Jan 22, 2021  
2019-2020 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Lifetime Fitness Activities

  
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    LFA 175 - Weight Training for Men

    (1cr) This course is designed to introduce lifetime fitness and sports activities that will enhance a student’s life. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness, flexibility, sports fundamentals, skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship will be emphasized.  (Previously numbered GSPE 175)

    Note: There may be a fee associated with some of the activies in this course. 

  
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    LFA 176 - Weight Training for Women

    (1cr) This course is designed to introduce lifetime fitness and sports activities that will enhance a student’s life. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness, flexibility, sports fundamentals, skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship will be emphasized.  (Previously numbered GSPE 176)

    Note: There may be a fee associated with some of the activies in this course. 

  
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    LFA 179 - Wrestling

    (1cr) This course is designed to introduce lifetime fitness and sports activities that will enhance a student’s life. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness, flexibility, sports fundamentals, skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship will be emphasized.  (Previously numbered GSPE 179)

    Note: There may be a fee associated with some of the activies in this course. 

  
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    LFA 180 - Snow Skiing I

    (1cr) This course is designed to introduce lifetime fitness and sports activities that will enhance a student’s life. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness, flexibility, sports fundamentals, skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship will be emphasized.  (Previously numbered GSPE 180)

    Note: There may be a fee associated with some of the activies in this course. 

  
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    LFA 181 - Snow Skiing II

    (1cr) This course is designed to introduce lifetime fitness and sports activities that will enhance a student’s life. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness, flexibility, sports fundamentals, skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship will be emphasized.  (Previously numbered GSPE 181)

    Note: There may be a fee associated with some of the activies in this course. 

  
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    LFA 205 - The Weight Loss Program

    (1cr) This course is designed to introduce lifetime fitness and sports activities that will enhance a student’s life. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness, flexibility, sports fundamentals, skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship will be emphasized.  (Previously numbered GSPE 205)

    Note: There may be a fee associated with some of the activies in this course. 

  
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    LFA 250 - Adult Fitness

    (1cr) This course is designed to introduce lifetime fitness and sports activities that will enhance a student’s life. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness, flexibility, sports fundamentals, skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship will be emphasized.  (Previously numbered GSPE 250)

    Note: There may be a fee associated with some of the activies in this course. 


Master of Business Administration (Graduate)

  
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    MBA 5FDA - Foundations of Accounting

    (3 cr) This is a prerequisite course for  MBA 570 Managerial Accounting  (not all MBA students will need this course, depending on baccalaureate preparation).

    Fundamentals of accounting including basic accounting models, inventory methods, classified statements, negotiable instruments, internal control, accounting for property and equipment, and special journals in conjunction with sole proprietorship. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

  
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    MBA 5FDE - Foundations of Economics

    (3 cr) This is a prerequisite course for MBA 560 Managerial Economics  (not all MBA students will need this course, depending on baccalaureate preparation).

    Introductory survey of modern economic issues.  Economic theory is employed in the analysis of inflation, unemployment, pollution, regulation, market structure, and related topics.  Economic institutions such as corporations, banking, and government are also studied. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

  
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    MBA 5FDS - Foundations of Statistics

    (3 cr) This is a prerequisite course for MBA 509 Statistical Analysis  (not all MBA students will need this course, depending on baccalaureate preparation).

    Methods of collecting, presenting, analyzing, and interpreting business data. Emphasis on the understanding of probability distributions such as the binomial, normal, exponential, and Poisson.  Discussion of regression and correlation, hypothesis testing, chi-square analysis, and one way ANOVA. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

  
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    MBA 500 - Challenges to Modern Business

    (3 cr) An examination of how businesses function in the numerous environments that are in constant change. The political, social, economic, technological, and international environments challenge the various types of businesses from the small business to the large corporation. The course offers possible solutions to the many workplace challenges.
  
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    MBA 501 - Entrepreneurship

    (3cr) This course address the issues faced by those who wish to turn opportunity into viable organizations that create value. While most of the examples in the class will be drawn from new venture formation, the principles also apply to entrepreneurship in corporate settings and to social entrepreneurship. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing, and managing successful new ventures. The emphasis in this course is on applying and synthesizing concepts and techniques from functional areas of strategic management, finance, accounting, marketing, operations management, and organizational behavior in the context of new venture development.
  
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    MBA 502 - Business Law

    (3cr) This course presents business decision-making based on the legal and ethical standards in place in today’s global society. By examining the philosophical, legal, social, historical, and political/economic regulatory environments, this course places business decision making in the legal and ethical realm essential to success in today’s markets.
  
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    MBA 503 - Fundraising and Grant Writing

    (3cr) This course presents the principles, tools, and techniques of fundraising using a marketing foundation and a study of why individuals and corporations donate. It will encompass networking, marketing, leadership, volunteerism, financial management, governance, advocacy, the principles of fundraising, and the tools and techniques to be used in fundraising such as, “the case statement,” grant writing, annual gift campaigns, planned giving, capital campaigns, and special events.
  
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    MBA 504 - Non-profit and Service Marketing

    (3cr) This course concentrates on the differences between the for-profit environment and the non-profit sector, including healthcare, human services, government, religion and utilities. It reviews the traditional elements of marketing and their application in a non-profit/service environment. It concentrates on the intangible aspects and customer focus of service marketing and teaches the tools and strategies needed to succeed in a service industry using a combination of lecture, interactive exercises and guest speakers from local service organizations.
  
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    MBA 505 - Business in West Virginia

    (3 cr) An examination of the businesses that provided the economic staying power for the state of West Virginia over the history of its statehood. The course continues with an examination of the business environment transition from mining and manufacturing to the current service economy.
  
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    MBA 508 - International Business

    (3 cr) This course examines the management challenges associated with entering markets outside the U.S. (or within the U.S. marketing to unique ethnic segments) and maintaining global operations. Topics covered include comparative systems, regional trade blocs, forms of foreign business involvement, international marketing/business tactics, geographic strategies, and functional management of the global enterprise including human resource management issues. Emphasis is given to the mechanics of entering global markets. Case studies are used to identify both unique and universal practices.
  
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    MBA 509 - Statistical Analysis

    (3 cr) Basic statistical skills for advanced work in the functional areas of business administration, including descriptive statistics, probability and its distributions, sampling, and estimation. Prerequisites: Foundational statistics course at the undergraduate or graduate level with a C or better, taken within the last ten years.
  
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    MBA 511 - Health Administration and Strategy

    (3 cr) Examines the structure and functions of the health care industry, the concepts and processes of health illness, the institutional and individual providers of health services, and related concepts. It also focuses on the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategy in health care financing of organizations. The course emphasizes concepts dealing with health programs to sustain competitive advantage.
  
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    MBA 512 - Healthcare Policy

    (3cr) Focuses on the current health policy and political ideology as they impact care in health organizations. The impact of national and state health policy decisions on clinical and managerial processes and outcomes are explored. Previously titled Health Policy and Law.
  
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    MBA 513 - Health Economics and Finance

    (3 cr) A theoretical and practical study of organizations and functions of health care financial and economic administration. Emphases are on institutional fiscal policies, reimbursement, and internal/external resource limitations/expansion possibilities. Prerequisites: Successful completion of MBA 560  and MBA 570  prior to registering for MBA 513, OR permission of the instructor, OR Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) standing.
  
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    MBA 514 - Healthcare Law

    (3cr) Examines the basic principles and practices of law affecting health facilities and medical practice, patient care and treatment and medical and health employment. Also explores the common ethical situations encountered by healthcare leaders.
  
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    MBA 515 - Introduction to the U S Healthcare System

    (3cr) This is a prerequisite course for all other Health Administration MBA courses. This course introduces the student to the components of the healthcare system in the United States and explores the political and social forces which shape this system. This course may be waived by the Health Administration Program Coordinator if the prospective student holds an undergraduate degree in a clinical discipline or health administration and has substantial work experience in the healthcare field.
  
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    MBA 517 - Human Resources

    (3 cr) A study of manpower planning, recruitment, selection, and development of employees. Examines compensation, employee appraisal, job analysis, collective bargaining, arbitration, and labor relations. Studies how global competition and rapid technological advances accelerate trends such as shared service centers, outsourcing, and just-in-time training. Case studies undertaken.
  
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    MBA 520 - Management, Leadership and Ethics

    (3cr) This advanced course examines the philosophy, theory and practice of managing organizations and their subunits in the context of a rapidly changing environment. Course focus will be upon management and leadership philosophies; the structure, design, and operation of organizations; and the management of individuals within organizations, to include the human resource process.  Topics covered will include leadership, organizational culture, change processes, team building, motivation, decision-making, ethical issues and dilemmas, and diversity. The course will also include a component whereby students will be introduced to the expectations and processes of becoming a scholar in business administration at the graduate level. Previously titled Leadership and Ethics.
  
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    MBA 521 - Sport Management

    (3cr) This course offers students a look at the diverse, expanding field of sport and recreation. Designed to provide a comprehensive look at the basic organizational structures found in the sport industry, this course will examine applications of managerial concepts and processes, and the ways in which organizations interact with each other and with the government. Cross-listed RECR 521 . Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
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    MBA 522 - Sport Marketing and Sales

    (3cr) This course features an in-depth look at the marketing practices, procedures and operations of professional, college and recreational sport organizations and enterprises. Students refine their marketing skills by examining the ways in which sport marketing organizations exercise promotions, marketing research, sponsorships and fund raising in the sport industry. Cross-listed RECR 522 . Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
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    MBA 523 - Sport Law and NCAA Compliance

    (3cr) This course features a presentation of the basic legal system, its terminology, and principles as applied to professional and amateur sport. Emphasis is on identifying and analyzing legal issues, the ramifications of those issues, and the means of limiting the liability of sport organizations.
  
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    MBA 525 - Facility and Event Management

    (3cr) This seminar course is designed to examine principles of facility operations and event management in the sport business industry. A primary focus of this class will be on the applications of facility operations and event management principles to organizations in professional and collegiate sport. Students will analyze complex business challenges and opportunities commonly faced by sport event managers and facility operators, and will develop practical strategies to increase revenue and minimize potential liability exposure when planning and implementing an event at a facility.
  
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    MBA 526 - Professional Sport Field School

    (3cr) A field-experience travel program that gives students a unique hands-on experience in the realm of professional sports organizations. The course is designed to introduce students to the business model of professional sports in the United States, ranging from analytics to budgeting, to  marketing, finance and operations. Students travel to destinations in various regions of the country, including both minor and major league organizations. Students meet with officials from various sport organizations, attend lectures, and participate in organized class discussions, and tour training and sport facilities.

    Following the completion of each Field School, each student is required to submit a detailed research paper, similar to a master’s thesis.

    NOTE: Costs for travel are an additional expense.

  
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    MBA 527 - Olympic/Collegiate Sport Field School

    (3cr) A field-experience travel program that takes students on a seminar through an Olympic Training Center and nearby intercollegiate athletic programs, giving them a unique hands-on experience in socio-political workings of Olympic sporting events and intercollegiate athletics. The course is designed to introduce students to the intricate aspects of international sport management, marketing, and sports law; and to provide students with an understanding of the changing context for sport in a global society. Students meet with officials from various governing bodies, attend lectures, and participate in organized class discussions, and tour training and sport facilities. Representatives from Olympic organizations would be included.

    Following the completion of each Field School, each student would be required to submit a detailed research paper, similar to a master’s thesis.

    NOTE: Costs for travel are an additional expense.

  
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    MBA 528 - International Sport Field School

    (3cr) A study abroad program that takes students on an international seminar, giving them a unique firsthand experience in international sports. The course is designed to introduce students to the European model of sport management, marketing, and sports law; and to provide students an understanding of the changing context for sport in a global society. Participants attend lectures from sport executives, conduct student workshops, participate in organized class discussions, and seminar sport facilities.  The seminar covers various countries.

    Representatives from various international organizations involved in major sports will present a wide range of issues during the program. Topics will include the structure and characteristics of international sports, marketing and management, sports law, professional soccer, the fight against doping in sport, etc. Participants will also meet representatives of some of the International Sport Federations.

    NOTE: Costs for travel are an additional expense.

  
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    MBA 531 - Organizational Development

    (3cr) This course focuses on human behavior in groups and the dynamics that groups produce as they work. Special attention will be directed at exploring the dynamics of planned systemic organizational change, recognizing that even the most carefully designed strategy for planned change can have unexpected contingencies during implementation. We will consider organizational dynamics from two different but interrelated perspectives. We will explore overt group dynamics as it occurs with our conscious awareness. We will also consider the covert component of group dynamics that impacts overt dynamics but occurs at an unconscious level of which we are unaware. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
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    MBA 532 - Project Management

    (3cr) This course covers the process and techniques required to manage many types of projects. The course integrates core management skills acquired throughout the MBA program with specific project management skills and knowledge. By combining skill types, students can more effectively meet project objectives on time and within budget, as well as meet expectations and quality requirements. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques needed to manage projects successfully. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
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    MBA 533 - Public Policy Analysis

    (3cr) This course focuses on the crafting, implementation, and evaluation of public policy in the United States. The institutional milieu of the U.S. government will be discussed along with other factors influential to the policy-making process. Moreover, the majority of the class will examine specific policy areas such as health care, social security, fiscal, monetary, environmental, housing, and foreign policy. The goal of this class is to stimulate both discussion and thought on the part of the students and to help students understand the complexities of these issues. In addition, it is also important for students to understand how these policies affect either today or in the future. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
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    MBA 534 - Public Budgeting and Financial Management

    (3cr) Public Budgeting and Financial Management will survey the major literature, history and figures of public finance, coupled with the politics of budgeting. The class will include the historical development of budgeting in the United States, beginning with the classical period of public administration through the contemporary era. Emphasis will be placed on the differences between public and private sector budgeting and financial management and the political context of the budgeting process. By blending theory and practice, students will be exposed to the many factors of the budgetary process, developing skills that can be directly applied to the workplace. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
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    MBA 540 - Advanced Marketing Theory

    (3 cr) A study of advanced marketing management with emphasis on product, price, promotion, and distribution problem solving. The organizational environment within which marketing problems occur will be explored. Advanced Marketing is a course of study that exposes the marketing practice of organizations in the context of a rapidly changing contemporary environment. The course will weave together a study of classical marketing theory, strategic planning, market research, segmentation, and the marketing mix, as well as the evaluation and control of the marketing plan. In addition, applied cases from each student’s organization, text cases and personal profiles will be integrated with the weekly discussions, all of which will allow students to have a firm grip on foundational marketing management theory in their personal environment.
  
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    MBA 545 - Professional Selling and Sales Management

    (3 cr) The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students to the basic components of both the revenue generation and revenue enhancement processes and how to manage the revenue generation process (sales management). The perspective taken is that of a participant (sales person) for the sales portion of the class and as a sales manager/decision maker in an organization.
  
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    MBA 548 - Select Topics Applied Business I

    (3 cr) The purpose of this unit is to expose practicing sales and marketing professionals in the graduate program to a series of new, academically challenging and pragmatic issues that they can apply in their chosen sales and marketing profession. This is an advanced unit, so it is expected that students will focus on their careers and apply sales and marketing tactics to stand out from the crowd. This unit will utilize a collage of the top academic theorists and professionals to cover the varying issues.
  
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    MBA 549 - Select Topics Applied Business II

    (3 cr) Advanced sales management focuses on the students’ sales management career and applying the theory and techniques to organizations where they are employed. This unit will utilize a collection of the top academic theorists and professionals to cover the differing issues students are expected to master over the semester.
  
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    MBA 550 - Business Analytics

    (3cr) Business decisions require the basic skills of analyzing data to understand the problem more completely and to produce better answers. The business environment uses various tools and techniquest to accomplish this analysis. This course is designed to introduce students to those tools and techniques and how they can be automated.
  
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    MBA 551 - Financial Planning Process, Environment and Applications

    (3cr) This course provides an overview of the financial planning process, starting with the importance of financial planning, the role and responsibilities of a financial planner, effective communication techniques, and covers topics such as risk management, laws and regulatory issues, the role of ethics and the economic environment for financial planning, time-value-of-money concepts, financial decision-making and financial planning applications.
  
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    MBA 560 - Managerial Economics

    (3 cr) The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation in economic principles that affect decisions in business administration. The focus will be on solving problems and analyzing issues and cases that deal with how decisions should be made to achieve the firm’s goals. Prerequisites: Foundational economics course (covering microeconomics or equivalent) at the undergraduate or graduate level with a C or better, taken within the last ten years OR passing economics CLEP test.
  
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    MBA 570 - Managerial Accounting

    (3cr) This course provides a detailed examination of accounting data and concepts for managerial planning and control, including cost accounting and responsibility accounting. Prerequisites: Foundational accounting courses (i.e., Accounting I and II or equivalent) at the undergraduate, or one course at the graduate level, with a C or better, taken within the last ten years; OR passing accounting CLEP test.
  
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    MBA 572 - Personal Financial Planning

    (3 cr) To provide a comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, taxes, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection insurance, retirement planning, and investing.
  
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    MBA 575 - Advanced Auditing

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of the critical judgments and decision-making processes followed by auditing professionals. Students will be exposed to the ethical issues faced by audit practitioners. Through case studies, the student will gain the ability to be more effective in a dynamic audit environment. Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in accounting, or approval from the Chair of the Department of Accounting.
  
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    MBA 576 - Advanced Tax Strategies

    (3 cr) To explore the tax consequences of many sophisticated business, financial, and personal wealth-planning transactions. Each transaction is presented in an economic or legal context, and the non-tax motives of the transacting parties are examined before the tax issues are identified. The discussion of tax issues emphasizes the development and implementation of strategies to make the transactions as tax-efficient as possible to all parties involved. Tax strategies are analyzed in terms of their impact on net cash flows and on the income statements and balance sheets of the parties involved. Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in accounting, or approval from the Chair of the Department of Accounting.
  
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    MBA 577 - Accounting Ethics

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of the ethical issues faced by the accounting professional. Through case studies, the student will gain the ability to analyze the issues faced by the accounting professional and determine why or why not the action taken was appropriate under the circumstances. The student must have a clear understanding of the auditing environment to successfully complete the course assignments. Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in accounting and MBA 575 , or approval from the Chair of the Department of Accounting.
  
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    MBA 579 - Advanced Financial Management

    (3cr) This course will provide students with advanced applications of contemporary finance theory to the solution of management and marketing problems. Prerequisites: Foundational statistics course at the undergraduate or graduate level taken with a C or better, taken within the last ten years AND foundational accounting courses (i.e., Accounting I and II or equivalent) at the undergraduate or one course at the graduate level with a C or better, taken within the last ten years, or passing accounting CLEP test.
  
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    MBA 580 - Introduction to Networking

    (3 cr) This course provides comprehensive coverage in networking and networking theory demonstrated by real-world examples with case studies and hands-on projects. To focus on fundamental principles and concepts of networking including the understanding, design, validation, and evaluation of current networked system and devices hardware, media, architectures, and protocols.
  
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    MBA 581 - Web Programming

    (3 cr) This course examines Internet/Web concepts and high quality Web design. Students will develop an understanding of concepts that are essential to today’s Web-based computing. Languages (HTML/XML, DHTML, JavaScript, etc.) and tools are covered with emphasis on client-side Web programming.
  
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    MBA 582 - Management Information Systems

    (3 cr) An integration of the material covered in previous programming and systems courses. An examination of modern management information systems in a business setting. Topics include structured decision systems, decision support systems, information systems acquisition and management, database management systems, and the role of information processing systems in business decisions.
  
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    MBA 588 - Database Management Systems

    (3 cr) The design and maintenance of a computerized database management system. Includes all operations such as design, creation, searching, sorting, and editing that must be performed on both sequential and direct access files and sets of files. Examines advantages and disadvantages of tree, network, and relational data structures. Coverage of query languages, data dictionaries, and security and privacy considerations.
  
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    MBA 590 - Applied Research Project and Capstone

    (3-6cr) The student will identify a problem of interest, analyze the problem as completely as possible, offer the best alternative(s) for solution, and describe the problem and the proposed solution(s) in a case-study format. Previously titled Applied Research Project.
  
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    MBA 591 - MBA Internship and Capstone

    (3-6cr) The internship provides students with the opportunity to apply the cumulative knowledge and skills in the MBA program to a real-world work environment. The internship involves the following steps: 1) selecting a work site; 2) developing a contract that ensures both employer and student benefit; 3) fulfilling the contract activity through ongoing work; and 4) preparing a paper that summarizes the learning experience and outcomes. The expectation is for a minimum of 150 hours completed in this internship for 3 credits and 300 hours for 6 credits. Previously offered for 3 credits only. Prerequisites: Instructor permission required. Students should plan to secure their internship site the semester prior to when they plan to enroll.
  
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    MBA 599 - Special Topics: M.B.A. Seminar

    (3 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the business field. MBA 599 courses are repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits with different topics.
  
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    MBA 600 - Study Abroad

    (3cr) This course is designed to accommodate a variety of student needs for exposure to international business and culture. Location of study and duration of study will vary depending upon student need, faculty availability, and prior arrangement. This course will emphasize the global context in which business is conducted and will offer the student experiential learning along with research and in-country investigation internship.
  
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    MBA 699 - Special Topics: M.B.A. Seminar

    (3 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the business field. MBA 699 courses are repeatable to a maximum of 9 credits with different topics.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 100 - Freshman Seminar

    (1 cr) This course provides beginning freshman students with information and tools to prepare them for a successful life as a student. This course is aimed at developing the cognitive skills required in computer, mathematics, and engineering courses. The activities in this course are designed to introduce the student to an academic support system through which freshman students can explore various concentrations in computer science, mathematics, and engineering and learn academic success strategies including developing a support network.  This course also helps students develop good wellness habits that have lifelong benefits. 

    CORE CODE:  FY

  
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    MATH 101 - Fundamentals of Mathematics

    (3 cr) A mastery-based preparation for college algebra. Topics include operations on polynomial and rational expressions, solving and graphing equations and inequalities, solving linear systems using substitution and elimination, and factoring. Prerequisites: ACT Mathematics score 19 or SAT Mathematics score 510 (after March 2016), or satisfactory ACCUPLACER  math placement score.

    CORE CODES :  MA

  
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    MATH 101A - Fundamental Mathematics I

    (2 cr) A mastery-based preparation for college algebra. Topics include operations on algebraic expressions, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving linear systems using substitution and elimination, and factoring. Placement in this sequence of courses is determined by SAT or ACT score as mandated by state policy. Together with MATH 101B , is equivalent to MATH 101  for Tier One Core Curriculum Mathematics.
  
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    MATH 101B - Fundamental Mathematics II

    (2 cr) A mastery-based preparation for college algebra.  Topics include working with rational expressions, solving and graphing quadratic equations and inequalities, and factoring.  This course, together with MATH 101A , is equivalent to MATH 101  for Tier One Core Curriculum Mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 101A .
  
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    MATH 102 - Math for Elementary Teachers

    (3 cr) A study of the structure of mathematical systems and operations defined on these systems; historical development of numbers and number systems including contributions from diverse cultures; and elementary probability, statistics, data analysis, and basic geometry. Emphasis on building conceptual understanding and developing problem-solving skills. Appropriate use of technology will be incorporated throughout the course.
  
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    MATH 105 - College Algebra

    (3 cr) Topics in college algebra include properties of the real numbers; radicals and rational exponents; operations on polynomials and rational expressions; solution of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; functions, including graphs and composite functions; properties of linear functions; and systems of two linear equations and inequalities. Prerequisites: MATH 101  or equivalent (MATH 101A  and MATH 101B ), or satisfactory placement score of ACT Mathematics score 19 or SAT Mathematics score 460 (old exam) or 500 (new exam).
  
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    MATH 106 - Trigonometry

    (3 cr) A study of the trigonometric functions and identities, multiple angle formulas, inverse trigonometric functions, deMoivres theorem and complex numbers, applications. Prerequisites: MATH 105  or satisfactory placement score.
  
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    MATH 107 - Quantitative Reasoning

    (3cr) Designed for non-science majors to help students understand the contemporary role of mathematics. Real-world problems are emphasized. Includes problem-solving strategies within the topics of management science, data handling and statistical reasoning, social choice, and geometry and measurement. Placement in this course is determined by math placement and ACT or SAT scores. Prerequisites: ACT Mathematics score 19 or SAT Mathematics score 460 (old exam) or 500 (new exam), or satisfactory ACCUPLACER placement.

    CORE CODES :  MA

  
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    MATH 107A - Quantitative Reasoning with Lab

    (4cr) Designed for non-science majors to help students understand the contemporary role of mathematics. Real-world problems are emphasized. Includes problem-solving strategies within the topics of management science, data handling and statistical reasoning, social choice, and geometry and measurement.

    CORE CODES :   MA

  
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    MATH 108 - Precalculus

    (4 cr) Topics in algebra which will prepare students for the study of calculus, including complex numbers, graphs of nonlinear functions and relations, conic sections, graphical and algebraic solutions of nonlinear equations, solutions of exponential and logarithmic equations, introduction to analytic geometry, sequences, series, summations, and mathematical induction, and topics including trigonometry functions and identities, and inverse trigonometric functions. Prerequisites: MATH 105  or satisfactory placement score of ACT Math 22 or SAT Math 510 (old exam) or 540 (new exam).
  
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    MATH 109 - Statistical Reasoning

    (3cr) This is a first course in statistical methods. The course will focus on problem situations that require the appropriate collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of data to support reasonable conclusions. The use of statistical technology is required. Placement in this course is determined by math placement and ACT or SAT scores. Prerequisites: ACT Mathematics score 19 or SAT Mathematics score 460 (old exam) or 500 (new exam), or satisfactory ACCUPLACER placement.

    CORE CODES :   MA

  
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    MATH 109A - Statistical Reasoning with Lab

    (4cr) This is a first course in statistical methods. The course will focus on problem situations that require the appropriate collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of data to support reasonable conclusions.

     

    CORE CODES :   MA

  
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    MATH 154 - Finite Mathematics

    (3 cr) Mathematical models for the analysis of decision-making problems are examined. Topics include the echelon method for solving linear equations, matrix manipulations, optimization by linear programming including the simplex method, risk decisions using probability, expected value, and statistics. Additional topics may be chosen from network models or game theory. Prerequisites: MATH 105  or satisfactory placement score of ACT Mathematics score 22 or SAT Mathematics score 510 (old exam) or 540 (new exam).
  
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    MATH 155 - Discrete Structures

    (3 cr) Topics in this course include solutions for a system of linear equations, matrix algebra, optimization problems and duality, counting arguments, combinations and permutations, elementary probability theory, Markov chains, elementary graph theory, and other applications arising out of finite mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 105  or satisfactory math placement score of ACT Mathematics score 22 or SAT Mathematics score 510 (old exam) or 540 (new exam) . Students in the Department of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Engineering must use this course instead of MATH 154  as the Core Curriculum requirement, unless otherwise specified.
  
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    MATH 200 - Geometry and Measurement

    (3 cr) This course explores the fundamental ideas of planar and spatial geometry. Content includes the analysis and classification of geometric figures; the study of geometry transformations; the concepts of tessellation, symmetry, congruence, and similarity; connection of geometry to other mathematical topics and to nature and art; and an overview of measurement. The course also includes an introduction to the use of computers in the teaching and learning of informal geometry. Prerequisites: MATH 102  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MATH 205 - Calculus With Applications

    (4 cr) Topics in differential and integral calculus, with stress on their applications in business, biology, social, and behavioral sciences. Prerequisites: MATH 108  or satisfactory math placement test score of ACT 25 or SAT 580 (old exam) or 600 (new exam).
  
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    MATH 207 - Calculus I

    (4 cr) Fundamental concepts of calculus, using analytic geometry. After preliminaries about the real number system, intervals, and functions, properties of limits are carefully stated. These are used to develop standard differentiation formulas. Applications of the derivative (as a rate of change) are stressed in a wide variety of problems. Introduction to integration via anti-differentiation and area and the fundamental theorem. Applications of the integral (volumes, arc length, surface area, etc.) Prerequisites: MATH 108  or satisfactory math placement score of ACT 25 or SAT 580 (old exam) or 600 (new exam).

     :   MA
  
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    MATH 208 - Calculus II

    (4 cr) Continuation of MATH 207. Calculus of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; techniques of integration. Review of conic sections in standard form and in rotation. Polar coordinates, l’Hôpital’s rule, improper integrals, infinite series, and Taylor series. Prerequisites: MATH 207 .
  
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    MATH 218 - Numerical Methods

    (3 cr) A study of numerical methods for interpolation, approximation, root finding, differentiation, integration, and linear and nonlinear systems. Computer algorithm development and error analysis will be emphasized. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 208 .
  
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    MATH 254 - Discrete Mathematics

    (3 cr) Topics from modern mathematics with particular emphasis on those with applications to computer science. Logic, sets, number systems and number theory, enumeration, graphs and trees, matrices, finite algebraic systems, and analysis of algorithms are examined. Prerequisites: MATH 154  or MATH 155 ; or MATH 205  or MATH 207 .
  
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    MATH 280 - Symbolic Logic

    (2 cr) Classical introduction to Aristotelian logic using truth tables or Venn diagrams. Application to Boolean arithmetic and algebra. Positive and negative logic as in gate structures for digital circuits. Prerequisites: MATH 105 , MATH 155 , or MATH 101 .
  
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    MATH 290 - Practicum in Mathematics Teaching

    (1 cr) Classical introduction to Aristotelian logic using truth tables or Venn diagrams. Application to Boolean arithmetic and algebra. Positive and negative logic as in gate structures for digital circuits. Prerequisites: MATH 105 , MATH 155 , or MATH 101 .
  
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    MATH 291 - Practicum in Mathematics Teaching

    (1 cr) Practical experience in teaching mathematics will be provided in a tutorial setting, under the guidance and supervision of a faculty member. Two or three hours of student-tutor interaction will be arranged each week. Prerequisites: MATH 207 .
  
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    MATH 300 - Math Methods for Elementary Teachers

    (3 cr) An in-depth study of the elementary curriculum content examining methods, problems, and techniques involved in mathematics instruction. Prerequisites: MATH 102  and MATH 200 .
  
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    MATH 307 - Introduction to Linear Algebra

    (3 cr) The course begins with a study of linear systems, using matrices and determinants to solve them. Vector spaces are treated axiomatically and discussed geometrically. Linear transformation of vector spaces and their matrix representations are considered. Finally eigenvectors and eigenvalues are considered with applications. Prerequisites: MATH 155  or MATH 254 , and MATH 207  or MATH 205 .
  
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    MATH 309 - Calculus III

    (4 cr) Continuation of MATH 208. Vectors in the plane and in space, parametric equations, solid analytic geometry. Calculus of functions of several variables including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and their applications. Prerequisites: MATH 208 .
  
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    MATH 310 - Differential Equations

    (4 cr) Examines first order ordinary differential equations (e.g., exact, separable, Bernoulli, homogeneous), direction field, numerical solution; higher order equations including the methods of Lagrange and undetermined coefficients; Laplace transforms; systems of first order equations; introduction to Fourier series; and applications in the physical and biological sciences. Prerequisites: MATH 208 , and MATH 307 .
  
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    MATH 312 - Introduction to Abstract Algebra

    (3 cr) Introduction to algebraic structures such as groups, rings, and fields. Formal development of their properties, complemented by examples and applications. Prerequisites: MATH 208 , MATH 307 , and MATH 254 .
  
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    MATH 314 - Statistics

    (3 cr) This is a first course in statistics, primarily for those needing knowledge of statistical methods and the interpretation of statistical data. It discusses basic probability ideas, then deals with frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion; hypothesis testing using z, t, and chi-square tests; correlation, linear regression, and one-way ANOVA. For reinforcement, students must complete several laboratory assignments using statistical software. Students may not receive credit for both this course and BADM 224 . Prerequisites: MATH 105  or higher, or permission of chair.
  
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    MATH 318 - Numerical Analysis

    (3 cr) A study of the mathematics of numerical approximation. Topics include initial value problems, iterative techniques for linear systems, approximation theory, finding eigen values, boundary value problems, and numerical solutions to partial differential equations. Prerequisites: MATH 307 .
  
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    MATH 321 - Probability and Statistics

    (3 cr) Topics include axioms for probability; random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions; expected value; functions of random variables; covariance; conditional probability; independence; confidence intervals; tests of hypotheses: normal, t, signed-rank, chi-square tests; linear regression and correlation. Prerequisites: MATH 309 .
  
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    MATH 329 - Mathematical Modeling

    (3 cr) A study of how to model the world around us using mathematics, how to solve the resulting equations, and how to apply the results. Includes a thorough study of how to use both quantitative and qualitative solution behavior in the modeling process. Prerequisites: MATH 208  or MATH 254 .
  
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    MATH 354 - Operations Research

    (3 cr) An introduction to main topics of operations research: linear programming, network optimization, dynamic programming, and queueing theory. The simplex algorithm will be studied in detail, including duality theory and sensitivity analysis. In network optimization the OSPF algorithm, PERT, and CPM will be considered. Examples of applications from industry, notably some queueing algorithms. Additional topics may be chosen from Markov chains, integer programming, nonlinear programming, game theory and decision analysis, and simulation. Prerequisites: MATH 155  and MATH 207  or MATH 254 .
  
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    MATH 392 - Cooperative Education in Mathematics

    (3-9 cr) Cooperative Education is a form of education which integrates classroom study with paid, planned, and supervised work experiences in the public and private sectors. Cooperative education allows students to acquire essential, practical skills by being exposed to the reality of the work world beyond the boundaries of campus, enhancing their self-confidence and career direction. Co-ops may extend beyond the semester and may be paid positions. A co-op must have an academic component. A cooperative education agreement is signed by the employer supervisor, the faculty supervisor, and the student. The co-op may be repeated for credit, but not in the same term; the topic must be different. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; minimum 2.5 overall GPA; approval of Mathematics and Engineering Department; placement by Career Center.
  
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    MATH 404 - Number Theory

    (3 cr) An introductory course in number theory with emphasis on the classical theorems and problems. Prerequisites: MATH 307  or MATH 312 .
  
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    MATH 405 - Topics in Modern Mathematics

    (3 cr) A course designed to acquaint the advanced student with certain topics outside the traditional course in mathematics. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
  
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    MATH 409 - Introduction to Complex Variables

    (3 cr) The course begins with the arithmetic of complex numbers, including powers, roots, and polar representation, with special emphasis on the geometric view. Several function classes are studied in the setting of the complex plane, especially linear, linear fractional, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric. Includes basic notions from calculus, particularly limits, continuity, and the derivative, are reexamined in the complex setting. Special attention is given to the properties of analytic functions, harmonic functions, and the Cauchy-Riemann equations. Applications are considered in areas such as steady state temperature patterns and electrostatic potentials. The latter part of the course deals with contour integration techniques, power series representation, and the classic theorems on analytic functions of a complex variable. Prerequisites: MATH 309  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MATH 410 - Advanced Calculus

    (3 cr) A thorough examination of the fundamentals of elementary calculus and its extensions, with emphasis on interrelation with other areas of mathematics, and upon various applications. Prerequisites: MATH 309 ; MATH 307  or MATH 312 .
  
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    MATH 413 - Quantitative Methods

    (3 cr) See BADM 315  in Business Administration course listings.
  
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    MATH 414 - History and Development of Mathematics

    (3 cr) A capstone course requiring mathematical maturity. A survey of mathematical topics dating from ancient times, with emphasis on the development of numbers, algebra, theory of planetary motion, and non-Euclidean geometry. In preparation for a comprehensive test, a structured review of core mathematical ideas and techniques will be included. Prerequisites: MATH 208  and MATH 312 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    MATH 415 - Introduction to Topology

    (3 cr) Study of the properties of regions unaffected by continuous mappings. Includes consideration of open and closed sets, interior and boundary of a set, and neighborhood systems; motivation for concrete applications of the idea of a topological space and its separation properties. Other topics may include various applications of the notions of convergence and compactness. Prerequisites: MATH 207 ; MATH 307  or MATH 312 .
  
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    MATH 420 - Partial Differential Equations

    (3 cr) This course is a brief introduction to methods of solving partial differential equations (PDE) using Green’s Function, Fourier Series, etc. In particular, heat and wave equations will be studied in more detail. Some nonlinear PDE may be considered as well. Prerequisites: MATH 309  and MATH 310 . Corequisite: MATH 409 .
 

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