Nov 27, 2020  
2019-2020 Shepherd University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Shepherd University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses by Subject


NOTE:  300- and 400-level courses are restricted to students who are sophomore-level and above.

 

Nursing (Graduate)

  
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    NURS 632 - DNP Practicum

    (1-6cr) The course provides the opportunity for the student to have a mentored experience, under faculty supervision, where the DNP competencies can be explored and mastered in an area of the student’s choice.  This course may be split into two semesters, with completion in the final semester of the student’s academic program.  This course includes 360 clinical practice hours. This course is repeatable once, to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.

Pharmaceutical Sciences

  
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    PHAR 311 - Chemical Properties of Drugs

    (2 cr) Principles of chemical stability and chemical properties as they relate to drug molecules. Topics to be covered include functional group analysis, solubility, oil/water partitioning, organic acids and bases, and drug decomposition and metabolism.
  
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    PHAR 312 - Pharmaceutics I (Calculations)

    (2cr) Pharmaceutics I examines the system of weights and measures and the arithmetical and mathematical expertise required for the compounding, dispensing, and utilization of drugs. Basic technical aspects of dispensing drugs and medical terminology will be discussed. Classes will consist of lecture, case presentations and drill and practice (both problem sets and computer based). This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students.
  
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    PHAR 321 - Biomedical Sciences I

    (2cr) This course provides students with an overview of advanced biomedical science topics such as biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology that will serve as a foundation for immunology, medical microbiology, pathophysiology, toxicology, pharmacogenomics, pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics as relevant to pharmacy students. This course will appraise how these biomedical processes apply to healthcare professions. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students.
  
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    PHAR 339 - Essentials of Pharmacogenomics

    (2cr) The rapidly emerging discipline of pharmacogenomics addresses the heritable variability in the way a person, based on their genetic makeup, responds to drugs. This course will introduce student pharmacists to topics in genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry as relevant to the field of pharmacogenomics. Additionally, student pharmacists will be introduced to some common laboratory techniques currently in use in pharmacogenomics research labs and quickly evolving topics such as economics, informatics, and policy. The course will serve as the foundation for future discussions in pharmacogenomics in the more advanced pharmacy curriculum and prepare pharmacists as key players in the future of personalized medicine. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students. Prerequisites: PHAR 321 .
  
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    PHAR 349 - Nonprescription Products

    (3cr) This course addresses nonprescription products and examines the pharmacist’s role in helping the public choose appropriate products. The course will address nonprescription drug pharmacology, adverse effects, drug-drug interactions, and drug-food interactions. Other non-pharmacological over-the-counter products will be discussed, including devices and durable medical equipment. The pharmacist’s role in dispensing these products will also be addressed. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students.
  
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    PHAR 400 - Pharm Practice/Management I

    (4cr) Introduces student to the practice of pharmacy, with a focus on community pharmacy. PPM I is the first course in a five-course sequence (PPM 1-5) that introduces and reinforces the distributive, clinical, and administrative roles of pharmacists in various practice settings. (First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent) Prerequisites: First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent.
  
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    PHAR 401 - Drug Delivery

    (5cr) An introduction to the concepts and techniques involved in the design and evaluation of pharmaceutical dosage forms, principles of physical pharmacy and drug delivery, and their applications in patient care. (First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent) Prerequisites: First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent.
  
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    PHAR 402 - Physical Pharmacy

    (3 cr) Designed to teach students the basic principles related to physical phenomena and stability as well as introduce them to a variety of factors that influce drug dosage form design and stability.
  
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    PHAR 403 - Prep of Pharm. Products

    (2cr) Gain experience in pharmaceutical calculations and preparing sterile and non-sterile dosage forms. Students will apply the principles of pharmaceutics to the preparation of pharmaceutical products. (First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent) Prerequisites: First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent.
  
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    PHAR 408 - Pharmaceutics

    (3 cr) Parmaceutics builds upon the concepts discussed in physical pharmacy and focuses on drug dosage forms and delivery systems, their design, drug delivery to the body through a variety of routes, and factors affecting drug delivery.
  
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    PHAR 409 - Immunology and Biotechnology

    (2 cr) Students will learn basic functions of the immune system, elements of the pharmaceutical applications of biotechnology, and be introduced to the chemotherapy of infections.
  
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    PHAR 412 - Pharmaceutics II

    (4cr) Pharmaceutics II emphasizes the study of legal, practical, and scientific basis of drug products and pharmaceutical delivery systems. It presents physicochemical theories, terminology, pharmaceutical skills, and interpretation of performance of pharmaceutical products. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students. Prerequisites: PHAR 312 . Corequisite: PHAR 413 .
  
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    PHAR 413 - Pharmaceutics and Compounding

    (1cr) This course introduces and develops skills and techniques required to formulate, evaluate, and prepare compounded pharmaceutical preparations and manufactured products. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students. Corequisite: PHAR 412 .
  
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    PHAR 414 - Biochemical Pharmacology

    (4cr) Provides a basis for understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which drugs and the body interact. This course will use drug classes to introduce foundational concepts of drug action and the application of pharmaceutical tools to better understand how drugs work in the body. (First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent) Prerequisites: First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent.
  
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    PHAR 415 - Biopharmaceut. and Genomics

    (4cr) Develops an understanding of fundamental principles of biopharmaceutics and pharmacogenomics. (First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent) Prerequisites: First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent.
     
  
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    PHAR 416 - Drug Chemistry and Biotech.

    (3cr) Introduces principles of chemical stability and chemical properties as they relate to drugs and to the basic metabolic processes observed for drug molecules. Biotechnology will focus on pharmaceutical applications of cell and molecular biotechnology. (First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent) Prerequisites:
    First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent.
     
  
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    PHAR 421 - Biomedical Sciences II

    (3cr) This course builds upon the foundational knowledge presented in Biomedical Sciences I and explores advanced biomedical science topics such as immunology, oncology, and medical microbiology that will serve as a foundation for pathophysiology, toxicology, pharmacology, and pharmacotherapeutics as relevant to pharmacy students. This course will appraise how these biomedical processes apply to healthcare professions. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students.
  
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    PHAR 431 - General Biochemistry

    (4 cr) This course is designed to be a general introduction to biochemical compounds, processes, and concepts for students in the pharmacy program. Topics such as enzyme mechanisms, therapeutic use of enzyme inhibitors, effects of drugs on various metabolic pathways, signal transduction, and biotransformation provide basic information for subsequent pharmacy courses in the training of students for the practice of pharmacy, including passage of the Pharmacy Board examination.  Four lectures per week.
  
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    PHAR 437 - Integrated Pathophysiology I

    (3cr) This course builds on the foundational knowledge presented in Biomedical Sciences I and II.  Student pharmacists will be provided with the pathophysiology of the endocrine, nervous, GI, and musculoskeletal systems, as well as other topics as appropriate. These topics will serve as a foundation for pharmacology, therapeutics, and pharmacogenomics as relevant to future pharmacists. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students.
  
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    PHAR 438 - Integrated Pathophysiology II

    (3cr) This course builds on the foundational knowledge presented in Biomedical Sciences I and II and Integrated Pathophysiology I.  Student pharmacists will be provided with the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and reproductive systems, as well as other topics as appropriate. These topics will serve as a foundation for pharmacology, therapeutics, and pharmacogenomics as relevant to future pharmacists. This course is limited to first-year pharmacy students.
  
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    PHAR 443 - Fundamentals of Physiology

    (5 cr) Analysis of basic facts and concepts relating to cellular processes, organ systems, and their control.  Three lectures, one conference, one lab per week.
  
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    PHAR 445 - Body Function

    (4cr) A study of contemporary topics in Human Body function selected from recent developments in the field. (First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent) Cross-listed
      Prerequisites: First year professional standing Pharm.D. or consent.

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 100 - Introduction to Liberal Arts Study

    (3 cr) This course prepares students for a successful academic career through the cultivation of valued skills in the liberal arts such as critical reading and analysis; writing and discussion; and argument and debate. Students are exposed to a series of primary texts, complied by the course faculty, dealing with a range of diverse creative, intellectual, and ethical ideas, Students are also introduced to many helpful campus resources as well as university transition strategies such as time management, study skills, information literacy, note-taking, technology usage, and test anxiety coping skills.
  
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    PHIL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy

    (3 cr) An introductory consideration of language, meaning, and inference; of knowledge, truth, and certainty; of types (schools) of philosophy; of arguments regarding the existence of God; and of values.
  
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    PHIL 208 - Survey of Philosophy

    (3 cr) A survey of the classic philosophical texts from the ancient and classical traditions through the 21st century. Works will be drawn from both Western and non-Western cultures.

     :   HM   CK

  
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    PHIL 210 - Social Philosophy

    (3 cr) Analysis of theories of the nature of humans, social institutions, social ethics, social purposes, patterns of relationship, and the problem of freedom and regulation.
  
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    PHIL 304 - Philosophy of Religion

    (3 cr) An analysis of certain elements of religious thought. Problems of religious language, knowledge and faith, and the existence of God and evil will be examined from various religious perspectives.
  
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    PHIL 305 - History of Philosophy

    (3 cr) Survey of the major movements in philosophy from ancient Greece to the 20th century.
  
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    PHIL 306 - Twentieth-Century Philosophy

    (3 cr) Emphasis on pragmatism, existentialism, and analytic philosophy.
  
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    PHIL 315 - Ethics

    (3 cr) Problems of choice within the context of society as considered by representatives of various philosophical and Christian traditions.

Photography/Computer Imagery

  
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    PHOT 281 - Digital Photography

    (3cr) Fundamentals of digital photographic production. Topics include basic understanding of DSLR camera functioning, image capture, digital image software, basic manipulation tools and techniques, lighting, composition, and visual thinking. Emphasis is placed on technical proficiency and individual artistic expression. Students must have a digital camera with manual controls and RAW format capabilities (DSLR recommended). Previously titled Black and White Photography I (thru Fall 2012), then Basic Photography.
  
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    PHOT 282 - Darkroom Photography

    (3cr) Fundamentals of analog black and white photography and darkroom techniques. Topics include understanding of a 35mm film camera functioning, film processing, darkroom printing, lighting, exposure selection, composition, and visual thinking. Previously titled Black and White Photography II (thru Fall 2012), then Intermediate Photography.
  
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    PHOT 290 - History of Photography

    (3 cr) An introductory course which explores, through student emulation and experimentation, the compositional sensibilities and aesthetic strategies of both historic and contemporary photographers. From Fall 1995 to Spring 1999, and again from Fall 2013-Spring 2016, was offered as PHOT 280.  From Fall 1999 to Spring 2013, and again from Fall 2016 to Spring 2018, was offered as PHOT 380.
  
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    PHOT 381 - Studio Photography

    (3 cr) This course serves as an introduction to the methodology and technology of studio photography. Emphasis is placed upon product and portrait photography, tabletop design, and lighting techniques. Prerequisites: PHOT 383 .
  
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    PHOT 382 - Medium and Large Format Photo

    (3cr) This class will present a chance for students to experience image taking through the use of the analog process for large format imagery. Students will be introduced to 2 1/4, 4x5, and 8x10 film for camera and film. Prerequisites: PHOT 282 .
  
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    PHOT 383 - Color Light in Photography

    (3 cr) This course explores the digital techniques, history, and imagery in color photography. Topics include how theory relates directly to the practice of making color imagery and the exploration of conceptual ideas and techniques for photographic exploration. Prerequisites: PHOT 281 .
  
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    PHOT 385 - Digital Imagery Manipulation

    (3cr) This course is an intermediate level Photoshop class which investigates techniques and approaches to digital manipulation within the context of photography. Topics include fine-tuning photographic adjustments, non-destructive editing techniques, and the creation of composite photographs as solutions to creative and technical problems. A basic understanding of Photoshop is expected upon entering this course. Previously titled Computer Digital Imagery (Spring 1995 - Fall 2012), and Digital Imagery (Spring 2013 - Spring 2018). Prerequisites: PHOT 281 .
  
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    PHOT 389 - Image and Meaning

    (3 cr) As a continually evolving and expanding artistic medium, photography is becoming increasingly more difficult to define. Through research, theory, and practice, this course will investigate the current aesthetic trends in photography in the context of contemporary art and culture. Prerequisite/corequisite: PHOT 381 .
  
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    PHOT 390 - Social Representation in Photography

    (3cr) This class will explore social photography image making, which is the collecting, editing and presenting of news materials for publication or broadcast that creates images in order to tell a story. It includes documentary photography, social documentary photography, street photography, sports photography, and others. Prerequisites: PHOT 383 .
  
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    PHOT 400 - Special Topics in Photography/Computer Imagery

    (3 cr) This course will vary in content with each offering as areas of particular interest or timeliness not covered by the regular curriculum are explored. Offerings may focus on a specific photographic or computer imagery process or style or on a specific area of content. Each course offering under this title bears a subtitle which indicates the specific subject covered. PHOT 400 is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.
  
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    PHOT 420 - Time-Based Media

    (3 cr) An introduction to video art and the relationship between image and sound in time-based media production. Emphasis is placed on the use of metaphor, sequencing, and linear/nonlinear narrative structures in regard to animation, video, and film. Prerequisites: PHOT 385 .
  
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    PHOT 480 - Research in Photography I

    (3 cr) This course designed as a culminating experience within the concentration area of photography with emphasis on contemporary photographic issues. The development of a portfolio and artist’s statement as well as advanced standards of critical observation and analysis are expected. Prerequisites: PHOT 383 .
  
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    PHOT 482 - Photography and Advertising

    (3 cr) This is an upper-division studio class that provides an insight into the concepts of creative thinking in photographic advertising and exposes students to new approaches in methods and techniques of producing single images for adverting, along with various components of advance studio work. Prerequisite/corequisite: PHOT 381 .
  
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    PHOT 483 - Alternative Processes

    (3 cr) This class explores various photographic processes as a means of creating effects other than the standard rendition. Nonsilver, instant-print manipulations and other processes and techniques will be presented. Prerequisites: PHOT 282 .
  
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    PHOT 486 - Advanced Photography

    (3cr) This course is designed as a continuing experience within the concentration area of photography with emphasis on research of contemporary issues. The development of a series of images that demonstrates a visual idea and a thorough exploration of a chosen process is expected. This course is repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: PHOT 383 .
  
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    PHOT 488 - Internship in Photography

    (3-6 cr) Supervised off-campus work experience in photography or an allied field. Seminars will be held to evaluate the integration of theory and practice. Prerequisites: Permission for the instructor. This course may be repeated for up to 6 hours.
  
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    PHOT 489 - Research in Photography II

    (3 cr) This course is a continuing exploration of the visual experience within the concentration area of photography with emphasis on contemporary photographic issues. The development of a portfolio as well as advanced standards of critical observation, analysis, and written essays are required. Prerequisites: PHOT 480 .

Physical Education

  
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    PHED 104 - Foundations of Health and Physical Education

    (3 cr) An introduction to teaching health and physical education. Topics include philosophy and history, psychological, sociological, and scientific principles of sport and physical activity, as well as career awareness, department procedures, the Shepherd University Teaching Model for skill acquisition, and general concerns related to teaching health and physical education.
  
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    PHED 110 - Elementary School Physical Education Activities

    (3 cr) Students will develop a working knowledge of fundamental movement patterns as they relate to action songs, folk and square dance, games, creative movement, and rhythmical activities. Teaching methods, program planning, and teaching opportunities are emphasized. Elementary education majors only.
  
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    PHED 215 - Fundamental Movements, Gymnastics, and Dance

    (3cr) This course is designed to provide physical education teacher education candidates with the content knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to teach developmentally appropriate progressions for fundamental skills/concepts, dance, and gymnastics.  Previously titled Teaching Tumbling and Gymnastics (2cr). Previously numbered as PHED 315.
  
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    PHED 225 - Teaching Games for Tactical Understanding

    (3 cr) This course is designed to assess technical and tactical performance capabilities of Physical Education Teacher Candidates (TC). The course aligns with PETE accreditation standards using a Tactical Games for Understanding and small-sided games (SSG) practice approach.  Previously Team Sport Activities. Previously numbered as PHED 325.
  
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    PHED 226 - Teaching Net and Wall Games

    (3 cr) Designed to assess technical and tactical performance skills utilized in net and wall games. This course alights with PETE accreditation standards for the development of skills and game performance. Previously numbered as PHED 326.  Previously titled Individual Sport Activities.
  
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    PHED 227 - Teaching Target and Fielding Games

    (3cr) Designed to assess technical and tactical performance skills utilized in target and field-run-score games. This course aligns with PETE accreditation standards using a “Games for Understanding” approach in the development of skills and game performance.
  
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    PHED 246 - Aquatics

    (1 cr) This course emphasizes basic strokes, breathing techniques, and water safety skills, including survival floating and use of clothing as a flotation device.
  
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    PHED 300 - Content and Instruction in Physical Education

    (3cr) Introduction and development of specialized physical education content for the elementary and secondary school child with an emphasis on developmentally appropriate practices related to curriculum, management and organization essential to the teaching of movement activities and sport skills utilized in K-12 physical education. Prerequisites: PHED 215 . Prerequisite/corequisite: PHED 301  and/or PHED 431 .
  
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    PHED 301 - Elementary Physical Education Methods

    (3 cr) Teacher candidates will learn and utilize physical education teaching models to develop and implement a specific unit of instruction in an elementary school setting. Previously Elementary School Physical Education I.

    Restricted to Secondary Education majors with a teaching field in Physical Education. Prerequisites: EDUC 320 .

  
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    PHED 380 - Perceptual Motor Learning

    (3 cr) Examines how people learn motor skills through the Shepherd University Teaching Model for skill acquisition. Student will also learn how to recognize deficiencies related to motor learning and adjust teaching procedures to cope with inherent disabilities.
  
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    PHED 400 - Current Issues and Trends in Health and Physical Education

    (3 cr) The course will examine readings and research associated with issues and trends in health and physical education in K-12 schools. Students will have the opportunity to apply previous peer teaching, field teaching, and observational experiences to case studies and current field observations. Focus will be on technology use, diversity, and disabilities, with an in-depth look at student and teacher behaviors. Prerequisites: PHED 225 , PHED 226 , PHED 301 .
  
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    PHED 401 - Teaching Adapted Physical Education

    (3 cr) Acquaints students with the problems underlying the need for adapted physical education programs. Organization and administration of special physical education programs for the handicapped/ disabled are studied. Out-of-class field experience in an approved setting required.
  
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    PHED 410 - Assessment of Learning in Physical Education and Sport

    (3cr) Physical education candidates learn to select and implement appropriate assessments to monitor students’ progress and guide decision making related to instruction and learning.  Previously titled Tests and Measurements in Physical Education. Prerequisites: EDUC 320 .
  
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    PHED 431 - Secondary Physical Education Methods

    (3 cr) A focus on contemporary approaches to teaching secondary physical education with an emphasis on management of the learning environment, planning and implementation of effective instruction for student learning, and secondary curriculum development.  Previously numbered EDUC 431. Previously titled Special Methods of Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary and Secondary Schools.

    Restricted to Secondary Education majors with a teaching field in Physical Education. Prerequisites: EDUC 320 .

  
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    PHED 490 - Human Growth and Development

    (3cr) This course will familiarize HPERS professionals with the major theories of human growth and development and the continuing research in the field. Students will develop an understanding of human development including the cognitive, emotional, physical, and social domains of each state of development. An emphasis will be placed on the role developmental stages play in the teaching and leading of physical activities for all ages.  Previously titled Human Growth and Development for HPERS. Prerequisites: RECR 140 , RECR 210  or permission of the instructor.

Physical Education (Graduate)

  
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    PHED 560 - Advanced Measurement and Assessment for the Physical Educator

    (3 cr) This course is intended to develop an accountable and dependable means of grade assignment in physical education rooted in a sound philosophy of skill/knowledge development. The course will further develop a sound assessment of program strategy that will incorporate both state and national intended goals and objectives. The course will be taught using PowerPoint presentation software and assignments will be made requiring presentation and statistical analysis on the computer. This course is intended to alleviate one of the most serious professional physical educator problems—grading accountability—in the discipline, while also providing a perspective of total program accountability through assessment.
  
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    PHED 561 - Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Activity

    (3 cr) This course examines the interrelationships among physical activity, physical education, sport and exercise, and psychosocial variables relating to these activities. Topics that may be included are socialization into sport, exercise, and physical activity; cultural values; aggression; motivation; and psychological benefits of physical activity, exercise adherence, and participation in physical education.
  
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    PHED 562 - Teaching Behavior in Health and Physical Education

    (3 cr) This course is a study of research on teaching effectiveness in health and physical education. The teaching and learning process is examined in order to identify critical elements of age-appropriate behavior specific to health and physical education.
  
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    PHED 563 - Administration of Athletes and Physical Education

    (3 cr) This course will focus on policies and problems of organization and administration of physical education and athletic programs in schools and colleges with emphasis on the case study approach.
  
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    PHED 564 - Curricular Models in Teaching Physical Education

    (3 cr) An interactive, hands-on class that will examine previous, present, and future curricular models and issues, including situational areas related to legal, professional, administrative, and teaching. Discussion and design of programs related to health and physical education in K-12 schools will be included.
  
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    PHED 565 - Advanced Strength and Conditioning for Physical Education and Athletic Programs

    (3 cr) This course introduces topics related to the physiological basis of designing strength and conditioning programs for physical education and athletic programs at the high school, collegiate, and elite training levels.
  
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    PHED 566 - Exercise Management for Special Populations

    (3 cr) This course is designed to review the ACSM Standards and Guidelines for evaluating fitness levels and designing activity prescriptions for select special populations. Lecture and laboratory-experiences will expose the student to clients with a variety of chronic diseases and disabilities including the following conditions: pregnancy, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, elderly, arthritis, osteoporosis, children, pulmonary diseases (asthma, cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders), cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, aneurysms, select syndromes, myocardial infarction, angina, pacemakers and defibrillators, coronary artery bypass graft, and angioplasty (STCA). Students will be encouraged to observe and, in select cases, participate in program prescriptive analysis, development, and delivery in specialized rehabilitative and therapeutic settings.
  
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    PHED 590 - Advanced Human Development for HPERS Professionals

    (3 cr) This course will familiarize HPERS professionals with the major theories of human growth and development and the continuing research in the field. Students will develop an understanding of human development including the cognitive, emotional, physical, and social domains of each stage of development. An emphasis will be placed on the role that developmental stages play in the teaching and leading of physical activities for all ages. (Students not in the physical education strand will complete assignments based on the role that developmental stages play on their teaching field.)
  
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    PHED 599 - Special Topics: Physical Education

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of physical education.
  
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    PHED 699 - Special Topics: Physical Education

    (1-4 cr) This course will examine in detail a specific subject or subject area in the discipline of physical education.

Physics

  
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    PHYS 201 - College Physics I

    (3 cr) An algebra- and trigonometry-based treatment of the fundamentals of selected classical physics topics including motion, force, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, gravitation, rotation, acoustics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics.  Corequisite: PHYS 201L  must be taken concurrently with PHYS 201.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
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    PHYS 201L - College Physics I Laboratory

    (1 cr) A two hour per week laboratory course focusing on selected classical physics topics including motion, force, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, gravitation, rotation, acoustics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics.  Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 201 .

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
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    PHYS 202 - College Physics II

    (3 cr) An algebra- and trigonometry-based treatment of the fundamentals of selected classical and modern physics topics including acoustics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum mechanics.  Prerequisites: PHYS 201 . Corequisite: PHYS 202L  must be taken concurrently with PHYS 202.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
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    PHYS 202L - College Physics II Laboratory

    (1 cr) A two hour per week laboratory course focusing on selected classical and modern physics topics including acoustics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum mechanics.  Prerequisites: PHYS 201L . Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 202 .

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
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    PHYS 221 - General Physics I

    (3 cr) A calculus-based treatment of fundamentals of selected classical physics topics including motion, force, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, gravitation, rotation, acoustics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics. PHYS 221L  must be taken concurrently with PHYS 221. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 207 .
  
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    PHYS 221L - General Physics I Laboratory

    (1 cr) A two hour per week laboratory course focusing on selected classical physics topics including motion, force, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, gravitation, rotation, acoustics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics.  Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 221 .

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
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    PHYS 222 - General Physics II

    (3 cr) A calculus-based treatment of the fundamentals of selected classical and modern physics topics including acoustics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum mechanics.  Prerequisites: PHYS 221 . Corequisite: PHYS 222L  must be taken concurrently with PHYS 222.

    CORE CODES :   LS

  
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    PHYS 222L - General Physics II Laboratory

    (1 cr) A two hour per week laboratory course focusing on selected classical and modern physics topics including acoustics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum mechanics. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 222 . Prerequisites: PHYS 221L .
  
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    PHYS 301 - Energy

    (4cr) In this course students will learn fundamentals of how energy is converted from one form to another and utilized to do useful work. These fundamentals are essential to our energy-intensive civilization and important for understanding humankind’s impact on the environment and utilization of natural resources. Topics will include thermodynamics processes, heat engines, heat transfer, electromagnetic induction, nuclear physics, and the photoelectric effect.  Previously titled Physics of Energy (3cr). Prerequisites: Any 4-credit Core Curriculum science class, or Permission of Instructor.
  
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    PHYS 302 - Physical Computing

    (4cr) In this course students will learn how to build digital devices to sense and interact with the world around them. Such devices are a ubiquitous part of the built environment and increasingly mediate humankind’s interactions and relationships with both the built and the natural environments. Topics will include electric circuits, passive and active electronic components, microcontroller programming, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, and wired and wireless serial communication. At the end of the semester students will work in groups to fabricate and demonstrate physical computers of their own design. Prerequisites: Any 4-credit Core Curriculum science class, or Permission of Instructor.
  
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    PHYS 322 - Electricity and Magnetism

    (3 cr) Principles of electricity and magnetism with practical applications. Prerequisites: PHYS 222  and MATH 208 .
  
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    PHYS 323 - Modern Physics

    (3 cr) Topics will include special relativity, atomic structure, nuclear structure, solid state physics, and elementary particles. Prerequisites: PHYS 222  and MATH 207 .
  
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    PHYS 330 - Advanced Laboratory

    (2 cr) A series of laboratory experiments in electricity, magnetism, mechanics, and modern physics. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 221 , 222  .
  
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    PHYS 401 - Special Projects

    (1 cr each) Experimental and theoretical research projects in specific areas of physics. Project assignment dependent upon student’s ability and interest.
  
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    PHYS 404 - Special Projects

    (1 cr each) Experimental and theoretical research projects in specific areas of physics. Project assignment dependent upon student’s ability and interest.

Political Science

  
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    PSCI 100 - Politics and Government

    (3 cr) A consideration of concepts and issues essential to the understanding and study of politics. Classical and modern theories of the political system, including communism, fascism, democracy, and socialism are examined in an American and international context including study of specific nations. The approach of this course will be both empirical and normative.

     :   SO   GL

  
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    PSCI 101 - American Federal Government

    (3 cr) A study of the functions and administration of the government of the United States.

     :   SO   CK

  
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    PSCI 150 - First Year Seminar

    (1cr) This course is intended to integrate students into the life and culture of Shepherd University (as do all FYEX courses) and to the Political Science department, as well as to prepare them with the foundations for academic success in the liberal arts and in the social sciences. Topics covered include familiarity with the field of Political Science, faculty and research conducted in the department, social science methodology, career options in the field, and healthy living for a successful university experience. In this seminar course, students will also be prepared for a successful academic career through the cultivation of valued skills such as critical reading and analysis, writing and discussion, and argument and debate.

    CORE CODES :  FY

  
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    PSCI 200 - American Political Institutions

    (3cr) An introductory course for majors and minors. Provides in-depth exploration of the major dimensions of American government. Examines in detail the philosophical underpinnings of the American system of government, the meaning of federalism, the roles and responsibilities of the three branches of government, and the key provisions of the Constitution of the United States. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 210 - Conduct of Political Inquiry I

    (3 cr) Introduction to research methods and their application to the study of politics. Topics include epistemology, methodology, research question formation, literature review, research design, information literacy, and sampling.  A central focus of the course is on learning to effectively evaluate the large amounts of information presented to us in daily life. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 211 - Conduct of Political Inquiry II

    (4cr) Continued exploration of research methods and their application to the study of politics. Topics include qualitative case study analysis, interpretive analysis, survey construction and analysis, document analysis, and basic statistical applications. A central focus of the course is on learning to evaluate effectively the large amounts of information presented to us in daily life. Previously offered at 3cr. Prerequisites: PSCI 210  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 212 - Qualitative Methods

    (3cr) Introduction to qualitative research methodology and methods and their application to the study of politics. Topics include history of social science research; research design; data generation through semi-structured and unstructured interviewing, participant observation, and archival work; methods of interpretation; evaluation of qualitative research; and policy relevance of qualitative research. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 300 - State and Local Government

    (3 cr) A study of the functions and administration of the government on the state and county levels. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.

    CORE CODES :   SO   CK

  
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    PSCI 301 - Public Policy

    (3 cr) Study of public policy development and implementation in the United States, with emphasis on the ways in which cultural, political, and institutional factors may inhibit or expedite pursuit of public policies designed to meet societal needs and with consideration of selected contemporary issues of public policy within this framework. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 302 - Intro to Political Theory

    (3 cr) A survey course that provides a broad-based introduction to political theory and philosophy, ranging from Plato to Rawls.  Particular emphasis is placed on the tension between the authority of government and the freedom of individuals, as well as the role this conflict plays in the organizing of governments. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or perission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 303 - Introduction to Public Administration

    (3 cr) An introductory study of the development, organization, procedures, processes, and human relations factors in governmental administration. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of administrative practices in the federal, state, and local governments in the United States. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSCI 304 - Intro to Comparative Politics

    (3 cr) An introduction to one of political science’s major sub-fields–Comparative Politics.  This course focuses on the systematic relationship between social, economic, and political variables across the globe (although country-specific material is widely cited).  Students will be exposed to research strategies, techniques, and terminology used by those in this discipline. Prerequisites: PSCI 100  or PSCI 101  or permission of instructor.
 

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