which is founded on the philosophy and theme of “Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver.” The course is also based on the principles and standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the West Virginia Professional Teaching Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Initial Preparation Standards and the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers. Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program, EDUC 333 , EDUC 315 /EDUC 315L , or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDUC 339 - Fine Motor, Gross Motor and Health for Young Children

    (2cr) EDUC 339 presents teacher candidates with content knowledge of motor development in young children and explores methods for assessing and developing increased psychomotor ability. It integrates this development with procedures and skills needed for creating and maintaining a safe environment in which children can use their increasing motor skills to develop self-help life skills and the decision-making/critical thinking and content understanding required for making healthy choices. This course is part of the Shepherd University teacher education program which is founded on the philosophy and theme of “Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver.” The course is also based on the principles and standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the West Virginia Professional Teaching Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Initial Preparation Standards and the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers. Prerequisites:  EDUC 333 , EDUC 315 /EDUC 315L  and permission of instructor. Admission to teacher education program.
  
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    EDUC 340 - Art and Music for Young Children

    (2cr) EDUC 340 presents teacher candidates with information on and opportunities to implement best practices in art and music instruction for young children in cross curricular culturally diverse units. Using art and music as the basis for developing oral language will be stressed as teacher candidates learn to accommodate and evaluate individual differences in children. This course is part of the Shepherd University teacher education program which is founded on the philosophy and theme of “Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver.” The course is also based on the principles and standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the West Virginia Professional Teaching Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Initial Preparation Standards and the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers. Prerequisites: EDUC 333 , EDUC 315 /EDUC 315L , and permission of instructor. Admission to teacher education program.
  
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    EDUC 341 - Math Methods for Elementary Teachers

    (3cr) An in-depth study of the elementary curriculum content examining methods, problems, and techniques involved in mathematics instruction. Prerequisites: MATH 102  and MATH 200 . Corequisite: EDUC 351  and EDUC 352 .
  
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    EDUC 351 - Integrated Reading and Language Arts I

    (5 cr) Integrated Reading and Language Arts I, in conjunction with its corequisite Integrated Math, Science, and Social Studies I, is the first semester of a two-semester course experience designed to promote the development of teachers who have a philosophical and principled understanding and commitment to an integrated curriculum and the practical strategies to implement such an education experience for children. This course block has both a classroom and a field component. Student will complete 50 hours in their field placement. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program, and EDUC 333 . Corequisite: EDUC 352 .
  
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    EDUC 352 - Integrated Math, Science, and Social Studies I

    (4 cr) Integrated Math, Science, and Social Studies I, in conjunction with its corequisite Integrated Reading and Language Arts I, is the first semester of a two-semester course experience designed to promote the development of teachers who have a philosophical and principled understanding and commitment to an integrated curriculum and the practical strategies to implement such an education experience for children. This course block has both a classroom and field component. Students will complete 50 hours in their field placement. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDUC 351 .
  
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    EDUC 353 - Integrated Reading and Language Arts II

    (4 cr) Integrated Reading and Language Arts II, in conjunction with its corequisite Integrated Math, Science, and Social Studies II, is the second semester of a two-semester course experience designed to promote the development of teachers who have a philosophical and principled understanding and commitment to an integrated curriculum and the practical strategies to implement such an education experience for children. This course block has both a classroom and field component. Students will complete 70 hours in their field placement. Prerequisites: EDUC 351  and EDUC 352 . Corequisite: EDUC 354 .
  
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    EDUC 354 - Integrated Math, Science, and Social Studies II

    (5 cr) Integrated Math, Science, and Social Studies II, in conjunction with its corequisite Integrated Reading and Language Arts II, is the second semester of a two-semester course experience designed to promote the development of teachers who have a philosophical and principled understanding and commitment to an integrated curriculum and the practical strategies to implement such an education experience for children. This course block has both a classroom and field component. Students will complete 70 hours in their field placement. Prerequisites: EDUC 351  and EDUC 352 . Corequisite: EDUC 353 .
  
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    EDUC 360 - Survey of Exceptional Children

    (3 cr) A course to familiarize the student with the nature, etiology, specific characteristics, and needs of the exceptional child. The course is designed to meet basic certification requirements in those states that require a minimum of three hours of course work in special education in order to be certified. It is equally relevant to early education, elementary education, secondary education, therapeutic recreation, psychology, and nursing.

     

    CORE CODES:   SO   MD

  
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    EDUC 361 - Child Guidance at Home and School

    (3cr) EDUC 361 is designed to increase understanding of children’s behavior. Effective techniques for dealing with  issues including separation, peer interaction, fears, frustrations and aggression will be explored. The course emphasizes teaching children pro-social interactions, self-control, and decision-making skills and focuses on understanding behavior as communication and expression. Strategies for environmental controls for behavior are emphasized. This course is part of the Shepherd University teacher education program which is founded on the philosophy and theme of “Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver.” The course is also based on the principles and standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the West Virginia Professional Teaching Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Initial Preparation Standards and the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers. Students must have access to children, preferably in a classroom setting.
  
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    EDUC 362 - Observing, Documenting, and Assessing Young Children’s Development

    (3cr) The focus of EDUC 362 is for students to develop an understanding of how documentation based on close observation of children’s learning processes helps to making learning noticeable and shape the learning that occurs in young children.  Students will learn why assessment of young children’s strengths, progress, and significant concerns that require focused intervention requires assessment strategies that are developmentally appropriate, culturally and linguistically responsive, connected to children’s daily activities and inclusive of families. Students will evaluate the impact of the children’s activities and teacher strategies and create change in early childhood programs. The important of continued professional development and continued accountability will also be emphasized. This course is part of the Shepherd University teacher education program which is founded on the philosophy and theme of “Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver.” The course is also based on the principles and standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the West Virginia Professional Teaching Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Initial Preparation Standards and the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers. Students must have access to children, preferably in a classroom setting. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program.
  
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    EDUC 370 - Creating Learning Environments

    (3cr) This is a secondary methods course designed to implement educational theory into practice. The purpose is to provide knowledge and appreciation of variables affecting positive and negative learning environments, including but not limited to the following: goals and stated expectations, decisions regarding appropriate content, planning methods, understanding of developmental characteristics of students, consideration of learning styles and various ability levels, controls of classroom climate, selection of teaching strategies, selection and creation of instructional resources, adaptation to changes in the school programs and school personnel, collaboration with colleagues, programming for exceptional children, multicultural education and issues of equity, and meaningfulness in assessment. Includes a field component. Prerequisites: EDUC 360 or ARED 180 or PHED 401
  
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    EDUC 380 - Innovative Technology

    (3 cr) This course aims to assist pre-service teacher candidates in the development and usage of innovative 21st Century technology. Students will implement technology to enhance the instruction, assessment and organization practices in PK-12 learning environments. This course is designed to increase the attentiveness of teacher candidates as to how technology can benefit educational practices and delivery by researching and addressing emerging trends in the educational field. Previously titled Technology in 21st-Century Teaching and Learning. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program.
  
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    EDUC 381 - Interactive Technology for Young Children

    (3cr) EDUC 381 is a course designed to familiarize teacher candidates with the use of technology in early education settings as both a tool to collecting and managing data about student achievement as well as its use as an instructional tool providing students with high quality instruction as they develop skills needed for the 21st century. Students will examine best practices and evaluate the implementation of various hardware and software tools as they design instruction that meets the needs of both typically developing students and those with special needs. This course is part of the Shepherd University teacher education program which is founded on the philosophy and theme of “Teacher as Reflective Problem Solver.” The course is also based on the principles and standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the West Virginia Professional Teaching Standards, the Council for Exceptional Children Initial Preparation Standards and the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers. Students must have access to children, preferably in a classroom setting. Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program.
  
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    EDUC 390 - Experiential Learning

    (1-6 cr) The student is involved with various service learning activities. Related to the student’s professional development, this experience can include peer tutoring, volunteerism, laboratory assistant, independent research, and community program. Proposal must be approved by specialization coordinator. Minimum 50 hours of contact for each credit is required. Student can take 1 to 3 credit hours per semester not to exceed 6 credits total. Course is offered on a pass/fail basis. Offered every term.
  
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    EDUC 392 - Cooperative Education

    (1-9 cr) Cooperative education allows students to acquire practical experience in education settings beyond the boundaries of the campus. May be repeated for credit, but not in same semester. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: Minimum 2.3 overall GPA, 2.5 in major, approval of Department of Education, and placement by Cooperative Education Office.
  
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    EDUC 400 - Inclusion in the Regular Classroom

    (3 cr) A weekly seminar taken concurrently with student teaching. Students will investigate and examine how to meet the needs of students identified with special needs who are placed in the regular classroom. Promotes the reflective analysis of the practice of teaching in an inclusive classroom in grades K-6, 5-9, PreK-Adult, 5-Adult, 9-Adult.
  
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    EDUC 420 - Special Methods of Teaching Mathematics

    (3 cr) A special methods course for secondary education majors in mathematics. An in-depth study of special methods, curriculum, problems, and techniques involved in mathematics instruction. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or 435 .
  
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    EDUC 421 - Special Methods of Teaching English

    (3 cr) Current approaches in the teaching of English in the secondary school. Topics include basic teaching procedures and approaches in composition, literature, and grammar; the secondary reading program; critical examination of recent texts; educational media in the field of language arts instruction; materials of instruction. This course is not taught every semester. Students should check in advance with department chair. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or 443 .
  
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    EDUC 422 - Special Methods of Teaching Social Studies

    (3 cr) Designed to acquaint the student with the philosophy, aims, and methods of teaching social studies in the secondary school. This course is not taught every semester. Students should check in advance with department chair. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or 443 .
  
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    EDUC 423 - Special Methods of Teaching Science

    (3 cr) Reflective problem solving in science and science teaching is the major thrust of this course. The student is introduced to or reacquainted with the goals and objectives of modern science education, including scientific literacy for all students. The constructivist approach to learn science is emphasized as students investigate, consider, select, develop, employ, and evaluate a variety of instructional methods, resources, and assessment techniques. Educational technologies currently impacting science teaching/learning are considered, as are the issues of safety and classroom and laboratory management. This course is not taught every semester. Students should check in advance with the natural sciences teaching specializations coordinator. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or EDUC 443 .
  
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    EDUC 425 - Special Methods of Teaching Foreign Language

    (3 cr) A course designed to acquaint students with the theories of language acquisition and prepare the students to teach language in context and use computer-aided language teaching methods. Students will develop lesson plans and teaching portfolios and will get practical experience teaching foreign language at the 101/102 level. This course is not taught every semester. Students should check in advance with the department chair. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or EDUC 443 .
  
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    EDUC 426 - Special Methods of Teaching Music

    (3 cr) A course designed to aid the participants in constructing a working philosophy of music in the schools in which all music activities and courses can be viewed in proper perspective. In addition, emphasis is placed on the refining of known skills as applicable to the means by which music objectives can be realized; developing and administering the band and choral programs along with instrumental and vocal techniques; conducting such specialized music courses as music theory, history, and introduction to music; and examining appropriate teaching materials. This course is not taught every semester. Students should check in advance with department chair. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or 443 .
  
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    EDUC 427 - Special Methods for Teaching Art

    (3 cr) This course is designed to provide a synthesis of course work in art, education, and art education for advanced art education majors. Students will explore the nature of teaching visual art in contemporary K-12 grade classrooms including, for example, methods to teach art studio, art criticism, aesthetics, and art history; devices to evaluate student progress; inclusive instructional practices; and instruction in the use of technology. In addition, students will construct and critique a complete nine-month art curriculum useful for teaching in a West Virginia or nearby local public school system. This course is not taught every semester. Students should check in advance with department chair. Prerequisites: ART 104 , ART 170  , ARED 345 , ART 403 , and admission to Teacher Education Program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or 443 .
  
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    EDUC 428 - Special Methods of Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences

    (4 cr) Current approaches to solving problems directly related to teaching: writing a philosophy, determining objectives, planning teaching strategies, and evaluating learning. This course is not taught every semester. Students should check in advance with department chair. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or 443 .
  
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    EDUC 435 - Special Methods Practicum

    (2 cr) This is a field experience course for all students seeking certification in a secondary teacher education program. A weekly University seminar accompanies the field work. Students will arrange their field work schedules so that they may meet their individual professional development needs. A minimum of 30 hours in a public school is required. Seminar content and field tasks are coordinated with special methods course instructors. This course must be taken concurrently with a special methods course. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program and EDUC 319  or EDUC 370 .
  
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    EDUC 442 - Reading and Language Arts

    (3 cr) Methods, materials, and techniques for teaching reading and language arts in the classroom.
  
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    EDUC 443 - Reading in the Content Areas

    (3 cr) This is a field experience course for all students seeking certification in a secondary teacher education program. An on-campus seminar will focus on reading instruction in the content areas of the curriculum. Attention is given to the identification of the special reading abilities required in the subject matter areas. Students will focus many of their in-field lessons on the teaching of reading in the content area. Students will arrange their field work schedules so that they may meet their individual professional development needs. A minimum of 40 hours in a public school is required. Prerequisites: EDUC 370  or EDUC 319 . Corequisite: Special Methods course for students’ content area.
  
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    EDUC 449 - Stud Tch Prac for EE

    (6cr) Provides an in-depth clinical experience in the public school prekindergarten or kindergarten setting, under the supervision of experienced personnel.  The extended immersion practicum phase of the Teacher Education Program is vital to student teachers’ understanding of personal abilities, skills, goals, and developmental processes. Making connections between theory and practice through initiative, inquiry, and integration is the principal focus. Previously offered at 9cr. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of West Virginia requirements for teaching licensure.
  
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    EDUC 450 - Student Teaching, Elementary School Grades K-6

    (6cr) Provides an in-depth clinical experience in the public school, at the appropriate grade level, under the supervision of experienced personnel. Previously offered at 9cr. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of all requirements for student teaching.

     :   CP

  
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    EDUC 455 - Student Teaching, Grades K-Adult

    (9 cr) Limited to those students in the K-12 programs of physical education, art, and music. Gives insight, through study and observation, and provides skill through planning and teaching to enable the graduates to handle successfully all types of teaching situations in secondary, middle, and elementary schools. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of West Virginia requirements for a teaching license.

     :   CP

  
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    EDUC 456 - Student Teaching, Grades 5-Adult

    (9 cr) Gives insight, through study and observation, and provides skill through planning and teaching to enable the graduates to handle successfully all types of teaching situations in middle and secondary schools. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of West Virginia requirements for a teaching license.

     :   CP

  
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    EDUC 457 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-Adult

    (9 cr) Gives insight, through study and observation, and provides skill through planning and teaching to enable the graduates to handle successfully all types of teaching situations in secondary schools. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of West Virginia requirements for a teaching license.

     :   CP

  
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    EDUC 461 - Student Teaching Seminar

    (3cr) This course is intended as a supportive seminar for teacher candidate completion of the edTPA (Education Teacher Performance Assessment). Corequisite: Student Teaching.

     

    CORE CODES :  WM


Education (Graduate)

  
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    EDUC 500 - Advancing the Use of Technology in the Classroom

    (3 cr) The focus of this course is the effective use of 21st-century technology in the modern classroom. This course helps educators view technology as a different way of thinking rather than simply as a more effective way of conducting traditional education. This course provides a critical analysis of the full range of educational technology and its use in the classroom. In this course educators will develop their visual literacy and talents and in turn improve their levels of instruction and effectiveness in an ever-changing technology-based classroom.
  
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    EDUC 502 - Curriculum and Pedagogy

    (3 cr) The focus of this required course is the exploration of pedagogy and its relationship to the development of curriculum. Through a better understanding of key methodologies and strategies for developing an integrated curriculum, educators will learn the most effective methods for implementing such a curriculum into their daily classrooms. While studying these strategies and methodologies educators will learn how to better hone both their teaching and curriculum development skills.
  
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    EDUC 503 - Literacy in the Content Area

    (3cr) This course concentrates on literacy instruction in the content areas of the curriculum. Attention is focused on the assessment of student literacy abilities (both affective and cognitive), academic language demands in relationship to student abilities, and the implementation of appropriate language supports for reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing in subject specific instruction. Various research-supported literacy strategies appropriate to integrated content area instruction are explored. This course requires a 50 hour practicum in a classroom consistent with the candidate’s area of specialization. Previously titled Reading in the Content Area.
  
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    EDUC 504 - Structures of Effective Student Assessment

    (3 cr) The focus of this required course is the study of the history, theory, and practice of student assessment within the classroom. Educators will explore the role of traditional assessment including testing as well as available alternative methods of assessment. Educators will examine current methods of effective assessment techniques and discuss how assessment can best be applied to today’s curriculum.
  
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    EDUC 520 - Conceptual Development for Integrating Language Arts and Social Studies

    (3 cr) Students will explore concepts, techniques, and strategies for the effective teaching and integration of language arts and social studies. They will also investigate current issues, practices, materials, and curriculum development appropriate for teaching/learning in the elementary grades. The use of children’s literature with language arts and social studies curricula will be emphasized. Course includes in-school field assignments.
  
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    EDUC 521 - Conceptual Development of Integrating Mathematics and Science

    (3 cr) This course will investigate and explore the conceptual basis for integrating mathematics and science in the elementary classroom. Students will explore instructional activities that integrate science and math across curricular areas, are applicable to daily life, are developmentally appropriate, and apply appropriate and varied assessment strategies. Students will understand and apply the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards and National Science Education Standards in planning and delivering an integrated mathematics and science curriculum.
  
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    EDUC 522 - Contemporary Issues in Education

    (3 cr) This course examines current issues affecting schools and the impact these issues will have in the 21st century. Education has a long history of conflicting ideas. An effort will be made to explore critical issues from divergent points of view. Educators will question, analyze, and discuss these critical issues. In addition, teachers will become familiar with several models of school reform in order to more effectively deal with the crucial issues they must face as educators.
  
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    EDUC 523 - Diversity Awareness and Collaborative Practice

    (3 cr) This course is designed to better prepare teachers to meet the needs of increasingly diverse classrooms, schools, and communities. Using case studies, role-playing, techology, current literature, and a field experience, teachers will be exposed to and will analyze the dynamics of diversity in their professional school sites.  As a result of their field experience and in collaboration with parents and community support, participants are expected to develop a Human Rights Action Plan incorporating principles of human and social justice.
  
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    EDUC 524 - Investigations of Learning in Context

    (3 cr) This course is designed to focus in on the social and psychological factors that affect the learning process. It explores the learning process as well as the learner. By gaining a better understanding of key social paradigms and critical psychological stages of developmental learning, educators are better able to determine the most effective teaching strategies.
  
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    EDUC 525 - Collaborative Methods in the Inclusive Classroom

    (3cr) This course is designed to help educators develop strategies and techniques for working with the exceptional child. Educators will develop an understanding of a wide range of exceptionalities, ranging from students with severe educational challenges to gifted and talented students. Research, attitudes, and current practices as they relate to exceptional children will be discussed and analyzed.  Previously titled The Special Learner in the Regular Classroom.
  
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    EDUC 526 - Teacher as a Creative Catalyst

    (3 cr) This course introduces educators to nontraditional modes of thinking and problem solving through the exploration of new and creative modes of planning and assessment. Educators will become familiar with the research on creativity and learn creative techniques to employ in their own classrooms. This course will focus on creativity as universal in children of all cultures.
  
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    EDUC 527 - Inclusion Seminar

    (3cr) A weekly seminar taken concurrently with student teaching, this course is designed to provide participants the opportunity for reflective analysis and practical application of strategies appropriate for teaching in an inclusive setting. Based on reading, student assessment tools, and analysis of the student teaching experience, the student will further develop understanding of: determination of present levels of student performance, effectiveness of instructional strategies, assessment, and reflective teaching. Corequisite:  EDUC 601 , EDUC 602 , or EDUC 603 .
  
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    EDUC 560 - Survey of Exceptionalities

    (3 cr) A course to familiarize the student with the nature, etiology, specific characteristics, and needs of the exceptional child.
  
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    EDUC 562 - Individualized Education Planning (IEP)

    (3cr) This course is designed to teach special educators the use of multiple types of assessment information for a variety of educatioinal decisions such as determination of eligibility, writing IEP goals and progress monitoring those goals. The Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) requires that each student with a suspected disability receive a full individual, non-discriminatory evaluation to determine eligibility for special education services. The results of this evaluation will be used by a multi-disciplinary team to help determine necessary instructional modifications, amount and type of special education supports necessary, and to develop individual educational objectives. In addition, once a student receives special education services, the need for those services must be reviewed and revised as needed, but at least once a year. Therefore, special educators must understand the legal policies and ethical principles of measurement and assessment related to referral, eligibility, program planning, instruction, and placement for individuals with exceptional learning needs, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Special educators must also understand measurement theory and practices for addressing issues of validity, reliability, norms, bias, and interpretation of assessment results. Finally, this course will address assistive technology and determine the need for this technology based upon assessment and data collection.
 

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