May 19, 2022  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

French

  
  •  

    FREN 111 - Study Abroad

    (3cr) Shepherd University will offer a series of study abroad opportunities in a number of French-speaking countries such as Canada (Quebec), France, and Senegal. Students will be immersed in the target language through classroom instruction, family homestay, and cultural activities. Open to freshmen only.
  
  •  

    FREN 203 - Intermediate French I

    (3 cr) A review of the basic structures and phonetics of the French language studied through readings and discussions of French cultural and literary selections and enhanced through further oral communication practices, brief compositions, and oral reports. Prerequisites: FREN 101  and FREN 102 .

     :   HM   GL

  
  •  

    FREN 204 - Intermediate French II

    (3 cr) A continuation of FREN 203 , this course is designed for more advanced students and allows them to strengthen their proficiency in French through advanced structural and oral exercises and several different kinds of writing assignments. Prerequisites:  FREN 101 , FREN 102 , and FREN 203 .

     :   HM   GL

  
  •  

    FREN 301 - Advanced Conversation and Composition

    (3 cr) A course designed to help students sharpen their oral and writing skills through the use of guided conversation and composition. Prerequisites: FREN 204  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 306 - Introduction to France and the Francophone World

    (3 cr) This course is an introduction to France and French-speaking countries around the world. Students will gain an understanding of these cultures from a political, historical, social, and literary perspective. Prerequisites: FREN 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 307 - Introduction to French and Francophone Literature

    (3 cr) An introduction to textual analysis, the course comprises prose, poetry, and drama. The texts are studied using current critical techniques. Prerequisites: FREN 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 308 - French Culture and Civilization

    (3 cr) This course provides an in-depth, critical study of two or three aspects of French culture and civilization. Course content will be determined by the individual instructor but can cover any cultural product or institution from any time period. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 309 - Francophone Culture and Civilization

    (3 cr) This course provides an in-depth, critical study of two or three aspects of Francophone culture and civilization. Course content will be determined by the individual instructor but can cover any cultural product or institution from any time period. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 311 - Survey of French Literature

    (3 cr) A study of the major literary and philosophical movements in France from the 18th through the 21st century. The student will be exposed to examples of theater, prose, and poetry. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 313 - Survey of Francophone Literature

    (3 cr) A study of major literary works from French-speaking areas in North America, Africa, and the Caribbean from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 367 - Francophone Film Studies

    (3 cr) An in-depth critical study of selected films. Course content will be determined by the individual instructor, but can cover any aspect of Francophone cinema, i.e., films of any time period, any genre, or any Francophone country. The language of instruction is French. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 410 - Practicum in French

    (3cr) A course designed in alliance with the Washington Semester program or co-op program to allow university credit for practical work experience in the Washington/Baltiimore areas. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , and permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 411 - Study Abroad

    (3 cr) Shepherd University will offer a series of study abroad opportunities in a number of French-speaking countries such as Canada (Quebec), France, and Senegal. Students will be immersed in the target language through classroom instruction, family homestay, and cultural activities. Repeatable up to 9 hours. Prerequisites: FREN 101  and 102 .
  
  •  

    FREN 412 - French-Language Short Story

    (3 cr) This course is a study of the short story (conte) in France and French-speaking countries from its beginnings to the contemporary period, with representative readings. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 414 - French-Language Novel

    (3 cr) This course is a study of the novel in France and French-speaking countries from its beginnings to the contemporary period, with representative readings. Prerequisites: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 416 - Seminar in French Literature

    (3 cr) A seminar course focusing on a literary genre, movement, period, or figure chosen by the instructor and approved by the coordinator. The student is expected to attend regular meetings of the seminar, participate in open discussions, and present a series of short written and oral reports related to the topic chosen for study. The student is also responsible for submitting a major documented paper which individually investigates an aspect of the topics of the course as a whole Prerequisite/corequisite: FREN 301 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FREN 419 - Independent Study in French

    (1-3 cr) See Independent Study Program. All plans of study and syllabi must be approved by the department.

Gender and Women’s Studies

  
  •  

    GWST 201 - Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies

    (3 cr) A team-taught multi-disciplinary course dealing with gender and women’s studies texts from disciplines such as the social sciences, humanities, fine arts, and natural sciences.  Formerly WMST 201-Introduction to Women’s Studies: Theory Across the Disciplines.

    CORE CODES :  SO   MD    CK

  
  •  

    GWST 350 - Seminar in Gender and Women’s Studies

    (3 cr) This course will vary in content with each offering as areas of particular interest not covered by the regular curriculum are explored.  Previously WMST 350 Seminar in Women’s Studies. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits, when topics are unique.

General Science

  
  •  

    GSCI 101 - Astronomy I

    (4 cr) An introductory survey course in astronomy covering aspects of observational astronomy and the solar system. Historical developments, discoveries, and advances also will be discussed, compared, and contrasted. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour lab per week.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
  •  

    GSCI 102 - Astronomy II

    (4 cr) This course will cover aspects of astronomy such as stellar formation and evolution, galaxies, and cosmology. Recent discoveries with fundamental implications for modern astronomy also will be explored. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour lab per week.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
  •  

    GSCI 103 - General Physical Science

    (4 cr) A survey course designed to explore the major physical phenomena in the natural sciences, encompassing a study of motion, energy, electromagnetism, waves (light and sound), and atomic and nuclear physics. The course will meet in three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory session.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
  •  

    GSCI 104 - General Physical Science

    (4 cr) A survey course in physical science encompassing astronomy, meteorology, and geology. The principles and applications presented are characteristic of introductory courses in those separate areas. Scientific approaches to problem-solving and the interdependency of the areas of science are emphasized. This course will meet in three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory session.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
  •  

    GSCI 300 - History of Science

    (3 cr) A general survey of the progress of science from earliest times to the present. The main scientific discoveries and theories are considered in their historical perspective.
  
  •  

    GSCI 301 - Physical Geology

    (4 cr) A combined course in physical and historical geology dealing with the composition, structure and history of planet Earth. Minerals, rocks, tectonic processes, and physical characteristics of the earth’s surface will be emphasized in the physical component. Evolution, fossils, and the changing conditions and organisms throughout geologic time constitute the historical component. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
  
  •  

    GSCI 302 - General Astronomy

    (4 cr) A descriptive course dealing with the physical nature of the planets and stars as seen through modern astronomy. The history of astronomical observation and development of modern principles along with properties of electromagnetic radiation and gravitation are included in the course. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
  
  •  

    GSCI 303 - Meteorology

    (4 cr) A course dealing with the composition and structure of the atmosphere, the energy which drives it, and the physical processes involved in weather phenomena. The gathering and analysis of pertinent data are emphasized. Weather forecasting and climatology are also considered. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
  
  •  

    GSCI 306 - Introduction to Oceanography and Laboratory

    (4 cr) A survey of oceanography at an introductory level, involving the properties of sea water and its movement; the chemistry, physics, and biology of the ocean; bathymetric features and submarine geology; and oceanographic instruments and methods of collecting data.  Prerequisites: ENVS 201  and ENVS 202  (including labs), or BIOL 211  and BIOL 212 .
  
  •  

    GSCI 312 - Historical Geology

    (4 cr) A course dealing with the history of planet earth focusing on the interplay between platetectonics and life. Plate boundary positions throughout geologic time will be covered as will life on the planet over the last 3.7 billion years. Evolution, fossils, and the changing conditions and organisms throughout geologic time will be emphasized. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
  
  •  

    GSCI 320 - Special Studies in General Science

    (1-3 cr) The study of special topics in general science of special interest to students and faculty, including those topics which may be the subjects of selected television series or other media presentations.
  
  •  

    GSCI 350 - Natural Science Interpretation

    (3 cr) A study of the general principles of science interpretation for the lay public. Individual preparation of programs in various formats, e.g., nature walk, fireside talk, museum presentation is expected. Extensive use is made of interpretive centers in the region.

General Science (Graduate)

  
  •  

    GSCI 540 - Principles of Scientific Investigation

    (3 cr) This course addresses several themes related to the process of science. The main areas covered are the philosophical and historical background of science, the processes and abilities required to conduct scientific inquiry, the written and oral presentation of data, the use and evaluation of scientific literature, the safe and appropriate use of chemicals and organisms in research, scientific ethics, and the role that science and scientists play in society. While the universality of the scientific approach to problem solving will be stressed rather than specific disciplines, most examples will come from the biological and chemical sciences. Readings will be assigned from several textbooks and journal articles and students will prepare and present a research paper. The prerequisite is a bachelor’s degree with preparation in the sciences.
  
  •  

    GSCI 541 - Historical Geology

    (3 cr) This course emphasizes all major components included in historical geology focusing on the study of earth’s evolution, which includes changes in the planet’s crust, surface, atmosphere, and life through time. Topics covered include the evolution and characterization of life throughout geologic time, plate tectonic theory and changing continental position through geologic time, origin of life, major extinctions and their causes, taxonomy and paleobiology of fossils, classification of sedimentary rocks, and lithologic facies analysis.
  
  •  

    GSCI 542 - General Astronomy

    (3 cr) Fundamental principles and findings of the major branches of modern astronomy. Topics include comparative planetology, stellar formation and evolution, structure and evolution of galaxies, and physical and observational cosmology.
  
  •  

    GSCI 543 - Environmental Chemistry

    (3 cr) Lecture topics in this course include stratospheric and tropospheric air chemistry and air pollution, the greenhouse effect and global warming, energy use and carbon dioxide emission, toxic organic and inorganic compounds, the chemistry of natural waters and water pollution, green chemistry, and waste management. In the laboratory volumetric and instrumental methods are used to measure environmentally important chemicals. The instrumental techniques include UV-VIS and IR spectroscopy, GC-MS, and HPLC.
  
  •  

    GSCI 599 - Special Topics: General Science

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of general science.
  
  •  

    GSCI 699 - Special Topics: General Science

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of general science.

General Studies Physical Education

  
  •  

    GSPE 162 - Springboard Diving

    General Studies Physical Education Course for Elective Credit
  
  •  

    GSPE 182 - Snow Skiing III

    General Studies Physical Education Course for Elective Credit
  
  •  

    GSPE 210 - Fitness for Life

    (3 cr) Educated persons should know how to care for their bodies as well as their minds. Although most people would like to live longer, most would agree that the quality of one’s life is more important than longevity. The wellness approach emphasizes prevention of disease and disability, promotes optimal living in all dimensions of wellness, and provides a foundation for a productive and satisfying life. The activity and laboratory sessions included in this course allow for practical application of concepts and will, hopefully, establish the pattern for a lifetime of fitness and wellness as well as an appreciation of the fun and enjoyment of physical exercise.

      :  WE

Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 105 - World Cultural Geography

    (3 cr) A survey of human populations in their natural environments by the study of physical and cultural geographic components such as climate, landforms, culture, migration, settlement, economic activities, and global interconnectedness. Emphasis on geographic skills development through the use of maps, models, and satellite imagery.

     :   SO   GL

  
  •  

    GEOG 201 - Physical Geography

    (3 cr) Focuses on the Earth’s place in the solar system; continental drift theory; global energy-flow patterns; the causes and characteristics of climate, including atmospheric pressure, air and water circulation, air masses, and storms; landforms; biogeography; and climatic-biotic soil-forming processes.
  
  •  

    GEOG 202 - World Regions

    (3 cr) In-depth analysis of world regions including physical and cultural geographic elements, human-land relationships, economic patterns, transportation and communication, urban systems, political patterns, and contemporary issues. Emphasis on geographic skills development through the use of maps, data, and comparative case studies.

     :   SO   GL

  
  •  

    GEOG 301 - World Economic Geography

    (3 cr) A topical geographical approach to world resources, including resource extraction and systems of production, distribution, and consumption. Topics include food production and food scarcity, technological and industrial change, post industrialism, the service sector, measures of development, globalization, human impacts on the environment, sustainability, and economic ties between countries and regions with the context of a global economy.
  
  •  

    GEOG 307 - Population and Development

    (3cr) The study of human populations and their interactions with physical environments from a geographic perspective. Focus is on demographic trends, health issues, and socio-economic development at the local to global scales. Changes in population size, composition, and distribution are intricately intertwined with development issues. The course introduces students to basic demographic data and procedures through a variety of methods and resources, including hands-on exercises. Students may not receive credit for both this course and SOCI 307.
  
  •  

    GEOG 400 - Geography of Latin America

    (3 cr) A regional geographic approach to the human and physical characteristics of Middle and South America and the Caribbean, with topics including colonial history and its legacies, landforms and climate, population, languages and religions, agricultural systems, urban and industrial development, ecological issues, and the integration of countries and regions into the global economy.
  
  •  

    GEOG 401 - Geography of Europe

    (3 cr) A regional geographic approach to the human and physical characteristics of Europe excluding Russia, with emphasis on regional differences and interrelationships. Topics include landforms, climate and hydrology; population trends and policies; languages and religions; rural and urban settlement patterns; environmental challenges; regional economic integration and the global economy; and ongoing issues of European integration. Students will use and critically evaluate hard copy resources as well as online interactive maps, images, and databases.
  
  •  

    GEOG 402 - Geography of U.S. and Canada

    (3 cr) A regional geographic approach to the human and physical characteristics of the U.S. and Canada, with emphasis on population patterns and trends, cultural landscapes, resource development, human-land relationships, and regional differences and interrelationships. The course utilizes comparative case studies on regions and topics and online geographic tools such as interactive maps and databases in the study of patterns, processes, and relationships.
  
  •  

    GEOG 403 - Geography of Russia

    (3cr) A regional geographic approach to the human and physical characteristics of Russia, with topics including its physical regions, climate types and challenges, Soviet legacies, the Russian core and periphery, ethnic diversity, political geography, relationship to neighbor countries, systems of production, ecological challenges, and place in the global economy.  Previously titled Geography of the Former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.
  
  •  

    GEOG 407 - Geography of Asia

    (3 cr) A regional geographic approach to the human and physical characteristics of East and South Asia, excluding Oceania, with topics including colonial history and its legacies, landforms, Pacific Ring of Fire, climate and climate hazards, rural and urban settlements, population issues and policies, languages and religions, economic systems, agricultural production, human-land impacts, and the integration of countries and regions into the global economy.
  
  •  

    GEOG 408 - Geography of Africa

    (3 cr) A regional geographic approach to the human and physical characteristics of the African continent, with topics including colonialism and its legacies, landforms and climate, ethnic diversity, languages and religions, economic systems, urban development, water and food scarcity, sustainable agriculture, health issues, and the integration of countries and regions into the global economy.

German

  
  •  

    GERM 101 - Elementary German I

    (3 cr) The study of fundamentals of the German language, with emphasis on pattern exercises, questions and answers, reading and discussion of stories and German dialogue; also pronunciation during classes and listening during required laboratory hours to CDs, videos, and tapes in German.  Effective Fall 2014, no longer fulfills Core Curriculum Tier Two Humanities.
  
  •  

    GERM 102 - Elementary German II

    (3 cr) A continuation of GERM 101 . Discussion and conversation in German, also extensive study of regular and irregular verbs, idioms, and readings in German prose and poetry.  Effective Fall 2014, no longer fulfills Core Curriculum Tier Two Humanities. Prerequisites: GERM 101 .
  
  •  

    GERM 203 - Intermediate German I

    (3 cr) A concentration of German grammar, verbs, and idioms, stressing pattern exercises in German, conversation, reading, and discussion of German literature, culture, and history. Prerequisites: GERM 101  and GERM 102 .

     :   HM   GL

  
  •  

    GERM 204 - Intermediate German II

    (3 cr) A continuation of GERM 203. Grammar review and study of literature, supplemented with translations, reading, and conversation in German. Prerequisites: GERM 101 , GERM 102 , and GERM 203 .

     :   HM   GL

  
  •  

    GERM 301 - Advanced Conversation and Composition I

    (3cr) A course designed to help students sharpen their oral and writing skills through the use of guided conversation and exposition. Topics for discussion include the family and cultural differences. Prerequisites: GERM 204  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    GERM 367 - German Film Studies

    (3cr) An in-depth critical study of selected films. Course content will be determined by the individual instructor, but can cover any aspect of German cinema, i.e., films of any time period, any genre, or any German-speaking country. The language of instruction is German. Prerequisites: GERM 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    GERM 410 - Practicum in German

    (3cr) A course designed to allow university credit for practical work experience in the US or abroad. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: GERM 301  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    GERM 411 - Study Abroad

    (3cr) Shepherd University will offer a series of study abroad opportunities in German-speaking countries. In order to get credit for this course, students must complete activities prior to departure, while in country, and after returning from study abroad. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    GERM 419 - Independent Study in German

    (1-6cr) An independent plan of study determined by the instructor and the student, with syllabus approved by the department. See detailed requirements for Independent Study in Section V, Academic Information. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.

Global Studies

  
  •  

    GLBL 200 - Introduction to Global Studies

    (3cr) This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary analyses of contemporary global issues and problems, such as social and economic inequalities, war, terrorism, globalization, and sustainability. The analyses will include historical, cultural, geographical, ecological, economic, political, and other perspectives. Students will be familiarized with major international organizations such as the United Nations and World Bank. The course may include field trips and guest speakers.
  
  •  

    GLBL 350 - International Experience

    (3cr) After approval by the Global Studies Director each student will participate in an international experience appropriate to his or her background and concentration within the major. The experience shall involve significant cultural immersion, such as study abroad, internship, or service learning project. Specific course requirements will be outlined in the course syllabus, e.g., a research paper, field notes, reflective paper or journal. It is recommended that students complete GLBL 200  before enrolling in this course.  Permission of Global Studies Director required. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
  •  

    GLBL 450 - Capstone in Global Studies

    (3cr) As the culmination of the Global Studies major, each student will develop and complete a project. The project will integrate and apply the theoretical, methodological, and intellectual underpinnings of global studies, as well as develop students’ research, writing, and presentation skills. It is recommended that students complete a minimum of 30 credits in the major, including the International Experience, before enrolling in this course.  Permission of Global Studies Director required.

    CORE CODES :   WM   CP


Graphic Design

  
  •  

    GRDS 307 - Graphic Design I

    (3cr) This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of the design field and explores the fundamentals of the design problem. Throughout the course, the student will complete projects while learning methods for creating adaptive solutions, and sharpening conceptual, technical, and problem-solving skills. Emphasis is placed on research, ideation, process, documentation and craft. Previously titled GRDS 200 - Graphic Design I (beginning Fall 2005), GRDS 200 - Introduction to Graphic Design (beginning Fall 2009), GRDS 200 - Design Process & Form (beginning Spring 2012). Prerequisites: ART 150 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 312 - Graphic Design II

    (3 cr) This course investigates the communication challenges of a client-driven profession through projects that demand conceptual thinking and visual problem-solving skills, and which require strict adherence to specifications, deadlines and presentation standards. The importance of research, ideation, process, documentation and craft are stressed.  Previously offered as GRDS 274 - Graphic Design II (beginning Spring 1999), GRDS 340-Graphic Design II (beginning Fall 2005), GRDS 340 - Intermediate Graphic Design (beginning Fall 2009), GRDS 312 - Design Applications I (beginning Spring 2012). Prerequisites: GRDS 307 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 317 - Web Interface Design

    (3 cr) This course focuses on the design for screen-based experiences. Students will focus on the visual aesthetics of the experience, consider the role of the user, and be introduced to human-centered research methods. In addition, the class encourages a critical examination of networked experiences and challenges students to expand the creative potentials of the medium. Previously offered as GRDS 442 - Website Design. Prerequisites: GRDS 307 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 400 - Special Topics in Graphic Design

    (3 cr) This course provides the student an opportunity to explore in-depth a specialization in the graphic design industry. Topics may include branding design, packaging design, publication design, user-experience design, and environmental design. Other topics address critical thinking in gradphic design and may include such issues as design and social responsibility, design for democracy, and design for global audiences, among others. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: 9 credits in graphic design.
  
  •  

    GRDS 412 - Graphic Design III

    (3 cr) This course focuses on designing whole campaigns and considers how a solution transitions from traditional to digital for a seamless, unified experience. Emphasis will be placed on research, takeholder and user analysis, prototyping and product development, and meeting the goals of the proposed client problem.  Previously offered as GRDS 360-Digital Studio II (beginning Fall 2005), and GRDS 412-Design Applications II (beginning Spring 2012). Prerequisites: GRDS 312 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 422 - Graphic Design Thesis

    (3cr) In this course, students propose and complete a semester-long, self-authored project. The final solution should be a compelling, finely crafted design deliverable that demonstrates conceptual understanding, technical and contemporary awareness, and the ability to conduct and use research effectively. Students are expected to showcase this work as part of an exhibition.  Previously titled Art Direction. Prerequisites: GRDS 312 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 430 - Advanced Design

    (3 cr) Projects in Advanced Design demand extensive research, analysis, and creative conceptualization. Students are expected to address design problems at various scales and generate solutions that consider its physical, social, cultural, technological, and economic effect. Prerequisites: GRDS 312 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 432 - Design Practicum

    (3 cr) This course provides real world experience in the graphic design field. Students will be involved in a full design experience including client interaction, project management, design, presentation, and production. This course may require students to collaborate with clients or work with other design students to complete a project. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ART 208 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 452 - Digital Storytelling

    (3 cr) Beginning with an introductory look at traditional sequential illustration and storytelling techniques, this course explores the possibilities inherent in designing narratives using current digital tools and presenting them on a variety of platforms. In addition, the consideration of target audiences and the development of appropriate methods of message delivery will be focuses of the course.  Previously offered as GRDS 440 - Interactive Design (beginning Fall 2005) and GRDS 452 - Interactive Design (beginning Spring 2012). Prerequisites: ART 255 .
  
  •  

    GRDS 460 - Internship in Graphic Design

    (3-6 cr) Internships offer valuable, hands-on experience and provide insight to the demanding expectations of an emerging designer in the field. The knowledge and skills learned in course work is applied to on the job assignments and responsibilities. Internships are strongly encouraged for all students looking to enter the design profession and are usually taken during the junior and senior years of study. The final grade for the course will take into account participation, learning, thoroughness and quality of assignments, and supervisor feedback.  Summer internships are strongly encouraged. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: ART 208  with a grade of C or higher, and a minimum 2.50 GPA.

Health Education

  
  •  

    HLTH 100 - Exercise Leadership

    (3cr) A practical introduction to the skills necessary for students preparing to enter a career in health and fitness.  Students will learn how to supervise exercise programs, teach exercise techniques, prepare and administer group exercise classes, promote healthy lifestyle changes, and motivate participants.
  
  •  

    HLTH 101 - First-Year Experience in Health and Exercise

    (1cr) This course is intended to integrate students into the life and culture of Shepherd University while also preparing them for academic success in health promotion and exercise science. This course will introduce essential skills for successful study, communication, and research in the health sciences and allied health professions.

     

    CORE CODES :  FY

  
  •  

    HLTH 103 - Personal Health

    (3 cr) A study of modern health problems and their solutions. Mental health and stress, drug use and abuse, fitness and nutrition, human sexuality, cancer, cardiovascular disease, environmental health, and the aging process will be discussed.
  
  •  

    HLTH 110 - Wellness in the Workplace

    (3 cr) This introductory course examines the effects of Workplace Health Promotion (WHP) programs, including chemical dependency, exercise, heart disease, stress management, smoking cessation, nutrition and cancer screening on absenteeism, worker productivity and peak performance, worker satisfaction and morale, worker injury and illness, and employer costs.
  
  •  

    HLTH 200 - Health and Wellness

    (3 cr) Examination of activities that help individuals recognize components of lifestyles detrimental to good health, and development of principles and programs to improve quality of life.
  
  •  

    HLTH 203 - Contemporary Health I

    (3 cr) In-depth study of health and health-related issues in contemporary society with attention to mental, physiological, epidemiological, and socio-cultural implications. This course is required for physical education majors seeking a teaching endorsement in health, 5-adult. Prerequisites: GSPE 210 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 204 - Contemporary Health II

    (3cr) This course will provide an in-depth study of health and health-related issues in contemporary society with attention to mental, physiological, epidemiological and socio-cultural implications.  This course is required for Physical Education majors seeking a Teaching endorsement in Health, 5-Adult. Prerequisites: HLTH 203 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 225 - First Aid/CPR

    (3 cr) Provides training to enable laypersons to respond appropriately to emergency situations and teaches skills needed to manage emergency situations until professional personnel arrive. Students will learn to recognize emergencies, make first aid decisions, and provide care with little or no first aid supplies or equipment.
  
  •  

    HLTH 235 - Stress Management

    (3 cr) In-depth study of stress. It includes neuro-hormonal mechanisms of stress, physiology of stress, and stress management techniques. This course will address the impact of stress on the human body and psyche, as well as its influence on health and disease. Traditional and non-traditional stress management techniques will be discussed. This course will explore the physiology of stress, the effects of stress on the mind and body and methods to cope with everyday stressors. This course will also investigate many of the specialized areas of stress including post-traumatic stress syndrome and stresses of special groups such as the elderly, women, children, and ethnic groups. Prerequisites: GSPE 210 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 300 - Substance Use and Abuse

    (3 cr) This course analyzes the psychological, sociological, and pharmacological aspects of drug use, misuse, and abuse.
  
  •  

    HLTH 301 - Health and Safety in the Elementary School

    (3 cr) Prepares elementary education majors to teach health and safety in an elementary school. Students will study the teacher’s role, nature of children in grades K-6, planning and demonstration of teaching methods.
  
  •  

    HLTH 310 - Health and Physical Education for Elementary Educators

    (3 cr) This course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills of elementary educators to provide instruction in health and physical education. The course will focus on instruction of fundamental movement patterns, skill development for games and activities, promotion of lifetime enjoyment of physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention, health literacy, the influence of culture and media, communication skills, and goal setting and decision making. The course includes an elementary school practicum and will provide opportunities to plan and demonstrate various instructional techniques, integrate health and physical education across the curriculum, and demonstrate alternative methods of content delivery. Students will develop technology skills to deliver health education and physical education instruction and reinforce classroom experience and learning.  Previously offered as 4 credits.

     

  
  •  

    HLTH 320 - Human Sexuality

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of sexuality across the lifespan with attention to psychological, physiological, ethical, and socio-cultural implications. This course is required for physical education majors seeking a teaching endorsement in Health, K-Adult. Prerequisites: HLTH 103  or HLTH 204 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 350 - Research in Health and Exercise

    (3 cr) This course will present the fundamentals of research design, methods, and ethics for the health and exercise sciences with emphasis on the application of scientific principles to problem solving and inquiry.  Topics of discussion will include classic and current research themes as well as a basic introduction to scientific writing and research publication.

    CORE CODES :  WM

  
  •  

    HLTH 360 - Health in the Schools

    (3 cr) This course will introduce health and physical education students to the Comprehensive School Health concept and model.  This course will also discuss risk behaviors of school students, the coordinated school/community health program, health resources, health curriculum in schools, and health education instructional strategies and technologies. Offered every fall semester. Prerequisites: GSPE 210 , HLTH 103 , or HLTH 204 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 370 - Community Health Education

    (3 cr) An overview of institutional health agencies and organizations, both official and nonofficial, at local, state, and national levels. Exploration of both purpose and function of agencies and institutions for promoting, maintaining, and meeting the health needs of community members. Emphasis on health care, environmental concerns, health legislation, and health insurance. Consumer health choices, advertising, and watchdog agencies will be discussed. Prerequisites: HLTH 103  or HLTH 204 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 375 - Applied Anatomy and Physiology

    (3cr) An exploration of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on developing an understanding of the interrelationships of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in both health and disease. Organ systems covered include the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and endocrine. This course emphasizes both the acute response to exercise and the long term adaptations associated with training. Prior to Fall 2013, offered at 4 cr with a lab component.  Beginning Fall 2013, was Exercise Physiology, 3cr. Prior to Fall 2019, numbered PHED 370. Prerequisites: HLTH 225 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 390 - Exercise Prescription

    (4cr) Provides basic skills and knowledge necessary in assessment of an individual’s health status and teaches students to prescribe fitness programs for lifestyle enhancement. Students will complete a one hour lab portion for successful completion of this course.  Prior to Fall 2019, offered at 3cr. Prerequisites: HLTH 225 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 391 - Worksite Health Promotion

    (3 cr) This course will concentrate on the identification, assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of worksite health promotion. Students will have the opportunity to develop a worksite health promotion (wellness) program. Prerequisites: HLTH 204 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 400 - Exercise for Special Populations

    (3cr) An introduction to the basic skills and knowledge required to safely prescribe and administer health and fitness programs in special populations.  Examples of populations covered include those with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and arthritis, as well as pregnant women, youth, and the elderly. Prerequisites: HLTH 390 
  
  •  

    HLTH 405 - Applied Kinesiology

    (3 cr) Study of the musculoskeletal system and its relationship to human movement. Students will identify anatomical and mechanical features of major joints of the body as well as muscles that operate them and how they interact to complete a motor skill. Previously numbered PHED 405. Prerequisites: HLTH 225 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 420 - Issues in Drug Addiction

    (3 cr) This course is designed to increase knowledge of substance abuse issues. It should be of special interest to law enforcement personnel, probation officers, teachers, counselors working in this field, and University students.
  
  •  

    HLTH 432 - Special Methods of Teaching Health Education in the Elementary and Secondary Schools

    (3 cr) Designed to develop effective and current instructional strategies for elementary and secondary health education teachers. This course must be taken prior to student teaching.  Previously offered as EDUC 432. Prerequisites: Minimum of 20 credits from courses required in teaching field.  Admission to Teacher Education program. Corequisite: EDUC 370  or EDUC 443 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 450 - Health and Exercise Internship

    (9cr) The internship provides supervised career-related experience in a relevant area of health and/or exercise. The student must complete a minimum of 400 contact hours in a setting that utilizes the skills and knowledge required in the health and exercise professions. Prerequisites: All courses with in the major completed, and permission of instructor.

    CORE CODES :   CP

  
  •  

    HLTH 465 - Essentials of Strength and Conditioning

    (3 cr) Class provides an understanding of teaching and demonstrating fitness and wellness activities. The focus will be on advanced principals of training, speed, ability, balance, CV endurance, and polymeric. Students will also gain an understanding of exercise sciences, theoretical practices, nutrition, testing protocols, program design, and administration. This class may be used as preparation of certification exam. Previously numbered RECR 465. Prerequisites: Senior standing, have taken or concurrently taking Applied Anatomy and Physiology, or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    HLTH 468 - Principles of Sports Nutrition

    (3 cr) Basic scientific principles as they apply to sports nutrition to maintain health and human performance will be reviewed. Concentration will be on the nutrient requirement of the athlete through the training, competitive, and rehabilitative phases. Biochemical functions and interrelationships of nutrients are examined. Current nutritional trends are evaluated. Special application is made for the age, gender, and type of training of the athlete. Prerequisites: GSPE 210 , HLTH 300 , or permission of the instructor.

Health Education (Graduate)

  
  •  

    HLTH 599 - Special Topics: Health

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of health.
 

Page: 1 <- 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 -> 18