Jan 29, 2023  
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Physics

  
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    PHYS 330 - Advanced Laboratory

    (2 cr) A series of laboratory experiments in electricity, magnetism, mechanics, and modern physics. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 221 , 222  .
  
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    PHYS 401 - Special Projects

    (1 cr each) Experimental and theoretical research projects in specific areas of physics. Project assignment dependent upon student’s ability and interest.
  
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    PHYS 404 - Special Projects

    (1 cr each) Experimental and theoretical research projects in specific areas of physics. Project assignment dependent upon student’s ability and interest.

Political Science

  
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    PSCI 100 - Politics and Government

    (3 cr) A consideration of concepts and issues essential to the understanding and study of politics. Classical and modern theories of the political system, including communism, fascism, democracy, and socialism are examined in an American and international context including study of specific nations. The approach of this course will be both empirical and normative.

     :   SO   GL

  
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    PSCI 101 - American Federal Government

    (3 cr) A study of the functions and administration of the government of the United States.

     :   SO   CK

  
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    PSCI 150 - First Year Seminar

    (1cr) This course is intended to integrate students into the life and culture of Shepherd University (as do all FYEX courses) and to the Political Science department, as well as to prepare them with the foundations for academic success in the liberal arts and in the social sciences. Topics covered include familiarity with the field of Political Science, faculty and research conducted in the department, social science methodology, career options in the field, and healthy living for a successful university experience. In this seminar course, students will also be prepared for a successful academic career through the cultivation of valued skills such as critical reading and analysis, writing and discussion, and argument and debate.

    CORE CODES :  FY

  
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    PSCI 200 - American Political Institutions

    (3cr) An introductory course for majors and minors. Provides in-depth exploration of the major dimensions of American government. Examines in detail the philosophical underpinnings of the American system of government, the meaning of federalism, the roles and responsibilities of the three branches of government, and the key provisions of the Constitution of the United States. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 210 - Conduct of Political Inquiry I

    (3 cr) Introduction to research methods and their application to the study of politics. Topics include epistemology, methodology, research question formation, literature review, research design, information literacy, and sampling.  A central focus of the course is on learning to effectively evaluate the large amounts of information presented to us in daily life. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 211 - Conduct of Political Inquiry II

    (4cr) Continued exploration of research methods and their application to the study of politics. Topics include qualitative case study analysis, interpretive analysis, survey construction and analysis, document analysis, and basic statistical applications. A central focus of the course is on learning to evaluate effectively the large amounts of information presented to us in daily life. Previously offered at 3cr. Prerequisites: PSCI 210  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 212 - Qualitative Methods

    (3cr) Introduction to qualitative research methodology and methods and their application to the study of politics. Topics include history of social science research; research design; data generation through semi-structured and unstructured interviewing, participant observation, and archival work; methods of interpretation; evaluation of qualitative research; and policy relevance of qualitative research. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 300 - State and Local Government

    (3 cr) A study of the functions and administration of the government on the state and county levels. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.

    CORE CODES :   SO   CK

  
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    PSCI 301 - Public Policy

    (3 cr) Study of public policy development and implementation in the United States, with emphasis on the ways in which cultural, political, and institutional factors may inhibit or expedite pursuit of public policies designed to meet societal needs and with consideration of selected contemporary issues of public policy within this framework. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 302 - Intro to Political Theory

    (3 cr) A survey course that provides a broad-based introduction to political theory and philosophy, ranging from Plato to Rawls.  Particular emphasis is placed on the tension between the authority of government and the freedom of individuals, as well as the role this conflict plays in the organizing of governments. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 303 - Introduction to Public Administration

    (3 cr) An introductory study of the development, organization, procedures, processes, and human relations factors in governmental administration. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of administrative practices in the federal, state, and local governments in the United States. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 304 - Intro to Comparative Politics

    (3 cr) An introduction to one of political science’s major sub-fields–Comparative Politics.  This course focuses on the systematic relationship between social, economic, and political variables across the globe (although country-specific material is widely cited).  Students will be exposed to research strategies, techniques, and terminology used by those in this discipline. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 305 - U.S. Congress

    (3 cr) Study of the United States Congress focusing on constitutional powers, theories of representation, and the electoral process. Legislative decision making and the influences upon it are demonstrated and experienced by students in a semester-long simulation of the legislative process. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 306 - Introduction to Political Communication

    (3cr) A broad introduction to the communication techniques and strategies that allow policy advocates, campaign executives, public relations officers, political consultants and other political professionals to create, shape, and distribute messages that can influence the political process. Areas of study include election campaigns, government operations, media content, and communication processes with a particular focus on the comparison between traditional media and social media platforms and management of communications in today’s 24-hour news cycle. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 307 - The U.S. Presidency

    (3 cr) Study of the U.S. presidency, focusing on constitutional powers, the processes of the presidency, and presidential behavior. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 310 - Parties, Politics, and Elections

    (3 cr) An examination of elections in the United States. Includes consideration of the role of political parties, the media, polling, interest groups, and professional consultants. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 312 - Public Opinion and Political Behavior

    (3 cr) An exploration of the role of public opinion, or the public will, in representative democracy. Topics include opinion formation and measurement, political knowledge, partisanship and ideology, attitude stability and change, the impact of public opinion on political behavior, and the relationship between elite and mass opinion. Particular emphasis is placed on an evaluation of the extent to which the public will is translated into governmental action within the political system. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101 ; and MATH 314 , BADM 224 , PSYC 250 , or PSCI 211 ; or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 315 - Early Political Theory

    (3 cr) A general survey of leading theories from ancient times to the 16th century. Includes an opportunity to study the influence of political and social ideas upon the fundamental institutions of modern societies. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 316 - Recent and Contemporary Political Theory

    (3 cr) The recent schools of political thought are presented with particular emphasis on the basic ideologies of the contemporary period. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 320 - American Judicial Process

    (3 cr) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the American judicial process. Topics to be covered include basic legal concepts, civil law procedures, and criminal law procedures. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 324 - International Relations

    (3 cr) Surveys the political relationships among states, emphasizing the methods and goals of diplomacy; analyzes concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, and the peaceful settlements of disputes. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 350 - Debate and Forensics

    (3cr) The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and preparation essential for Debate and Forensics competitions. As well, students will learn about the various Debate and Forensic Events as well as the nuances associated with competing in the various categories. Students will then be required to select which events they will participate in, which include Debate Events (e.g., Lincoln-Douglas, Policy, or Parliamentary), Individual Events (e.g., Informative, Persuasive, Extemporaneous, After-Dinner or Impromptu Speaking as well as Dramatic, Poetry or Prose Interpretation), or other Events (Improvisational Duo, Dramatic Duo). Students are also required to provide the content necessary for their events and to deliver their performance pieces in front of the class, are required to provide written versions of their pieces prior to oral delivery, and must also provide detailed feedback to their peers during class meetings. Over the course of the semester, students will refine their performance pieces in anticipation of tournament competition. This course is open to all majors.

    CORE CODES :     HM     CK

      This course is repeatable to a maximum of 12 credits.

  
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    PSCI 351 - Model United Nations

    (3cr) This course is designed for students who are interested in learning and understanding international organization and participating in competitive intercollegiate Model United Nations. This course orients students with the history, structure, and function of the United Nations as well as the diplomacy, history, economy, and foreign policy of an assigned country. This course will assist students in their preparation for a Model United Nations conference during the spring semester. Participation in Model UN conferences is serious business which requires excellent research, college level writing, and public speaking skills, as well as negotiation and diplomatic skills. Preparation, cooperation, and commitment to the course and the team are a major aspect of this class. Open to all majors. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 12 credits.
  
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    PSCI 400 - The Supreme Court and Constitutional Law

    (3 cr) Examines the Supreme Court as a legal and political decision-making body; analyzes the development of the American constitutional system, the evolution of fundamental doctrines in constitutional law, and the nature of Supreme Court opinions; relates Supreme Court decisions to contemporary political, social, and economic problems. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 401 - Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

    (3 cr) Examines Supreme Court cases and doctrines on freedom of speech, press and association, on race and sex discrimination, on privacy, on protection of criminal defendants, and on related questions; emphasizes recent decisions and ongoing development of guidelines and doctrines by the present Court; relates constitutional issues to political issues involving civil rights and civil liberties. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 402 - Jurisprudence: the Philosophy of Law

    (3 cr) A consideration of various philosophical problems and moral dilemmas in the law. Includes study of different legal theories and traditions. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  and sophomore standing; or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 404 - International Organization of World Governments

    (3 cr) Examines the theory and structure of international organizations with special emphasis on the U.N.; other organizations to be discussed include NATO, the European Community, OAS, and other regional organizations. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 405 - International Political Economy

    (3 cr) A theory-intensive study of todays increasingly interdependent and politicized global economy. Introduces students to the main institutions and actors in the international system. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 406 - American Foreign Policy Since World War II

    (3 cr) An analysis of American foreign policy since 1945. Special emphasis is placed on the Cold War rivalry between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. Recent developments will also be treated. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 407 - Introduction to International Law

    (3 cr) A survey of the nature, sources, and development of international law. Study of substantive elements through case studies will be stressed. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 408 - Global Problems

    (3 cr) A general survey of the major political problems confronting the world today. Explores the nature and complexities of the problems and how to address them. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 409 - Topics in Constitutional Law

    (3cr) Examines different themes in U.S. constitutional law. The particular emphasis of the course will vary from semester to semester. Topics and issues addressed may include the religion clauses, free expression, privacy and equal protection, and due process and the rights of the accused. Students may take this course up to four times for credit (maximum 12 credits) so long as the topic is different. Students may not take the identical topic more than once for credit. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 410 - Political Ethics

    (3 cr) An examination of some contemporary issues of power, freedom, obligation, human rights, and community, in the light of major philosophical understandings of ethical behavior in the public sphere. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 411 - The Politics of Poverty

    (3 cr) This course examines the variety, extent, and causes of poverty especially in the United States, the relationship of poverty to societal values, the political situation of the poor, and various policy responses. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.

     

  
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    PSCI 412 - Metropolitan Politics

    (3 cr) An examination of local government in metropolitan areas; emphasis is placed on economic, demographic, and political characteristics of the urban community and their implications for effective and responsive government. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 415 - Politics and Civil Rights

    (3 cr) This course examines the politics of the African-American civil rights struggle with an emphasis on the years 1960 through 1965. The latter is often thought of as the high point of success for the Second Reconstruction. The course is divided into three major sections: 1) an overview of the politics of civil rights from the end of the Civil War through the Eisenhower administration; 2) the Kennedy-Johnson presidencies; and 3) a very brief overview of the post-Johnson years, with an emphasis on the changes that have occurred in political party strategies and public opinion as they effect and are effected by African-American civil rights. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 416 - Race, Gender, and Politics

    (3 cr) The purpose of this course will be to acquaint the student with political issues that are related to race and gender. Historic, economic, legal, and ideological context will be presented. Individuals, groups, and government responses will be examined, as well as how similar issues are viewed differently in various cultures and political situations. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 417 - International Development

    (3cr) International development is one of the basic issues in international politics. Every country is in one way or another developing. It seems that the standard for development is set by those countries with the most influence in international politics. However, even those states are constantly trying to improve. Since the standard is set by the Western states, they determine what the basic issues are for development. The question is whether those standards make sense for other countries as well. It often means that development is defined in terms of economics and politics. There are many other issues one could look at to determine the level of development. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 418 - Social Science Fiction

    (3cr) We live in an increasingly interconnected world where difference flourishes–different religions, different political ideologies, different values, different cultures, different customs, different skin colors, different nationalities, different social and economic classes, different genders, different languages and accents are all part of daily life. What happens when we come into contact with others who believe, act, and appear different than ourselves? This course explores some of the sociopolitical dynamics of that encounter. Through a combination of exemplary social scientific writings and science fiction, this course examines various ways humans define in politically consequential terms “who we are” and “how we shall act” in the face of difference. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 419 - International Politics of Human Rights

    (3cr) International Politics of Human Rights is a course designed to give students an introduction to human rights as a philosophical concept, a part of international law, and a subject of international politics. The history of human rights as a philosophy goes back to ancient times, and it has become an issue of contention in politics ever since. With the inclusion of human rights in the body of international law and the consequent drive for implementation, monitoring, and enforcement of these laws, the international politics over the issues have intensified. In this course, both theoretical and practical aspects of the international politics of human rights will be addressed, including case studies and a project in which students will have to apply the knowledge they obtained in the course by designing a grassroots action on an international human rights situation. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 420 - Critical Political Issues

    (3 cr) Detailed exploration of critical issues like abortion rights, gun control, and affirmative action helps students understand and evaluate fundamental questions about policy making and the policy process in American government. Themes of the course include questions of power, checks and balances among the three branches of American government, the legitimacy of policy outcomes in the area of social regulatory policy, and the obstacles to collective action in the political realm. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 421 - Politics and Film

    (3cr) This course examines the role of how American politics is viewed through fictional portrayals as well as the burgeoning documentary genre. For decades now, Hollywood has increasingly relied on Washington DC and the political scene for movie fodder. In this vein, it is important to clarify this relationship and to better understand how movies help us relate to ourselves as citizens, to politics, political actors, and key issues. We will touch on a number of relevant topics including, but not limited to: how these films portray the need for government, how films illustrate key political institutions, and how the various governmental branches shape policymaking and politics. We will rely on both written materials and movies over the past few decades to answer these questions. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 422 - American Political Thought

    (3 cr) A study of the growth and development of American political concepts from the Colonial period to the present. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 423 - Topics in Political Communication

    (3cr) Examines different themes in political and strategic communications with the specialized component of “political practitioners in the classroom,” where policy and political practitioners are invited to lecture and engage with students during regular class sessions. The particular emphasis of the course will vary from semester to semester. Students may take this course up to three times for credit (maximum 9 credits) so long as the topic is different. Students may not take the identical topic more than once for credit. Prerequisites: PSCI 306  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 425 - Readings in Political Science

    (3 cr) An examination of a selected topic in political science devoted to extensive reading of classic, standard, and/or contemporary monographs, articles, and/or books. Specific topic and presiding professor will be announced prior to the registration period. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 426 - Comparative Government: Western Europe

    (3 cr) A comparative study of modern political institutions with particular attention to European government and politics. (Was PSCI 325) Prerequisites: PSCI 304   or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 427 - Comparative Government: Soviet Union and Its Aftermath

    (3 cr) An examination of the U.S.S.R. as a 20th-century political phenomenon, with emphasis on the political concepts it typified—including revolution, Communism, and one-party rule. Explores the dynamics of political change in Russia and other former Soviet Republics. (Was PSCI 327) Prerequisites: PSCI 304   or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 428 - Comparative Government: Asia

    (3 cr) An examination of the governments of China, Japan, and Korea including their ideology, culture, theory, institutions, leadership, and politics, as well as their relations with other countries, will be explored.  (Was PSCI 328) Prerequisites: PSCI 304   or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 429 - Comparative Politics of the Middle East

    (3 cr) Examines the politics of the Middle East from a historical perspective. Provides a basic understanding of the political forces, figures, and events that have shaped the region throughout its long history.  (Was PSCI 329) Prerequisites:    or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 430 - Democratization

    (3cr) This course is designed to introduce students to the extensive literature on democratization in comparative politics. The resurgence of democracy in Latin America, Eastern Europe, and other regions has sparked significant political science research attempting to understand the factors that create, sustain, and institutionalize democratic governance. This course will analyze the major approaches and the critical issues that form the democratization literature in comparative politics. Rather than drawing upon one particular region, this course is organized thematically and draws upon the experiences of Latin American, Southern European, and the post-communist states. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 431 - Security and Insecurity in World Politics

    (3cr) Surveys Security Studies, a subfield of International Relations. Topics include the discussion of various theories like realism, liberalism, feminism, human security, and constructivism. We also cover a number of security-related issues in world politics like great power struggles, cooperation among states, identity politics, and the environment. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 432 - Evolution of European Government and Society

    (3cr) This is a study abroad course that features an in-depth focus on European Governmental and Non-Governmental decision-making and organizations, both from a contemporary and historical perspective. A major focus will be on understanding the workings of NATO and the European Union. The course also looks at Europe in the context of trends of globalization, localization and human rights. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 433 - Terrorism

    (3cr) A survey of the literature on terrorism with an emphasis on the various causes and consequences of terrorism; the study of terrorism as a social network; the social construction of terrorism; state terrorism; and the experience of becoming a terrorist. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 442 - Political Communication Internship

    (3-15cr) This course provides full- or part-time work experience in federal, state, or local agencies; with election campaigns at all levels; in trade and policy organizations that are active in the public sector; or in other appropriate placements. The goal is to enable the student to gain practical knowledge and experience in creating, shaping, and distributing messages to influence the political process. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisites: PSCI 306  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 443 - Internship in Government

    (1-15) This course provides full- or part-time work experience in federal, state, or local agencies; in private trade and policy organizations that are active in the public sector; or in other appropriate placements. The goal is to enable the student to gain practical knowledge of political processes, public administration, or the formation and implementation of public policy. Interns must have a 2.5 GPA, must complete half of the 128 credits required for graduation before the internship begins, must submit applications to the department early in the semester preceding the internship, and must follow the department’s norms and procedures for internships. A copy of the norms and procedures is available from the department chair or from the department’s coordinator of internship programs. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 444 - Practicum: Public Policy and Administration

    (3 cr) This course is a form of independent study that integrates lessons learned in the classroom with supervised work experience in government. Students will be afforded the opportunity to attend seminars conducted by the Eastern Management Development Center and to work at the center. Written reports will be required as part of this class. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 495 - Political Science Capstone

    (3 cr) A culminating experience in political science, this course gives the advanced undergraduate student an opportunity to explore and integrate the knowledge learned in individual courses covering many other areas of content, as well as providing an in-depth exploration of political science values and ethics, as well as of the writing process. All students will complete a substantial research paper, which may be based upon a prior internship/co-op, service learning, or study abroad experience, or upon an individualized research experience during the course of the capstone semester. A formal public presentation of the research paper is also a requirement of this course. Prerequisites: Senior majors only.  Requires a C or better in PSCI 211 .

    CORE CODE:   WM   CP


Political Science (Graduate)

  
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    PSCI 575 - The Policy and Politics in Education

    (3 cr) A study of: (1) the ways in which American society makes choices about matters of importance that affect the whole society, (2) the linkage between politics, policies, and American values, and (3) how policy is implemented and evaluated. Models of policy formation are examined and applied to current issues, especially in the field of education.
  
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    PSCI 599 - Special Topics: Political Science

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of political science.
  
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    PSCI 699 - Special Topics: Political Science

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of political science.

Psychology

  
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    PSYC 101 - Introduction to Psychology

    (3 cr) A survey course introducing the core areas of psychology, including biopsychology, learning and memory, intelligence, developmental psychology, stress and health, personality, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, and social psychology.

      :  MD  SO   FY (designated majors-only sections) 

  
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    PSYC 102 - Intro to the Psyc Major

    (1cr) In informal discussions, students will learn how to successfully navigate the Psychology major, meet members of the Psychology faculty, and begin to learn how to think like a psychological scientist. Prerequisite/corequisite: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 211 - Faculty-Led Research

    (1-3cr) This course provides students with hands-on research experience in psychology. Students apply previous course content to and actively assist in various aspects of faculty-led research. Faculty-student interaction is central to the experience. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 101  and permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 250 - Statistics for the Social Sciences

    (4 cr) Descriptive and inferential statistics in the design, analysis, and interpretation of social science research with practical application using computers in the laboratory. The statistical methods to be covered include frequency distributions and graphing, measures of central tendency, measures of variability and correlations, t-tests, analysis of variance, and several distribution-free tests. Prerequisites: MATH 101 MATH 105 , MATH 108 , MATH 109 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 251 - Research Methods in Psychology

    (3 cr) This course is an overview of research design in psychology. Topics covered include research ethics, reliability, and validity of psychological measures, observational and survey methods, quasiexperimental designs, and experimental design and control. Prerequisite/corequisite: PSYC 250 Please note that the Psychology Department advises students to complete PSYC 250 before enrolling in PSYC 251.
  
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    PSYC 270 - Well-Being and Happiness

    (3cr) What does it take to achieve and sustain well-being and happiness? Research in the field of Positive Psychology has shed some light on this age-old question. This course will explore theories of psychological well-being and its components, including happiness, and the scientific evidence for those theories. It will examine research that suggests ways to build habits that can amplify happiness, resilience, and postiive relationships. May include a service learning requirement. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .

    CORE CODES :    WE 

  
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    PSYC 305 - Social Psychology

    (3 cr) A study of the interaction of individuals in group situations, the products of collective activity, and their influence upon the individual.  Previously numbered PSYC 405. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 309 - Abnormal Psychology

    (3 cr) This course takes an integrative approach to the understanding of psychological disorders, exploring biological, psychological, and social influences and their interaction. Scientifically grounded methods of assessment and treatment are emphasized and cultural differences in psychological difficulties and their treatment will also be discussed. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 310 - Psychology of Personality

    (3 cr) This course reviews classical and contemporary theories of personality in some depth by evaluating each theory on its scientific and philosophical merits, as well as on its utility in application in clinical, educational, and business settings.  Previously numbered PSYC 410. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 311 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology

    (3 cr) An introduction to theoretical systems and approaches to the prevention and treatment of psychological difficulties, with an emphasis on empirically supported interventions. Prerequisites: PSYC 309 .
  
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    PSYC 312 - Research Practicum

    (3 cr) This course provides students with hands-on research experience in psychology. Students apply previous course content to take a leading role in a research project in collaboration with a faculty member. Faculty-student interaction is central to the experience. Previously titled Practicum in Psychology I. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    PSYC 313 - Clinical Practicum

    (3 cr) Clinical Practicum is an undergraduate-level internship in Psychology. It provides supervised field experience (approximately 12 hours/week) in clinical/counseling and other human service settings, enabling students to integrate theory and practice. A variety of community-based organizations are used for student placement; students will need to have a car or arrange for transportation. This experience is supported by a weekly discussion/content seminar related to paraprofessional work in psychology. Previously titled Practicum in Psychology II. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    PSYC 315 - Psychological Tests and Measurements

    (3 cr) This course is a survey of the psychological instruments available for the measurement of human behavior, beliefs, and attitudes.  Previously numbered PSYC 415. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 316 - Art Therapy

    (3 cr) An introduction to therapeutic techniques using artistic productions as an aid to psychotherapy. The course involves an analysis of approaches with specific clinical populations; e.g., juvenile delinquents, geriatric clients, etc. This course also includes a historical and theoretical appraisal of the use of art therapy in both clinical practice and research. Prerequisites: PSYC 309  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    PSYC 320 - Human Sexual Behavior

    (3 cr) A course designed to investigate the scope of intrapersonal and interpersonal human sexual behavior. A psychological approach is emphasized, examining the acquisition of sexual scripts through learning, varieties of sexual experience, both typical and atypical, and the psychodynamics of sexual adjustment. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 321 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    (3 cr) The application of psychological theory and methodology to individuals and groups in organizational settings. Topics include managerial appraisal and consultation, employee training and development, personnel research, improving employee relations, and designing optimal work environments. Prerequisites: PSYC 101  or BADM 310 .
  
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    PSYC 325 - Health Psychology

    (3 cr) This course explores contemporary trends and techniques in the field of health psychology. Included are such topics as psychological intervention in physical illness, adherence, activity level, obesity, smoking prevention, acute and chronic stress, stress appraisal, delay in seeking treatment, immunological competence, interventions with children, lifestyle change programs, holistic psychology, and the health care system. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 326 - Psychology of Substance Abuse

    (3 cr) The focus of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of the nature of addiction to various psychoactive substances and its treatment. This includes a study of the psychological and social factors associated with substance abuse and theories of etiology, along with an understanding of the scope of services and critical issues in services for persons with psychoactive substance use disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 331 - Counseling Children

    (3 cr) This course focuses on the main components of an elementary school counseling program: counseling (both individual and small group), class guidance, and consultation. Included is information about how to use a variety of counseling techniques, an overview of relevant counseling approaches, childhood social-emotional developmental issues and situational concerns, evaluation and treatment planning, and legal and ethical issues specific to the elementary counseling setting. Prerequisites: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    PSYC 340 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology

    (3 cr) This course consists of an introduction to the scientific study of human development over the lifespan. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 341 - Child Development

    (3 cr) This course provides an overview of child development from the prenatal period through middle childhood. It explores the major developmental theories and scientific research findings as they apply to physical, cognitive, social, and emotional perspectives of human development. The relationship between the individual and the environment, especially the influence of one’s culture, will be studied.  Previously titled Infant/Child Development. Prerequisites: PSYC 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 342 - Adolescent Development

    (3 cr) Designed for those with a professional interest in adolescence. Course content emphasizes cognitive, physical, and psychosocial-affective variables which affect adolescent development. Prerequisites: PSYC 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 343 - Psychology of Aging

    (3 cr) This course explores both the physiological and psychosocial correlates of the aging process. Topics include the sensory-motor, hormonal, biochemical, nutritional, and neurological aspects of aging; factors related to substance abuse, memory loss, attention deficits, delirium, and dementia; and key factors in the mental health of the elderly. Consideration is also given to cultural and social-political aspects of aging, as well as death and the process of dying. Prerequisites: PSYC 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 361 - Biopsychology

    (3 cr) This course involves a study of structure and function of the nervous system. Students will gain an appreciation for the biological basis of everyday behaviors and an understanding of the physiological correlates of many types of psychological pathology.  Previously numbered PSYC 461; also previously named Survey of Physiological Psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 365 - Drugs and the Brain

    (3 cr) Psychopharmacology is the study of drugs that influence mood and behavior. This course will address principles of drug action, basic physiological mechanisms by which psychoactive drugs work, drugs used to treat mental/emotional/neurological disorders, and drugs of abuse. Social issues surrounding drugs will be only briefly discussed, as it is most important to understand drug mechanisms and effects before forming opinions on social policy. Students will be required to write a research paper on a topic of interest to them within the field. Previously titled Psychopharmacology. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 367 - Social Perception

    (3 cr) Social perception is the process in which people form impressions of individuals. This course examines that process by exploring the array of information people use in impression formation and management including, but not limited to, attitudes, emotions, mood biases, and other environmental factors. Assorted social perception theories, relevant research, and real-world applications are also discussed through the course. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 370 - Sensation and Perception

    (3 cr) Sensation and perception is the subfield of psychology that examines how elemental stimuli in the environment (e.g., light) are translated into a complex psychological phenomenon (e.g., perception of color). All five sensory modalities (vision, audition, olfaction, gustation, and tactile/ body senses) will be addressed. Physiology of the sensory systems and theories of perception are the major thrust of this course. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 370L - Sensation and Perception Laboratory

    (1 cr) PSYC 370L is the laboratory course that accompanies PSYC 370. It is designed to give students hands-on experience and training in conducting psychological research. Students will conduct experiments, analyze data, interpret results, and write lab reports using standard APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 250 , PSYC 251  and ENGL 102 . Prerequisite/corequisite: PSYC 370 .
  
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    PSYC 371 - Memory and Cognition

    (3 cr) An introduction to human cognitive processes including attention, perception, memory, concept formation, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. Course emphasizes the role of experimentation in understanding the information processing systems underlying human cognition, language, and memory. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 371L - Memory and Cognition Laboratory

    (1 cr) PSYC 371L is the laboratory course that accompanies PSYC 371. It is designed to give students hands-on experience and training in conducting psychological research. Students will conduct experiments, analyze data, interpret results, and write lab reports using standard APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 250 , PSYC 251  and ENGL 102 . Prerequisite/corequisite: PSYC 371 .
  
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    PSYC 372 - Psychology of Learning

    (3 cr) A survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations in human and animal learning, including such topics as classical and operant conditioning, animal cognition, and machine learning. The course also covers discrimination, generalization, and the role of reward, punishment, and other motivational variables in learning. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 372L - Learning Laboratory

    (1 cr) PSYC 372L is the laboratory course that accompanies PSYC 372. It is designed to give students hands-on experience and training in conducting psychological research. Students will conduct experiments, analyze data, interpret results, and write lab reports using standard APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 250 , PSYC 251  and ENGL 102 . Prerequisite/corequisite: PSYC 372 
  
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    PSYC 381 - Sport Psychology

    (3 cr) This course is designed for students interested in learning theoretical as well as practical information as it relates to the psychology of sport. This class will introduce students to the areas of sport psychology and health psychology. Students will be presented with a number of effective mental training exercises that will help to enhance one’s level of athletic performance. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 382 - Humanistic Psychology

    (3 cr) An exploration of the field of humanistic psychology. The theoretical orientations of selected humanistic psychologists (e.g., Carl Rogers, Leo Buscaglia, Viktor Frankl, Harold Greenwald, and Abraham Maslow) are covered in depth.  Previously numbered PSYC 430. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
  
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    PSYC 392 - Cooperative Education in Psychology

    (1-9 cr) Cooperative education is a form of education which integrates classroom study with paid, planned, and supervised work experiences in the public and privates sectors. Cooperative education allows students to acquire essential, practical skills by being exposed to the reality of the work world beyond the boundaries of campus, enhancing their self-confidence and career direction. An agreement is signed by the employer supervisor, the faculty supervisor, and the student. The co-op may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; minimum 2.3 GPA, 2.5 major GPA; approval of the Department of Psychology; placement by the Career Center.
  
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    PSYC 404 - Psychology Seminar

    (3 cr) A course designed to serve the needs of students who are majoring or minoring in psychology and who expect to pursue graduate studies in the field. The purpose of this course is to allow faculty to expose students to topics not included in the present curriculum, or topics which, although included, are not covered in sufficient depth for pre-professional students. The seminar may include sharing the results of individually assigned readings, individualized research, and/or a discussion of theoretical or research topics as reported in contemporary literature and chosen by the faculty instructor. Repeatable with different topic, up to 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 420 - History and Systems of Psychology

    (3 cr) An overview of the historical and philosophical basis of psychology and the relationship of contemporary systems. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 .
 

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